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This is an example in Section 6.3.1 Comma Separated Lists Generated from Cell Arrays of the Octave documentation (I browsed it through the doc command on the Octave prompt) which I don't quite understand.

in{1} = [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90];
in{2} = inf;
in{3} = "last";
in{4} = "first";
out = cell(4, 1);
[out{1:3}] = find(in{1 : 3}); % line which I do not understand

So at the end of this section, we have in looking like:

in =
{
  [1,1] =
     10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
  [1,2] = Inf
  [1,3] = last
  [1,4] = first
}

and out looking like:

out =
{
  [1,1] =
    1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
  [2,1] =
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  [3,1] =
    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
  [4,1] = [](0x0)
}

Here, find is called with 3 output parameters (forgive me if I'm wrong on calling them output parameters, I am pretty new to Octave) from [out{1:3}], which represents the first 3 empty cells of the cell array out.

When I run find(in{1 : 3}) with 3 output parameters, as in:

[i,j,k] = find(in{1 : 3})

I get:

i = 1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1
j = 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
k = 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

which kind of explains why out looks like it does, but when I execute in{1:3}, I get:

ans = 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
ans = Inf
ans = last

which are the 1st to 3rd elements of the in cell array.

My question is: Why does find(in{1 : 3}) drop off the 2nd and 3rd entries in the comma separated list for in{1 : 3}?

Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The documentation for find should help you answer your question:

When called with 3 output arguments, find returns the row and column indices of non-zero elements (that's your i and j) and a vector containing the non-zero values (that's your k). That explains the 3 output arguments, but not why it only considers in{1}. To answer that you need to look at what happens when you pass 3 input arguments to find as in find (x, n, direction):

If three inputs are given, direction should be one of "first" or "last", requesting only the first or last n indices, respectively. However, the indices are always returned in ascending order.

so in{1} is your x (your data if you want), in{2} is how many indices find should consider (all of them in your case since in{2} = Inf) and {in3}is whether find should find the first or last indices of the vector in{1} (last in your case).

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am304, thanks for your explanation! –  yanhan Oct 8 '13 at 0:43

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