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I am trying to assign values to a 2d int array in C.

int **worldMap;

I want to assign each row to the array, so I do this in a loop:

worldMap[0][sprCount] = split(tmp.c_str(), delim);
sprCount++;

The problem is I get an error the above line saying can not convert int* to int.

Here is the code to create the 2D array:

int** Array2D(int arraySizeX, int arraySizeY)
{
    int** theArray;
    theArray = (int**) malloc(arraySizeX*sizeof(int*));
    for (int i = 0; i < arraySizeX; i++)
        theArray[i] = (int*) malloc(arraySizeY*sizeof(int));
    return theArray;
}

I want to take the return pointer of this function (shown above) and put it into the Y dimension.

int* split(const char* str, const char* delim)
{
    char* tok;
    int* result;
    int count = 0;
    tok = strtok((char*)str, delim);
    while (tok != NULL)
    {
        count++;
        tok = strtok(NULL, delim);
    }

    result = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int) * count);

    count = 0;
    tok = strtok((char*)str, delim);
    while (tok != NULL)
    {
        result[count] = atoi(tok);
        count++;
        tok = strtok(NULL, delim);
    }
    return result;
}
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3  
int **worldMap; is not a 2D array, don't try to treat it as one. Also, do not cast the return value of malloc(). –  user529758 Oct 6 '13 at 6:27
    
Short version: I think you want worldMap[sprCount]. Long version: worldMap is a pointer-to-pointer, and assigned a dynamic array of pointers. Dereferencing it with worldMap[0] allows access to the pointer at that slot, which is a int* representing a dynamic array of int. Dereferencing that with [sprCount] results in the int lvalue in slot sprCount. Thus your error. An int is not an int*. If you want the sprCount "row" in your pointer array, use worldMap[sprCount]. (and fair warning, free the old occupant of that slot or you'll leak memory like a sieve leaks water). –  WhozCraig Oct 6 '13 at 6:40
    
What's with tmp.c_str()? That is normally a part of C++… –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 6 '13 at 6:40
    
Your split() function should simply return an int, not allocate and return an int *. You've already allocated the space for an int in the array. Alternatively, you don't need the second level of allocation in the Array2d() function and the assignment should be worldMap[sprCount] = split(...). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 6 '13 at 6:42
    
@JonathanLeffler That looks like a pretty deliberate row-creation function. I think the original row-allocations filled with indeterminate values in Array2D may be a better candidate to throw out. Hard saying without some real context. –  WhozCraig Oct 6 '13 at 6:45

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