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Shouldn't this be a pretty straightforward operation? However, I see there's neither a size() nor length() method.

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4  
Please stop writing tags in titles. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 '11 at 14:08
4  
I would love to know the reason for that omission. –  Slamice Mar 4 '12 at 6:53
    
My understanding of the question was that you want to find the size of the ResultSet IN BYTES, not the number of tuples... –  DejanLekic Dec 6 '12 at 17:40

10 Answers 10

up vote 108 down vote accepted

ResultSet.last() followed by ResultSet.getRow() will give you the row count, but it may not be a good idea as it can mean reading the entire table over the network and throwing away the data. Do a SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ... query instead.

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6  
last() and getRow() aren't static methods in the ResultSet class. –  JeeBee Oct 10 '08 at 16:21
45  
For brevity's sake I always reference methods in this fashion when writing about them to others, regardless of whether they are static or not. Actually creating an instance of the object and calling the method is implied. –  laz Oct 10 '08 at 18:23
23  
I write SomeClass.staticMethod() and SomeClass#instanceMethod() for less confusion. –  Jake May 13 '11 at 3:17
7  
How does one fetch the value returned when executing a select count? –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Jun 2 '11 at 9:14
6  
ResultSet#last() doesn't work on all types of ResultSet objects, you need to make sure you use one that is either ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE or ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_SENSITIVE –  Marius Ion Jun 13 '12 at 13:47
ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();
int rowcount = 0;
if (rs.last()) {
  rowcount = rs.getRow();
  rs.beforeFirst(); // not rs.first() because the rs.next() below will move on, missing the first element
}
while (rs.next()) {
  // do your standard per row stuff
}
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4  
Inside the if(rs.last()) code block, wouldn't the correct method be rs.beforeFirst() instead of rs.first()? This way, you are not skipping the first record in your result set for processing in the while loop. –  karlgrz Jan 26 '09 at 17:04
    
KG - Indeed that looks right at a brief look at the code! –  JeeBee Jan 27 '09 at 12:36

Well, if you have a ResultSet of type ResultSet.TYPE_FORWARD_ONLY you want to keep it that way (and not to switch to a ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE or ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE in order to be able to use .last()).

I suggest a very nice and efficient hack, where you add a first bogus/phony row at the top containing the number of rows.

Example

Let's say your query is the following

select MYBOOL,MYINT,MYCHAR,MYSMALLINT,MYVARCHAR
from MYTABLE
where ...blahblah...

and your output looks like

true    65537 "Hey" -32768 "The quick brown fox"
false  123456 "Sup"    300 "The lazy dog"
false -123123 "Yo"       0 "Go ahead and jump"
false       3 "EVH"    456 "Might as well jump"
...
[1000 total rows]

Simply refactor your code to something like this:

Statement s=myConnection.createStatement(ResultSet.TYPE_FORWARD_ONLY,
                                         ResultSet.CONCUR_READ_ONLY);
String from_where="FROM myTable WHERE ...blahblah... ";
//h4x
ResultSet rs=s.executeQuery("select count(*)as RECORDCOUNT,"
                           +       "cast(null as boolean)as MYBOOL,"
                           +       "cast(null as int)as MYINT,"
                           +       "cast(null as char(1))as MYCHAR,"
                           +       "cast(null as smallint)as MYSMALLINT,"
                           +       "cast(null as varchar(1))as MYVARCHAR "
                           +from_where
                           +"UNION ALL "//the "ALL" part prevents internal re-sorting to prevent duplicates (and we do not want that)
                           +"select cast(null as int)as RECORDCOUNT,"
                           +       "MYBOOL,MYINT,MYCHAR,MYSMALLINT,MYVARCHAR "
                           +from_where);

Your query output will now be something like

1000 null     null null    null null
null true    65537 "Hey" -32768 "The quick brown fox"
null false  123456 "Sup"    300 "The lazy dog"
null false -123123 "Yo"       0 "Go ahead and jump"
null false       3 "EVH"    456 "Might as well jump"
...
[1001 total rows]

So you just have to

if(rs.next())
    System.out.println("Recordcount: "+rs.getInt("RECORDCOUNT"));//hack: first record contains the record count
while(rs.next())
    //do your stuff
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I got an exception when using rs.last();

if(rs.last()){
    rowCount = rs.getRow(); 
    rs.beforeFirst();
}

:

java.sql.SQLException: Invalid operation for forward only resultset

it's due to by default it is ResultSet.TYPE_FORWARD_ONLY, which means you can only use rs.next();

the solution is:

stmt=conn.createStatement(ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE,
    ResultSet.CONCUR_READ_ONLY); 
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5  
Switching from ResultSet.TYPE_FORWARD_ONLY to ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE usually incurs in a huge performance penalty. –  Unai Vivi May 24 '13 at 7:58

It is a simple way to do rows-count.

ResultSet rs = job.getSearchedResult(stmt);
int rsCount = 0;

//but notice that you'll only get correct ResultSet size after end of the while loop
while(rs.next())
{
    //do your other per row stuff 
    rsCount = rsCount + 1;
}//end while
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4  
Yeah, that works. But I think the OP struggles with knowing the number of rows before actually processing them. Real life reasons I'd have to fight this issue so far: 1.) paging of record rows 2.) showing the rows processed in long-running tasks for progress monitoring purposes... –  ppeterka May 24 '13 at 7:23
    
Preallocating data structure size are another reason. I've seen plenty of libs return 10 element Lists when there is only a single value because the dev's had this same issue with ResultSet. –  Joseph Lust Nov 21 '13 at 17:24
theStatement=theConnection.createStatement(ResultSet.TYPE_SCROLL_INSENSITIVE, ResultSet.CONCUR_READ_ONLY);

ResultSet theResult=theStatement.executeQuery(query); 

//Get the size of the data returned
theResult.last();     
int size = theResult.getRow() * theResult.getMetaData().getColumnCount();       
theResult.beforeFirst();
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1  
This deals with the number of columns, not the number of rows... –  ppeterka May 24 '13 at 7:24

I checked the runtime value of the ResultSet interface and found out it was pretty much a ResultSetImpl all the time. ResultSetImpl has a method called getUpdateCount() which returns the value you are looking for.

This code sample should suffice:
ResultSet resultSet = executeQuery(sqlQuery);
double rowCount = ((ResultSetImpl)resultSet).getUpdateCount()

I realize that downcasting is generally an unsafe procedure but this method hasn't yet failed me.

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Not working with Tomcat/MySQL: java.lang.ClassCastException: org.apache.tomcat.dbcp.dbcp.DelegatingResultSet cannot be cast to com.mysql.jdbc.ResultSetImpl –  Panu Haaramo Jun 18 at 10:31
int i = 0;
while(rs.next()) {
    i++;
}
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        String sql = "select count(*) from message";
        ps =  cn.prepareStatement(sql);

        rs = ps.executeQuery();
        int rowCount = 0;
        while(rs.next()) {
            rowCount = Integer.parseInt(rs.getString("count(*)"));
            System.out.println(Integer.parseInt(rs.getString("count(*)")));
        }
        System.out.println("Count : " + rowCount);

     }
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The way of getting size of ResultSet, No need of using ArrayList etc

int size =0;  
if (rs != null)   
{  
rs.beforeFirst();  
 rs.last();  
size = rs.getRow();
}

Now You will get size, And if you want print the ResultSet, before printing use following line of code too,

rs.beforeFirst();  
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