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When looping through lines of text, what is the neatest way (most 'Ruby') to do an if else statement (or similar) to check if the string is a single word or not?

def check_if_single_word(string)
   # code here
end

s1 = "two words"
s2 = "hello"

check_if_single_word(s1) -> false
check_if_single_word(s2) -> true
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Trim the string first then search for a space, or match a regular expression. I don't know ruby so can't supply code. –  Bathsheba Oct 6 '13 at 19:28
1  
I am not the downvoter (or the upvoter) but this question could be construed as being borderline in terms of the level of research that you undertook before posing the question. –  Bathsheba Oct 6 '13 at 19:46
1  
There are many ways to do this. One is string.split.size == 1. For example, "dog cat \t hog".split => ["dog", "cat", "hog"] and then .count returns the size of the array. split disregards the escaped character \t`. Be sure you get the answer you want if the string is empty. –  Cary Swoveland Oct 6 '13 at 19:47
1  
@Bathsheba As someone new to Ruby, I'm always trying to find out what are the most idiomatic ways to achieve a simple task. There are certainly several options - I hope that the different ways of achieving the same simple task might be of interest to other beginners too. That's in a nutshell why I asked the question. That's how I hope to really learn how to approach Ruby in the most natural Ruby way. –  Jonathan_W Oct 6 '13 at 19:54
1  
Why do you want to check if it's a single word? Just curious. –  Mark Thomas Oct 6 '13 at 20:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you're asking about the 'most Ruby' way, I'd rename the method to single_word?

One way is to check for the presence of a space character.

def single_word?(string)
  !string.strip.include? " "
end

But if you want to allow a particular set of characters that meet your definition of word, perhaps including apostrophes and hyphens, use a regex:

def single_word?(string)
  string.scan(/[\w'-]+/).length == 1
end
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I would give +1 to your first code... :) which is string.include? " ". –  Arup Rakshit Oct 6 '13 at 19:57

Following your definition of a word given in the comment:

[A] stripped string that doesn't [include] whitespace

the code would be

def check_if_single_word(string)
  string.strip == string and string.include?(" ").!
end

check_if_single_word("two words") # => false
check_if_single_word("New York") # => false
check_if_single_word("hello") # => true
check_if_single_word(" hello") # => false
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strip == self - are you using the method 'strip' as a freestanding object? Can this be done with all methods? First time I've seen this. –  Jonathan_W Oct 6 '13 at 20:32
    
That was a mistake. –  sawa Oct 6 '13 at 20:34
    
Another interesting thing I'm seeing for the first time, negating as a method after the statement. So is //string.include?(" ").! == !string.include?(" ")// ? –  Jonathan_W Oct 6 '13 at 20:37
    
@Jonathan_W Yes. That is right. –  sawa Oct 6 '13 at 20:44
    
Thanks - v interesting. Is there any reason to go one route or the other, or just personal preference? –  Jonathan_W Oct 6 '13 at 20:46

Here some code may help you out :

def check_if_single_word(string)
   ar = string.scan(/\w+/)
   ar.size == 1 ? "only one word" : "more than one word"
end

s1 = "two words"
s2 = "hello"
check_if_single_word s1 # => "more than one word"
check_if_single_word s2 # => "only one word"

def check_if_single_word(string)
   string.scan(/\w+/).size == 1
end

s1 = "two words"
s2 = "hello"
check_if_single_word s1 # => false
check_if_single_word s2 # => true
share|improve this answer
    
I like the boolean options either side of the ":" in your 3rd line. Upvote! –  Jonathan_W Oct 6 '13 at 20:29

I would check if a space exists in the string.

def check_if_single_word(string)
   return !(string.strip =~ / /)
end

.strip will remove excess white space that may exist at the start and the end of the string.

!(myString =~ / /) means that the string does not match the regular expression of a single space. Likewise you could also use !string.strip[/ /].

share|improve this answer

a Ruby Way. Extend the calss String

class String

  def one?
    !self.strip.include? " "
  end

end

Then use "Hello world".one? to Check if string contains one word or more.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to use self... –  Arup Rakshit Oct 6 '13 at 20:01
    
I wouldn't recommend monkeypatching a builtin to a beginner. Nor would I recommend the name one? as it isn't self-explanatory enough. –  Mark Thomas Oct 6 '13 at 20:03
    
Also, you have an error. Try executing this in irb, you'll see it. –  Mark Thomas Oct 6 '13 at 20:28

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