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Example, I wish to fill a 15 column matrix with the values 0.25,0.25,0.25,0.25,0,0,0 .....( 11 columns with zeros) so that all possible column combinations are filled. In this example I am using 4 columns with 0.25 and the other 11 col's with 0's.

Result should look like :-

0.25  0.25  0.25  0.25  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00 .......
0.25  0.25  0.25  0.00  0.25  0.00  0.00  0.00 .......
0.25  0.25  0.25  0.00  0.00  0.25  0.00  0.00 .......

 .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .   .......
 .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .   .......
0.25  0.25  0.00  0.25  0.25  0.00  0.00  0.00 .......
0.25  0.25  0.00  0.25  0.00  0.25  0.00  0.00 ....... etc, etc.  

When using "perms" (limited to 10 elements anyway ) it treats each "0" as if they are unique hence I get multiple rows that are the same. The "unique" function works fine if less than 10 elements but I need to use more than that. Appreciate any assistance, thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The function accumarray is your friend in this case. I'll do a simpler example - creating a six column matrix with exactly two columns filled and the rest zero.

First, we get the list of horizontal indices that you want to be filled using nchoosek

x = nchoosek(1:6, 2);

Now get the vertical coordinates

y = repmat((1:size(x,1))', 1, 2);

Finally, use accumarray to create the desired matrix

z = accummarray([y(:), x(:)], 0.5);

The result is

>> z
z =
    0.5000    0.5000         0         0         0         0
    0.5000         0    0.5000         0         0         0
    0.5000         0         0    0.5000         0         0
    0.5000         0         0         0    0.5000         0
    0.5000         0         0         0         0    0.5000
         0    0.5000    0.5000         0         0         0
         0    0.5000         0    0.5000         0         0
         0    0.5000         0         0    0.5000         0
         0    0.5000         0         0         0    0.5000
         0         0    0.5000    0.5000         0         0
         0         0    0.5000         0    0.5000         0
         0         0    0.5000         0         0    0.5000
         0         0         0    0.5000    0.5000         0
         0         0         0    0.5000         0    0.5000
         0         0         0         0    0.5000    0.5000

Packaging it up as a function, you get

function z = combinations(N, K)

    x = nchoosek(N, K);
    y = repmat((1:size(x,1))', 1, K);
    z = accumarray([y(:), x(:)], 1);

end
share|improve this answer
    
very nice, +1 ... (you have a typo in the 3rd row of code (accummarray...) ) –  natan Oct 7 '13 at 7:03
    
Nice spot, thanks. –  Chris Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 7:07
    
Thank you both for responding. Solutions work well. Importantly I have learned, and was a good experience. Great site. –  Kevin Connor Oct 9 '13 at 11:16

you can use combn from the file exchange.

For example:

c      = combn([0 0.25],15);  
ind    = find(sum(c')==1);
Result = c(ind,:)

The tactic here is probably an overkill but it's so simple and easy to implement, I thought to myself, why not?

First, get all possible combinations of 0 and 0.25 for a vector of length 15 (there are 2^15 of those), as done in the first line, where we obtain a [2^15 x 15] matrix (c). Then we find rows in c of that sum up to 1, meaning that the value 0.25 appears exactly four times. Then, use this back in c and Voilà!

If you want to obtain c yourself (without combn), this is how to do it:

V = [0 0.25];
a = [0:2^15-1]+(1/2) ;
b = [2.^(1-15:0)] ;
id = rem( floor((a(:) * b(:)')) , 2 ) + 1 ;
c = V(id) ; 
share|improve this answer
    
I would be worried about this method, for two reasons - first, it creates a very large matrix (c) when only a small subsetof it will eventually be required. If you use larger arguments (e.g. 32 and 9 instead of 11 and 4) you will blow the available memory. Secondly, it relies on floating point arithmetic. Try creating a matrix with 11 columns, of which exactly 7 are filled with 1/7 and 4 of which are zero. –  Chris Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 7:06
    
I agree that this is an overkill (and also said so in the answer). as for floating point accuracy, the better thing to do to begin with, is use a binary matrix (logicals), the actual value 0.25 or whatever, is not important here. Still 0.25+0.25+0.25+0.25+0.25==1.25 works and one can istead use other conditions. The best argument for accumarray is that it is faster and more elegant. –  natan Oct 7 '13 at 7:13
    
Agreed, you can easily get around the floating point problem - a logical matrix would solve it easily. –  Chris Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 7:16

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