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UPDATE: Here is the solution, I added a scalar to each row to bring the underflow, overflow under control. Thanks for all the help guys.

I have been working on LU decomposition in c++ that hopefully one day will decompose and solve a large sparse matrix. I found some code and modified it for my own use but it will not work on big matrices. It works on matrices up to size 5 by 5. I need it to work for matrices of size 100 by 100 or more. I have checked my solutions in mat-lab and my code gives totally wrong results. I feel like the problem comes from the division in my code, and if so, any suggestions as to how to solve this would be greatly appreciated ans any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here is my code.

UPDATED:

 #include <algorithm>
 // **
 * END ***
 /*
 * LUDecomp.cpp
 #include <stdlib.h>
 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <math.h>
 #include <iostream>
 #include <fstream>
 #include <string.h>
 #include <iomanip>

 #include "LUDecomp.h"

 using namespace std;

 LUDecomp::LUDecomp()
 {
 }

 void LUDecomp::h_pivot_decomp(int MAT1, double a[], int p[], int q[])
 {
int i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
int n = MAT1;
int pi = 0, pj = 0, tmp = 0;
double max = 0.0;
double ftmp = 0.0;
//Stores the scaling of each row or column.
double* vv = new double[MAT1 + 5];

//Loop over rows toget the implicit scaling information.
max = 0.0;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {

        if ((ftmp = fabs(a(i,j))) > max)
        {
            max=ftmp;
        }
    }
    //No nonzero largest element.
                if (max == 0.0)
                {
                    throw("Singular matrix in LUdcmp");
                }
                //Save the scaling.
                vv[i]=1.0/max;

            }

        // The k element determines which pivot element you are in thereby
        // determining the submatrix starting at the upper left corner of the matrix.
for (k = 0; k < n; k++)
{

    // pi: stores row needing to be swapped.
    // pj: stores column needing to be swapped.
    // max: makes a zero element in the matrix into a very tiny number.
    pi = -1, pj = -1, max = TINY;

    //find pivot in submatrix a(k:n,k:n) by finding the absolute value of the biggest element.
    for (i = k; i < n; i++)
    {
        for (j = k; j < n; j++)
        {
            //j = k;
            ftmp = vv[i] * fabs(a(i,j));
            // Decides if current max is bigger than current element.
                    if (ftmp>max)
                    {
                        max = ftmp;
                        // Index of row being swapped.
                        pi=i;
                        // Index of column being swapped.
                        pj=j;
                    }
                }
            }

    {
        // Stores the permutation of row swaps.
        tmp = p[k];
        p[k] = p[pi];
        p[pi] = tmp;
    }

    //Swaps the scalling factor if needed.
    if (k != pi)
    {
        vv[pi] = vv[k];
        cout << "Scaling factor: " << vv[pi] << endl;
    }

    // Swaps the indicated rows to move the max pivot
    // element of the submatrix k into place.
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
        // The k and pi index stays the same so the row
        // number stays the same, the j changes to iterate threw the row.
        ftmp = a(k,j);
        a(k,j)=a(pi,j);
        a(pi,j)=ftmp;
        //cout << a(k,j) << " , " << a(pi,j) << endl;
            }

    {
        // Stores the permutation of column swaps.
        tmp = q[k];
        q[k] = q[pj];
        q[pj] = tmp;
        //cout << q[k] << " , " << q[pj] << endl;
    }

    // Swaps the indicated columns to move the max pivot
    // element of the submatrix k into place.
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        // The k and pj index stays the same so the column
        // number stays the same, the i changes to iterate threw the column.
        ftmp = a(i,k);
        a(i,k)=a(i,pj);
        a(i,pj)=ftmp;
        //cout << a(i,k) << " , " << a(i,pj) << endl;
            }
        // END PIVOT
    cout << fixed << showpoint;
    cout << setprecision(20);
    // Check pivot size and decompose
    if ((fabs(a(k,k))>TINY))
    {
        for (i=k+1;i<n;i++)
        {
            // Column normalisation, Does first element under pivot k row i.

            ftmp=a(i,k)/=a(k,k);

            cout << "k,k " <<a(k,k) << " , " << endl;
            // Does the rest of row i.
            for (j=k+1;j<n;j++)
            {
                //a(ik)*a(kj) subtracted from lower right submatrix elements
                a(i,j)-=(ftmp*a(k,j));
                //cout <<"i,j "<< a(i,j) << endl;
            }
        }
    }

}
    //END DECOMPOSE
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {

        cout << a(i,j)<<" ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}
 }

 void LUDecomp::h_solve(int MAT1, double a[], double x[], int p[], int q[])
 {
// Forward substitution; see  Golub, Van Loan 96
// And see http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~richter/cs510/completePivoting.pdf
int i = 0, ii = 0, j = 0;
double ftmp = 0.0;
double* xtmp = new double[MAT1 + 5];

cout << fixed << showpoint;
cout << setprecision(4);

// Swap rows
// Put be vector back like it should be by using the permutations from the row swapping.
for (i = 0; i < MAT1; i++)
{
    xtmp[i] = x[p[i]]; //value that should be here
    //cout << xtmp[i] << endl;
}

// Ly=b
for (i = 0; i < MAT1; i++)
{
    ftmp = xtmp[i];
    if (ii != 0)
        for (j = ii - 1; j < i; j++)
            ftmp -= a(i,j)*xtmp[j];

            else if (ftmp!=0.0)
            ii=i+1;

    xtmp[i] = ftmp;
    //cout << xtmp[i] << endl;
}

// Backward substitution
// Partially taken from Sourcebook on Parallel Computing p577
// Solves Ux=y
cout << "xtmp " << xtmp[MAT1 - 1] << " a " << a(MAT1-1,MAT1-1)<< endl;
xtmp[MAT1 - 1] /= a(MAT1-1,MAT1-1);
//cout << xtmp[MAT1 - 1] << endl;
for (i = MAT1 - 2; i >= 0; i--)
{
    ftmp = xtmp[i];
    //cout << "ftmp " << ftmp << endl;
    for (j = i + 1; j < MAT1; j++)
    {
        ftmp -= a(i,j)*xtmp[j];
        //cout << "ftmp in "<<ftmp << endl;
    }

    xtmp[i] = (ftmp) / a(i,i);

}

    // Last bit
    // Swap columns
    // Takes the final answer and puts it back into its proper order by
    // using the permutations from the column swapping.
for (i = 0; i < MAT1; i++)
{
    x[q[i]] = xtmp[i];
}

delete xtmp;
 }

 // Method to get output from the LU Decomposition.
 void LUDecomp::output(unsigned int MAT1, double a[], double b[])
 {

// Pivot array's for the permutation vectors.
int* p_pivot = new int[MAT1 + 5];
int* q_pivot = new int[MAT1 + 5];

// Sets the elements in the permutation vectors up to receive permutations.
// p_pivot is for row permutations and is initialized to {0,1,...,r};
// q_pivot is for column permutations and is initialized to {0,1,...,r};
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < MAT1; i++)
{
    p_pivot[i] = i;
    q_pivot[i] = i;
}

// Call to decomposition method passing (size,matrix to be decomposed, not used,   not used).
h_pivot_decomp(MAT1, a, p_pivot, q_pivot);

// Call to solve passing (size, matrix in LU form, b vector, not used, not used).
h_solve(MAT1, a, b, p_pivot, q_pivot);

// Have solution.
// Used for file output.
ofstream outFile;
// Allow for appenending to a file already created.
outFile.open("outSolMatrix.txt");

// Sets the precision of the output to the file.
outFile << fixed << showpoint;
outFile << setprecision(4);

// Output results to file answer is {0,1,...,n}.
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < MAT1; i++)
{
    outFile << i << " " << b[i] << endl;
}

outFile << "End" << endl;

delete p_pivot;
delete q_pivot;

outFile.close();
 }

The h file is here if you need to see it.

#ifndef LUDECOMP_H_
#define LUDECOMP_H_

class LUDecomp {

public:

#define a(i,j) a[(i)*MAT1+(j)]

const static double TINY = 1e-20;

LUDecomp();

void h_pivot_decomp(int MAT1, float *a, int *p, int *q);
void h_solve(int MAT1, float *a, float *x, int *p, int *q);
void output(unsigned int MAT1, float *a, float *b);

private:

};

#endif /* LUDECOMP_H_ */

Thanks again, let me know if you guys need to see anything else.

share|improve this question
2  
Is there any particular reason why you must implement your own LU factorization? If not, you might want to use the widely available libraries to do this for you. The reasons are: numerical methods such as this usually involves "tricks" that are necessary for numerical stability. The libraries (e.g., LAPACK, Armadillo etc.) are highly optimized for processor, parallel computing, large sparse matrices (100 is at most medium-size. Think 100000, or millions). Unless there is special requirement for an in-house implementation (schoolwork or self-learning), it it best to use those libraries. –  lightalchemist Oct 7 '13 at 4:46
    
Thanks for the reply. I definitely need this to work, so those tricks would be greatly appreciated, or a good place to locate how to do it. This actually ties into a much bigger problem that is using this method to solve partial differential equations in many loops, so any help would be appreciated, thanks. –  elijah123467 Oct 7 '13 at 17:39
1  
Firstly, I will still recommend you take a look at LAPACK, or some other interface for it such as Armadillo. A plus side to using numerical libraries such as Armadillo, besides what I have already mentioned, is that they have the proper data structure to house your matrices. Having said that, if you insist, I think the standard reference for numerical computings are: Matrix Computations (Gene Golub et al), Numerical Linear Algebra (Trefethen and Bau), and Numerical Recipes (available online).You might also want to have a copy of Numerical Optimization (Nocedal & wright) around. –  lightalchemist Oct 8 '13 at 1:43
    
Btw, Matrix Computations (Gene Golub) will definitely have what you want. But given as pseudo code. Same for Trefethen and Bau. Numerical Recipes have actual working code. However, while they are generally numerically stable, they are by no means optimized for speed, space etc. As I said earlier, you need to have a REALLY good data structure for your matrix, something that best exploits your memory layout and facilitates matrix multiplications etc. Furthermore, forget about doing 3 for loops for matrix mult. Look at Strassen's algorithm and its variants for sub-cubic mat mult. –  lightalchemist Oct 8 '13 at 1:47
    
Even after doing all the above, I still don't think you will cut it close (speed, memory...) to using LAPACK, Armadillo etc. I would strongly suggest you try to convince your "boss" or whoever to consider allowing you to use a standard numerical library, ESPECIALLY if what you are working on is meant for production. Those libs and algos have been in development for a long time, some as far back as the 60s. No way you can write production code alone that beat that. Heck, even Matlab uses them. –  lightalchemist Oct 8 '13 at 1:49
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1 Answer

Try to replace float by double. Float is not very good type for complex computations, because it is very small (only 4 bytes), so not exact (only 7-8 digits). So it is better to use double (8 bytes, 15-16 digits). But if you need more exact computatuions, you have to use another data structures for values (like in Matlab, Maple and other systems). See Arbitrary-precision arithmetic.

share|improve this answer
2  
Well, yes, up to a point. Switching from float to double doesn't (reliably) fix underlying numerical instabilities, it just hides them better. If instability is the cause of OP's problem the advice in @ligtalchemist's comment is much better. –  High Performance Mark Oct 7 '13 at 8:13
    
I have done that in another version of the code, it only minimized the problem, when the matrix is very big the solutions become quite wrong. Thanks. –  elijah123467 Oct 7 '13 at 17:42
1  
@elijah123467 You might want to check out the classic paper: What every computer scientist should know about floating-point. It might suggests possible places in your code that might be messing up due to over/underflow. That usually happens when the "errors" accumulate, as is the case when your matrix gets large. Just to be sure, you should check whether your problem is reproducible i.e. does it always give a stable solution for small matrices regardless of entries? If not the problem may not be solely due to size of matrix. Might be useful to debug along this line. –  lightalchemist Oct 9 '13 at 2:32
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