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I've noticed that the level of nested using statements has lately increased in my code. The reason is probably because I use more and more of async/await pattern, which often adds at least one more using for CancellationTokenSource or CancellationTokenRegistration.

So, how to reduce the nesting of using, so the code doesn't look like Christmas tree? Similar questions have been asked on SO before, and I'd like to sum up what I've learnt from the answers.

Use adjacent using without indentation. A fake example:

using (var a = new FileStream())
using (var b = new MemoryStream())
using (var c = new CancellationTokenSource())
{
    // ... 
}

This may work, but often there's some code between using (e.g. it may be too early to create another object):

// ... 
using (var a = new FileStream())
{
    // ... 
    using (var b = new MemoryStream())
    {
        // ... 
        using (var c = new CancellationTokenSource())
        {
            // ... 
        }
    }
}

Combine objects of the same type (or cast to IDisposable) into single using, e.g.:

// ... 
FileStream a = null;
MemoryStream b = null;
CancellationTokenSource c = null;
// ...
using (IDisposable a1 = (a = new FileStream()), 
    b1 = (b = new MemoryStream()), 
    c1 = (c = new CancellationTokenSource()))
{
    // ... 
}

This has the same limitation as above, plus is more wordy and less readable, IMO.

Refactor the method into a few methods.

This is a preferred way, as far as I understand. Yet, I'm curious, why would the following be considered a bad practice?

public class DisposableList : List<IDisposable>, IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        base.ForEach((a) => a.Dispose());
        base.Clear();
    }
}

// ...

using (var disposables = new DisposableList())
{
    var a = new FileStream();
    disposables.Add(a);
    // ...
    var b = new MemoryStream();
    disposables.Add(b);
    // ...
    var c = new CancellationTokenSource();
    disposables.Add(c);
    // ... 
}

[UPDATE] There are quite a few valid points in the comments that nesting using statements makes sure Dispose will get called on each object, even if some inner Dispose calls throw. However, there is a somewhat obscure issue: all nested exceptions possibly thrown by disposing of nested 'using' frames will be lost, besides the most outer one. More on this here.

share|improve this question
1  
You can try techniques like method extraction. I mean try to divide this particular method into small independent parts and move them into methods. This way you might be able to move this multiple using blocks into different methods. – Muctadir Oct 7 '13 at 5:41
3  
Usually, if you use more than, let's say, 2 nested using statements, your method is a bit too complex anyway, so refactoring is required anyway. If you more ore less follow the 'clean code' principle you usually don't end up in nesting too many using statements. @MuctadirDinar: Same thoughts! – alzaimar Oct 7 '13 at 5:42
1  
I typically find that 3 is about the most I'll ever nest, and I find the normal nested indentation perfectly readable, and clearer than any of the other alternatives you bring up. Maybe after 4 or 5 it might get a little screwy, but even then, I'd rather have obvious code that's a little bit long than a non-standard pattern to research when I'm reading the code. Monitors these days are generally pretty wide, so I wouldn't worry too much about horizontal space. – Joe Enos Oct 7 '13 at 6:10
    
Yep. Consider refactoring in the extreme case. The code usually requires comments anyway and refactoring (split into methods) is the ideal way to both comment the code and make it more readable. – alzaimar Oct 7 '13 at 6:25
2  
3 is clearly bad: it requires special effort to not forget to dispose object while writing code and produces unusual code that is much harder to read. Side note: as it is show in question 3 variant suffer from chance of never disposing some objects if earlier Dispose throws an exception. – Alexei Levenkov Oct 7 '13 at 6:28
up vote 12 down vote accepted

In a single method, the first option would be my choice. However in some circumstances the DisposableList is useful. Particularly, if you have many disposable fields that all need to be disposed of (in which case you cannot use using). The implementation given is good start but it has a few problems (pointed out in comments by Alexei):

  1. Requires you to remember to add the item to the list. (Although you could also say you have to remember to use using.)
  2. Aborts the disposal process if one of the dispose methods throws, leaving the remaining items un-disposed.

Let's fix those problems:

public class DisposableList : List<IDisposable>, IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (this.Count > 0)
        {
            List<Exception> exceptions = new List<Exception>();

            foreach(var disposable in this)
            {
                try
                {
                    disposable.Dispose();
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    exceptions.Add(e);
                }
            }
            base.Clear();

            if (exceptions.Count > 0)
                throw new AggregateException(exceptions);
        }
    }

    public T Add<T>(Func<T> factory) where T : IDisposable
    {
        var item = factory();
        base.Add(item);
        return item;
    }
}

Now we catch any exceptions from the Dispose calls and will throw a new AggregateException after going through all the items. I've added a helper Add method that allows a simpler usage:

using (var disposables = new DisposableList())
{
    var file = disposables.Add(() => File.Create("test"));
    // ...
    var memory = disposables.Add(() => new MemoryStream());
    // ...
    var cts = disposables.Add(() => new CancellationTokenSource());
    // ... 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great point about aggregating exceptions and a neat piece of code on its own, especially factoring. – Noseratio Oct 7 '13 at 7:31
    
Interestingly, aggregating exceptions is different from the standard behavior of nested using, where some exceptions may apparently get lost. – Noseratio Oct 8 '13 at 3:21
    
@Noseratio I'm not surprised. That is the behavior defined in the spec. That is often very hard to debug because the exception you see is not the cause of the problem. I'd argue the behavior above will actually make it easier to debug such problems if they do arise. – mike z Oct 8 '13 at 3:47
1  
@Noseratio Actually strike my last sentence. The AggregateException could still hide the source of your problems. Since we have no access to the exception that caused us to enter the list's Dispose, you need to decide whether it is worth it to swallow the Dispose exceptions or not. I agree with Marc Gravell's statement here, that generally the original exception is the interesting one. I would at least try to log them in any case. – mike z Oct 8 '13 at 4:06
    
Here is my attempt to avoid swallowing or replacing the inner exceptions, @mikez. – Noseratio Oct 9 '13 at 2:32

You should always refer to your fake example. When this is not possible, like you mentioned, then it is very likely that you can refactor the inner content into a separate method. If this also does not make sense you should just stick to your second example. Everything else just seems like less readable, less obvious and also less common code.

share|improve this answer

I would stick to the using blocks. Why?

  • It clearly shows your intentions with these objects
  • You don't have to mess around with try-finally blocks. It's error prone and your code gets less readable.
  • You can refactor embedded using statements later (extract them to methods)
  • You don't confuse your fellow programmers including a new layer of abstractions by creating your own logic
share|improve this answer

Another option is to simply use a try-finally block. This might seem a bit verbose, but it does cut down unnecessary nesting.

FileStream a = null;
MemoryStream b = null;
CancellationTokenSource c = null;

try
{
   a = new FileStream();
   // ... 
   b = new MemoryStream();
   // ... 
   c = new CancellationTokenSource();
}
finally 
{
   if (a != null) a.Dispose();
   if (b != null) b.Dispose();
   if (c != null) c.Dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
6  
As you should use using I would not recommend this. This is a trick to avoid nesting, i.e. personal taste. Don't use tricks. There is actually nothing bad with nesting itself. – alzaimar Oct 7 '13 at 6:23
1  
+0. Your suggestion have the same problem as option 3 in the question - it requires special effort to not forget to dispose object while writing code and produces unusual code that is much harder to read (in addition your suggestion encourages copy-paste which adds risk of more errors). Both version suffer from chance of never disposing some objects if earlier Dispose throws an exception. – Alexei Levenkov Oct 7 '13 at 6:25
1  
@alzaimar Why "should" one use a using statement? It is merely a short hard form of a try-finally block provided for convenience. The use of either is personal taste and i did not suggest nesting was a bad thing, I am merely replying to the OP's desire to do so. – codemonkeh Oct 7 '13 at 6:36
2  
This is best option for me. As it clearly shows what is used, what required to be disposed. Also Using statement is just a Short Cut for try & Finally block. It just improves coding readability than try & finally. So its up to the programmer what is easy to read for him, and this is different for each programmer. – CreativeManix Oct 7 '13 at 8:55
3  
-1: Your method fails to clean up resources in the event that one of the earlier calls to Dispose throws an exception. You have defeated the entire purpose of the using statement. – Sam Harwell Oct 8 '13 at 4:37

Your last suggestion hides the fact that a, b and c should be disposed explicitly. That`s why it's ugly.

As mentioned in my comment, if you'd use clean code principles you wouldn't run into these problems (usually).

share|improve this answer
    
I tend to agree, but please elaborate how is that different from my second code fragment (nested using each with curly braces)? Do you mean the separation makes the disposal more explicit? – Noseratio Oct 7 '13 at 5:59
1  
Try not to use tricks to avoid the nesting. Ask yourself: "Is it readable? Would my colleague understand the code without asking?" If the answer is 'yes' in both cases, everything is ok. If you tend to comment your code, split it. This technique avoids too many nesting levels in most cases. – alzaimar Oct 7 '13 at 6:22

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