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<script>
//in one script
var someVarName_10 = 20;
</script>

I want to get access to this variable from another script by name of variable. With window object its simple, is it possible with local variable?

I mean access this var by code like this:

<script>
  alert(all_vars['someVar' + 'Name' + num]);
</script>
share|improve this question
1  
Your sample shows a global variable. You want to know if you can access it from a local scope? – Crescent Fresh Dec 17 '09 at 10:46
    
It really depends on what you mean by 'local scope'.. Javascript functions are scoped only to functions, not blocks or even files – K Prime Dec 17 '09 at 10:50
    
up vote 45 down vote accepted

Do you want to do something like this?

<script>
//in one script
var someVarName_10 = 20;

alert(window["someVarName_10"]); //alert 20

</script>

Update: because OP edited the question.

<script>
  num=10;
  alert(window['someVar' + 'Name_' + num]); //alert 20
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, I was wrong, i thought that vars are not in window, thanks – appqui-platform Dec 17 '09 at 10:59
    
you're welcome. – YOU Dec 17 '09 at 11:00
1  
I don't care what OP actually wanted. I care about what is in question title and therefore becomes google result in my searches. – Tomáš Zato Oct 22 '15 at 8:15

I've noticed that everyone is advising global var creation this will lead to variables leak to global namespace. When you dynamically creating classnames or just variables it's easy to keep em local:

this['className'] = 123;

or

this['varName'] = 123;

Name-spacing would look like this:

vars = {};
vars['varName'] = 123;
vars.varName // 123
share|improve this answer
1  
var this['className'] = 123; looks like a syntax error to me. – Felix Kling Jan 19 '13 at 1:33
    
you right i don't know why I added var – Andrew Shatnyy Apr 7 '13 at 19:54
    
This is better than accepted answer. More descriptive about how this feature works in class scopes. – Mr Universe Jun 22 '15 at 1:54
<script>
    var someVarName_10 = 20;
    var num = 10;
    alert(eval('someVar' + 'Name_' + num)); //alert 20
</script>
share|improve this answer

well, for debugging purpose only, you could do something like this. I use it during the development of classes, where some variables must remain private (var). this work even in local variable (and global of curse)

function MYCLASS(){
    var a=1, b=2, c=3;
    this.public = "variable";
    this.debug = function(sVar){
        return eval(sVar);
    }
}

var myThing = new MYCLASS();
myThing.debug('a') //return 1
myThing.debug('b') //return 2
myThing.debug('c') //return 3
share|improve this answer

If this is what you said:

<script type="text/javascript">
var hello = 'test';
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
  alert (hello);
</script>

It works because script are finally available to the document and you can access their vars.

share|improve this answer

Try

<script type="text/javascript">
var hello = 'test';
alert(window.hallo);
</script>

or

<script type="text/javascript">
var hello = 'test';
alert(window["test"]);
</script>

Where "test" may be any Stringname of a variable

share|improve this answer

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