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im writting a small script for starting an 'xpra' session with a remote machine. I'm pretty new to bash scripting, so I was wondering if someone could help me clean up the code a bit, concerning best practices.

The ssh line is the one i'm having problems with, as I must CTRL-C on the keyboard for the command to be killed and let it continue to echo "done".

How can I fix that minor issue?

    ###                                         ###
    #       syntax: xpra.sh hostmachine command   #
    ##                                          ###

    ## Wake on LAN host machine.
    ~/scripts/$1

    ## Check if online and ssh command.
    ## Attach xpra client.
    while :; do
        ping -c 1 $1
        if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
            ssh $1 "xpra start :7 && sleep 2 && ("DISPLAY=:7 $2"&) ";
            echo "done";
            sleep 5;
            echo "attaching";
            (xpra attach ssh:$1:7 &);
            break;
        else    
            echo "host offline";
            sleep 180s;
        fi
    done
share|improve this question
1  
I'm not familiar with xpra, but ssh -f $COMMAND will open an ssh session, ask for your credentials, then go into the background as it launches the command on the remote host. – Adam Liss Oct 7 '13 at 0:35
    
thanks Adam Liss, didn't realize ssh had a built-in option for that. works beautifully! – jarshvor Oct 18 '13 at 18:43

Newer versions support starting remote sessions in one command, try:

xpra start ssh:HOST:DISPLAY --start-child=xterm

this will

  • start a new remote session on display DISPLAY
  • start an xterm in it
  • then connect your client to this session

It's a lot cleaner than a script that relies on "sleep"...

share|improve this answer

Either you want the ssh line to finish before moving to the next line, in which case what you have is correct; or you want to move on to the next line while it is still running, in which case you can append a "&" character to the line:

ssh $1 "xpra start :7 && sleep 2 && ("DISPLAY=:7 $2"&) " &

(Main comment I would make about your style is that ending all your lines with ";"'s is unnecessary, and it would be clearer if you indented the parts of your if statement.)

share|improve this answer
    
The & will put ssh in the background before it asks for your credentials, which is probably not what you want. See my comment about the -f option. – Adam Liss Oct 7 '13 at 0:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

as Adam Liss mentioned in the comments:

ssh -f $COMMAND

will open an ssh session, ask for your credentials, then go into the background as it launches the command on the remote host.

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