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What I need is to have a timer fire an event handler (say every second) which is in another class. This will be a small part of a Windows form program.

I have tried using a delegate to "call" an event handler, but I keep getting syntax errors. Can somebody steer me in the correct direction with a simple code example?

The code below is my start, the commented portion works fine but I want the event to fire when a Windows timer fires.

namespace WindowsFormsApplication3
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public event TimerHandler Tick;
        public EventArgs e = null;
        public delegate void TimerHandler(Timer t, EventArgs e);

        public class Timer
        {
            public event TimerHandler Tick;
            public EventArgs e = null;
            public delegate void TimerHandler(Timer t, EventArgs e);
        }

        public class Listener
        {
            public static int ticker = 0;
            public void Subscribe(Timer t)
            {
                t.Tick += new Timer.TimerHandler(HeardTick);
            }
            private void HeardTick(Timer t, EventArgs e)
            {
                //lblTimer.Text = ticker.ToString(); //Don't know how to change forms control
                ticker++;
            }
        }

        private void btnStart_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Timer t = new Timer();
            Listener l = new Listener();
            l.Subscribe(t);
            //t.Start();
        }

        public void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (Tick != null)
            {
                Tick(this, e); // "this" is incorrect, invalid argument
            }
        }
    }
}
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2  
show us your code!We would help you correct it.. – Anirudha Oct 7 '13 at 3:18
2  
Close-Voting: Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. – HighCore Oct 7 '13 at 3:18
    
Perhaps give the newbie a chance to edit his question before closing? :) – Jun Wei Lee Oct 7 '13 at 3:50
    
Remember when asking questions to specify what you have tried. This will help you get the answers you need. – BryanH Oct 7 '13 at 19:03
    
@JunWeiLee The point of closing a question is to give the author time to edit the question; if they are able to improve it then it can be reopened without the answer being harmed by low quality answers posted before it was in an answerable state. Leaving a question open when it's not ready to be answers is more harmful to the author than closing it quickly. – Servy Oct 7 '13 at 19:44

Is the other class static? Here is an example for each:

//Static class
Timer1.Tick += YourClass.DoStuff;

//Non-static class
YourClass MyInstance = new YourClass();
Timer1.Tick += MyInstance.DoStuff;

Just put the code in the constructor of your form.

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