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I have a Python list of dates and I'm using min and max to find the most recent and the oldest (first, is that the best method?), but also I need to format the dates into something where I can figure out the current time and subtract the oldest date in the list so I can say something like "In the last 27 minutes..." where I can state how many days, hours, or minutes have past since the oldest. Here is my list (the dates change obviously depending on what I'm pulling) so you can see the current format. How do I get the info I need?

[u'Sun Oct 06 18:00:55 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:57:41 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:55:44 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:54:10 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:58 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:58 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:25 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:30:35 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:25:28 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:24:04 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:24:04 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:22:08 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:22:08 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:21:00 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:18:49 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:18:49 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:15:29 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:15:29 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:13:35 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:12:18 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:12:00 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:07:34 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:03:59 +0000 2013']
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You have to make your question a little clearer. How are you fetching the dates? Do you get them as datetime objects? What is the intended result for that specific list? –  yuvi Oct 6 '13 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You won't get the oldest and newest date/time entries from your list with the entries by using min and max - "Fri" will come before "Mon", for example. So you'll want to put things into a data structure that represents date/time stamps properly.

Fortunately, Python's datetime module comes with a method to convert lots of date/time stamp strings into a proper representation - datetime.datetime.strptime. See the guide for how to use it.

Once that's done you can use min and max and then timedelta to compute the difference.

from datetime import datetime

# Start with the initial list
A = [u'Sun Oct 06 18:00:55 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:57:41 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:55:44 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:54:10 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:58 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:58 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:35:25 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:34:39 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:30:35 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:25:28 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:24:04 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:24:04 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:22:08 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:22:08 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:21:00 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:18:49 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:18:49 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:15:29 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:15:29 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:13:35 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:12:18 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:12:00 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:07:34 +0000 2013', u'Sun Oct 06 17:03:59 +0000 2013']

# This is the format string the date/time stamps are using
# On Python 3.3 on Windows you can use this format
# s_format = "%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %z %Y"
# However, Python 2.7 on Windows doesn't work with that. If all of your date/time stamps use the same timezone you can do:
s_format = "%a %b %d %H:%M:%S +0000 %Y"

# Convert the text list into datetime objects
A = [datetime.strptime(d, s_format) for d in A]

# Get the extremes
oldest = min(A)
newest = max(A)

# If you substract oldest from newest you get a timedelta object, which can give you the total number of seconds between them. You can use this to calculate days, hours, and minutes.
delta = int((newest - oldest).total_seconds())
delta_days, rem = divmod(delta, 86400)
delta_hours, rem = divmod(rem, 3600)
delta_minutes, delta_seconds = divmod(rem, 60)
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Thanks for writing all this out. I am getting this error though "File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/_strptim‌​e.py", line 317, in _strptime (bad_directive, format)) ValueError: 'z' is a bad directive in format '%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %z %Y'" –  user2270029 Oct 6 '13 at 18:58
    
Oh, I wrote this in Python 3.3. You're using 2.7. There's some differences; let me see if I can figure out what's hanging up./ –  Bo102010 Oct 6 '13 at 18:59
    
Added a workaround for Python 2.7 on Windows; assumes all the time zones are the same. –  Bo102010 Oct 6 '13 at 19:06
    
Awesome, thanks! If I put "datetime.utcnow()" in place of "newest" will that give me the number of seconds as of right now since the oldest time? –  user2270029 Oct 6 '13 at 19:30
    
Yes, I think. so. Make sure you check the difference between datetime.now and datetime.utcnow - your time zones above suggest there's no difference, but be aware. –  Bo102010 Oct 6 '13 at 21:25

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