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Just a general question say the signature of a function is:

void f( const string & s )...

Why is it necessary to pass this by reference if you are not actually changing the string (since it is constant)?

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4  
To avoid making an unnecessary and wasteful copy. –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Oct 7 '13 at 0:48

5 Answers 5

There are two alternatives to passing by reference - passing by pointer, and passing by value.

Passing by pointer is similar to passing by reference: the same argument of "why pass a pointer if you do not want to modify it" could be made for it.

Passing by value requires making a copy. Copying a string is usually more expensive, because dynamic memory needs to be allocated and de-allocated under the cover. That is why it is often a better idea to pass a const reference / pointer than passing a copy that you are not planning to change.

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Since passing by reference allows the function to modify the caller's copy - it should be const ref unless modify behaviour is specifically required –  Martin Beckett Oct 7 '13 at 0:57

When you pass a variable by value, it makes a copy. Passing by reference avoids that copy. You want to mark it const for the same reason: Since you're not making a copy, you don't want to accidentally mess with the original. I think this could also potentially allow for compiler optimizations.

The reason you don't usually see this for int, char, float, and other primitive types is that they're relatively cheap to copy, and in some cases, passing by reference is more expensive (for example, passing a char by reference could involve passing 64-bits of data (the pointer) instead of 8-bits. Passing by reference also adds some indirection, which isn't a big deal with a big type like a string, but is wasteful for something like an int.

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It is not "necessary," but the common answer is "for performance reasons, to prevent copying," however that is a naive answer and the truth is a bit more complex.

In your example, assuming s really is immutable and something you don't "own or can't change," then the const decorator is appropriate for s. If the reference of s wasn't taken, then that would guarantee a copied (excluding compiler optimizations).

If f() is not going to use the copy of s after f() returns, then the effort of copying s was wasted. So, passing by reference prevents the copying and f() retains the ability to inspect the string s. Great. And again, that's the naive answer and pre-C++11, would be the mostly correct answer.

There are more scenarios worth considering in order to answer "is it necessary?" but I'll focus on just one:

If the caller of f() doesn't need the string s after invoking f(), but f() needs to retain a copy of the data.

Suppose the code is:

void f(const std::string& arg1);   // f()'s signature
void g(const std::string& arg1) {
   std::string s(arg1);
   s.append(" mutate s");
   f(s);
}

In this case, you would have constructed the string s, passed it by const reference to f(), and everything is fine from a performance perspective if you assume f() is opaque and there are no further optimizations available.

Now, suppose f() needs a copy of the data in s, then what? Well, f() will call a copy constructor and copy s in to a local variable:

 // Hypothetical f()
 void f(const std::string& s) {
   this->someString_ = s;
 }

In this case, by the time the data is stored in someString_, the normal constructor will have been called in g(), and the copy ctor will have been called in f(), however the work done in g() will have been wasted. To improve performance, there are two things that can be done, pass by value and/or use move constructors.

// Explicitly move arg1 in to someString_
void f(std::string&& arg1) {
  this->somestring_ = std::move(arg1);
}

void g(const std::string& arg1) {
   std::string s(arg1);
   s.append(" mutate s");
   f(s);
}

Which is explicitly doing what the compiler will automatically do starting with C++11, which means the more correct version is to pass by value and let the compiler do the right thing:

void f(std::string arg1) {
  this->somestring_ = arg1; // Implicit move, let the compiler do the right thing
}

void g(const std::string& arg1) {
   std::string s(arg1);
   s.append(" mutate s");
   f(s);
}

And in this case, the string is constructed in g() and no additional work was done anywhere. So in this case, the answer to,

Why is it necessary to pass this by reference if you are not actually changing the string (since it is constant)?

The string wasn't changed, but it was copied, and therefore const reference was not necessary.

It's an exercise for the reader to list the optimizations the compiler can take when s is or isn't mutated after the call to f().

I can't recommend enough that people look in to David Abrams's post, 'Want Speed? Pass by value' or Is it better in C++ to pass by value or pass by constant reference? and post How to pass objects to functions in C++?.

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It is necessary to bind a rvalue. –  texasbruce Oct 7 '13 at 5:37

in other words, you would get the speed of passing by reference ( not making extra copies ). and the integrity of passing by value ( the original variable value is not changed)

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It isn't 'necessary', but it's a very good idea, for several reasons:

  1. Efficiency. Not creating or destroying new strings is more efficient than creating and destroying them, especially as strings are arbitrary in length and therefore require dynamically allocated memory.
  2. A string can be constructed from a string literal. If you specify const you allow the compiler to construct a temporary string from a literal so that the caller can just provide the literal rather than the string object. If you don't specify const the compiler can't do that, so the caller can't do that either.
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Assuming a non-const literal, it's not always guaranteed to be faster due to Copy Elision. In C++11, if you overuse const, you are preventing the use of move semantics. –  Sean Oct 7 '13 at 3:33

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