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    for (String fruit : list)
    {
        if("banane".equals(fruit))
            list.remove(fruit);
        System.out.println(fruit);
    }

Here a loop with remove instruction. At execution time, I get some ConcurrentModificationException, below the console output:

Exception in thread "main" java.util.ConcurrentModificationException
at java.util.AbstractList$Itr.checkForComodification(AbstractList.java:449)
at java.util.AbstractList$Itr.next(AbstractList.java:420)
at Boucle.main(Boucle.java:14)
abricot
banane

Question: How to remove some element with a loop?

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marked as duplicate by Jason C Nov 18 at 23:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You need to use the iterator directly, and remove the item via that iterator.

for (Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator(); iterator.hasNext(); ) {
    String fruit = iterator.next();
    if ("banane".equals(fruit)) {
        iterator.remove();
    }
    System.out.println(fruit);
}
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For the one who will recognize himself : don't use for with incremental index and list.size() !! I wanted to change the code with a foreach loop and it was not the correct soluce. Yours is the one. –  enguerran Dec 17 '09 at 11:39
    
just change it.hasNext() to iterator.hasNext() and it's perfect! (obvious.... but who knows....) –  Carlos Heuberger Dec 17 '09 at 12:10

In addition to using the Iterator directly (which I would recommend) you can also store elements that you want to remove in a different list.

List<String> toRemove = new ArrayList<String>();
for (String fruit : list) {
    if ("banane".equals(fruit))
        toRemove.add(fruit);
    System.out.println(fruit);
}
for (String fruit : toRemove) {
    list.remove(fruit);
}

Mind you, I do not recommend this, it’s just an alternative. :)

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Your solution is too verbose –  enguerran Dec 17 '09 at 11:37
1  
Yes, it is. Which is why I would use the Iterator-based solution–which is what I have written. –  Bombe Dec 17 '09 at 12:23
    
There is more than one way to do it, but most of those ways are wrong ;) –  Jorn Dec 17 '09 at 12:33
2  
There’s also more than one meaning for “wrong.” :) –  Bombe Dec 17 '09 at 13:36
for(Iterator<String> iter = list.iterator(); iter.hasNext(); )
{
   String fruit = iter.next();
   if("banana".equals(fruit))
      iter.remove();
   System.out.println(fruit);
}
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Use a for loop, and loop over the collection in a reverse order. (That means, start with the last element, and loop to the first element. By doing so, you won't get problems by the indexes that change because of removing elements from the collection.

You get the exception in the example that you post, because the list over which your iterator iterates, has changed, which means that the iterator becomes invalid.

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sounds dangerous. How about doubly-linked list and the like, where memory is not contiguous ? I don't know if lists et al have index in Java, or how iterator is implemented, but if it's like C++, I would be surprised if your approach have worked with anything except ArrayList. –  Alexander Malakhov Oct 9 '13 at 11:49

This seems a bit complicated, why not just do a normal for loop? I think it looks cleaner and won't throw this error. Just decriment i if you remove something. at least mine works, anyway. Those sort of auto-loops are more for coding convenience, I thought, so if they aren't being convenient then just don't use them.

for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
    String fruit = list.get(i);
    System.out.println(fruit);

    if ("banane".equals(fruit)) {
        list.remove(fruit);
        i--;
    }
}
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Similar to what Bombe suggested, but in less lines of code by iterating on the list copy, but removing from the original list;

List<String> temp = new ArrayList<String>(list);
for (String fruit : temp)
{
    if("banane".equals(fruit))
        list.remove(fruit);
    System.out.println(fruit);
}

Personally I think this looks nicer than iterating with an iterator.

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I think it is easier to read –  enguerran Dec 18 '09 at 8:52
    
I would say this is bug prone.. having 2 lists where we dont need the second. Just my 2cents. –  cheekoo May 17 '11 at 20:45
    
@cheekoo, I can see how it would use unnecessary memory, but I fail to see how a competent developer would introduce bugs using this method. –  Tom Neyland May 18 '11 at 17:25
    
haha! I agree. But now you have started using conditional statements! "COMPETENT developer" ;) –  cheekoo May 18 '11 at 17:41
1  
This has unnecessary iterations. new ArrayList(list) will iterate over list. Then you iterate over it again with the for loop. –  Steve Kuo Jun 20 '11 at 15:54
ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c", "d"));
Iterator<String> iter = list.iterator();
while (iter.hasNext()) {
    String s = iter.next();

    if (s.equals("a")) {
        iter.remove();
    }
}

is the best approach..

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