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I have this code and it works with everything until the bottom middle button is pressed.

import java.awt.*;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.GridLayout;

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JLabel;

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

public class memory extends JFrame {

    /**
     *
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponents(g);
        g.setColor(new Color(156, 93, 82));
        g.fill3DRect(21, 3, 7, 12, true);
        g.setColor(new Color(156, 23, 134));
        g.fillOval(1, 15, 15, 15);
        g.fillOval(16, 15, 15, 15);
        g.fillOval(31, 15, 15, 15);
        g.fillOval(7, 31, 15, 15);
        g.fillOval(22, 31, 15, 15);
        g.fillOval(16, 47, 15, 15);
    }

    public memory() {

        GridLayout h = new GridLayout(3, 3);
        final JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        final JPanel pan = new JPanel(h);
        frame.add(pan);
        //pan=new JPanel(h);
        pan.setBackground(new Color(130, 224, 190));
        setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.BOLD, 28));
        JButton button1 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button1);
        final JLabel label1 = new JLabel("hi");
        label1.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label1);
        JButton button2 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button2);
        final JLabel label2 = new JLabel("hi");
        label2.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label2);
        JButton button3 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button3);
        final JLabel label3 = new JLabel("hi");
        label3.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label3);
        JButton button4 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button4);
        final JLabel label4 = new JLabel("hi");
        label4.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label4);
        JButton button5 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button5);
        final JLabel label5 = new JLabel("hi");
        label5.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label5);
        JButton button6 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button6);
        final JLabel label6 = new JLabel("hi");
        label6.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label6);
        JButton button7 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button7);
        final JLabel label7 = new JLabel("hi");
        label7.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label7);
        JButton button8 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button8);
        final JLabel label8 = new JLabel("hi");
        label8.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label8);
        JButton button9 = new JButton();
        pan.add(button9);
        final JButton button10 = new JButton("Exit");
        pan.add(button10);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setTitle("memory Game");
        setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        add(pan, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        add(button10, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        setSize(600, 600);
        setVisible(true);
        final JLabel label9 = new JLabel("hi");
        label9.setVisible(false);
        pan.add(label9);
        button1.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label1.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button2.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label2.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button3.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label3.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button4.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label4.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button5.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label5.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button6.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label6.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
        button7.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label7.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
//this is where I thought it was going to do something if it was pressed.
        button8.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label8.setVisible(true);
                frame.getContentPane().add(new memory());
                setVisible(true);

            }
        }
                );
        button9.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                label9.setVisible(true);
            }
        }
                );
        button10.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                if (button10.getSize() != null) {
                    System.exit(0);
                }
            }
        });

    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        new memory();
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
1- There is no paintComponent of JFrame... – MadProgrammer Oct 7 '13 at 3:13
    
sorry but how would you do that? – user2853125 Oct 7 '13 at 3:15

memory extends JFrame. Swing won't let you add a window to another window.

You should avoid extending from top level containers (this is just reason) and instead use something like JPanel.

This allows you to add the component to whatever container you like

JFrame does not have a paintComponent method, so it will never be called. The reason it compiles is that you've called super.paintComponents (note the s at the end).

Instead, you should, extend from something like JPanel and override it's paintComponent method and perform you custom painting from there

share|improve this answer
    
How do you override the paintComponent? Sorry i'm really new to this whole thing... – user2853125 Oct 7 '13 at 3:28
1  
@user2853125 Start by checking out Performing custom painting for more details – MadProgrammer Oct 7 '13 at 3:32
    
ok so I think I fixed it but it is now not opening so what should I do? All I did was change it to extend JPanel and add @Override on top of this line 'public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {' so what do I do? someone please help – user2853125 Oct 7 '13 at 3:47
1  
1- Make sure you are calling super.paintComponent and not super.paintComponents. Create an instance of a JFrame and add your memory component to it, make this frame visible. You might like to take a closer look at Creating a GUI with Swing – MadProgrammer Oct 7 '13 at 3:52

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