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So in the past few months I've taught myself web design. Of course there's a ton more to learn, but I feel that I have a firm grasp on what I know so far. One thing that I've wondered about recently is how necessary the div is, especially when I end up using absolute positioning. For instance I recently I wrote the following code:

<section id="header-section">
        <header class="main-header">
            <h1>The Voice of Jeremy Donahue</h1>
                <nav class="main-navigation">
                    <ul>
                        <li><a href="http://www.thevoiceofjeremydonahue.com/about">About</a></li>
                        <li><a href="http://www.thevoiceofjeremydonahue.com/contact">Contact</a></li>
                    </ul>
                </nav>
        </header>
</section> 

When I read the source code on a lot of pages it seems to me that things are generally grouped like this or very similar. Of course my assumption is, as a designer you have artistic license and can arrange your page anyway that you want, while keeping the user experience in mind and keeping your code semantic.

However, many times I end up positioning my elements using the {position: absolute} property and completely disregarding the containing div. So my thought is if I have an H1 for example and I plan on positioning it as I've described, then why even bother putting it in a div?, and the same for any other element that I position it such a way. Why not have them as free standing elements? I'm wondering if it's still good to do so for semantic reasons, or if it's just considered best practice to group things this way. I hope that I've been clear in the way that I've described this.

Just to be as descriptive as I can, here is the css that I've applied so far to this particular iteration of this page. It's no where close to finished (obviously), but you can see a couple of the absolute positioning that I've applied to this header section.

/*global*/

* {
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
       -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
         -o-box-sizing: border-box;
            box-sizing: border-box;
}

html {
    height: 100%;
}

body {
    background: rgb(234, 234, 234);
}

body, .container {
    min-height: 100%;
}

.container {
    background: white;
    margin-top: 6.25em;
}

header {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0.625rem;
    background: transparent;
    text-align: center;

}

ul {
    list-style-type: none;
}

a {
    text-decoration: none;
}

/*typography*/

h1 {
    font-family: 'Parisienne', cursive;
    font-size: 2.5rem;
    color: #2713e7;
    position: relative;
    top: 1.25rem;

}

/*lists*/

.main-navigation {
    position: relative;
    top: 2.5rem;
}

.main-navigation li  {
    position: absolute;
    top: 10px;
    display: inline-block;
    margin-right: 10%;
    font-family: 'Atomic Age', cursive;
    font-size: 1.5625rem;

}

/*borders*/

.main-navigation {
    border: 2px solid black;
}

.main-navigation li  {
    display: inline-block;
    border: 2px solid black;


}
share|improve this question
    
The question is why are you using position: absolute rather than normal web layout techniques which generally don't need it except for a few special circumstances. Try making a responsive design with position: absolute for example. –  jfriend00 Oct 7 '13 at 2:38
    
Could you be a little more clear about what you mean by normal web layout techniques. I am aware of how to make a responsive design. I am still inexperienced though, and that's why I'm looking for advice. Your comment is a little vague and doesn't really clarify anything. –  MddHtt13 Oct 7 '13 at 2:42
    
Normal web layout techniques are using containing divs and some combination of margin, padding, alignment, float, etc... to cause things to be dynamically positioned as you'd like, but still allowing for things to auto-scale, auto-position based on the natural size of widgets and text, etc... –  jfriend00 Oct 7 '13 at 3:07
    
Thank you for trying to clear things up. I've done some more reading and I think I've cleared up my misconception. I have definitely not been using the position property how it was intended to be used. –  MddHtt13 Oct 7 '13 at 3:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1. So in the past few months I've taught myself web design.

Good job! Keep it up.

2. However, many times I end up positioning my elements using the {position: absolute} property and completely disregarding the containing div.

Not good, you don't want to position your element every time from the canvas. Do you? position: absolute will position an element based on it's nearest relatively positioned ancestor, if it doesn't have one you will have to position it according to the canvas.

3 So my thought is if I have an H1 for example and I plan on positioning it as I've described, then why even bother putting it in a div?, and the same for any other element that I position it such a way. Why not have them as free standing elements?

There are many ways to skin a cat, do what you feel most comfortable doing, thus said. You will not find many web designers doing this type of set up. And positioning each element on the page separately, because you will end up adding many, many classes to your document and that is a big no-no.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so it's {position: absolute} that should be used sparingly. Initially using such a method seemed like total freedom - I could place anything anywhere. However, then that started to raise the aforementioned questions. So am I to assume that instead I should be predominately positioning my elements using {position: relative}? –  MddHtt13 Oct 7 '13 at 2:58
    
Here check this article out. It will make you understand what I mean css-tricks.com/absolute-positioning-inside-relative-positioning also check this article out learn.shayhowe.com/html-css/box-model –  user2578173 Oct 7 '13 at 3:01
    
Thank you my friend, I appreciate your help. –  MddHtt13 Oct 7 '13 at 3:04
    
Sure, no problem. If you found my answer helpful, please accept it. –  user2578173 Oct 7 '13 at 3:04

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