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Is there a method, or some other light-weight way, to check if a reference is to a disposed object?

P.S. - This is just a curiousity (sleep well, not in production code). Yes, I know I can catch the ObjectDisposedException upon trying to access a member of the object.

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4  
Dunno. It seems curious that there isn't an bool IsDisposed { get; } declaration on System.IDisposable. –  nicodemus13 Aug 9 '12 at 12:30
    
@nicodemus13: The Dispose method directs an object to release any and all resources it has acquired but not yet released. If an object never holds resources, its Dispose method generally won't have to do anything; if the type declares void IDisposable.Dispose() {}; it can otherwise ignore IDisposable with no per-instance overhead. An IsDisposed property which was expected to become true following any Dispose call would necessitate adding an otherwise-unnecessary Boolean flag to every instance of many types that could otherwise ignore Dispose. –  supercat Dec 7 '13 at 22:54
    
But, wherever you call a method on an object that implements IDisposable, how can you check whether it's been disposed of first? Rather than assuming it isn't and catching an exception? Or somehow you're meant to manage the lifetime so that you should always know whether it's disposed or not? –  nicodemus13 Dec 16 '13 at 14:30
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6 Answers 6

up vote -6 down vote accepted

It depends, there are IDisposable objects that allow to call the Dispose method as much as you want, and there are IDisposable objects that throw ObjectDisposedException. In such a case these objects must track the state (usually implemented with a private boolean field isDisposed).

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No this is wrong: the MSDN documentation for IDisposable.Dispose states that implementations must not throw an exception if Dispose is called multiple times. ObjectDisposedException can be thrown when other instance methods are called after Dispose. –  Joe Oct 10 '08 at 17:22
3  
Allow a Dispose method to be called more than once without throwing an exception. The method should do nothing after the first call: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e.aspx –  Dandikas Oct 10 '08 at 18:44
6  
Dispose (and also finalizers) should be callable multiple times without throwing an exception. The ObjectDisposedExcpetions should only occur when you try to use that object (access other properties or methods) after it has been disposed. –  Scott Dorman Oct 17 '08 at 8:43
1  
The question is not about disposing an object multiple times. The question is about accessing any other field/property/method of a disposed object (which MAY raise an ObjectDisposedException according to how the pattern has been implemented). –  Stefano Ricciardi Jul 27 '11 at 16:04
3  
The question is not about how to imlement the IDisposable properly. The question is how to deal with already implemented classes. –  Michael Damatov Nov 7 '11 at 13:33
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No - default implementation of IDisposable pattern does not support it

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System.Windows.Forms.Control has an IsDisposed property which is set to true after Dispose() is called. In your own IDisposable objects, you can easily create a similar property.

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The OP was looking to see if there is a similar property already on objects that he is not creating. This would be a good idea for objects we create, but most disposable classes in .NET do not follow this convention. Dandikas' answer is correct. –  krillgar May 29 at 15:07
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If it is not your class and it doesn't provide an IsDisposed property (or something similar - the name is just a convention), then you have no way of knowing.

But if it is your class and you are following the canonical IDisposable implementation, then just expose the _disposed or _isDisposed field as a property and check that.

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There is nothing built in that will allow this. You would need to expose an IsDisposed boolean property that reflects an internal disposed flag.

public class SimpleCleanup : IDisposable
{
    private bool disposed = false;

    public bool IsDisposed
    {
       get
       {
          return disposed;
       }
    }

    public SimpleCleanup()
    {
        this.handle = /*...*/;
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
               // free only managed resources here
            }

            // free unmanaged resources here
            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }
}
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What I like to do is declare the objects without initializing them, but set their default values to Nothing. Then at the end of the loop I write: If anObject IsNot Nothing then anObject.Dispose()

Public Sub Example()
    Dim inputPdf As PdfReader = Nothing, inputDoc As Document = Nothing, outputWriter As PdfWriter = Nothing

    'code goes here that may or may not end up using all three objects, 
    ' such as when I see that there aren't enough pages in the pdf once I open  
    ' the pdfreader and then abort by jumping to my cleanup routine using a goto ..

GoodExit:
    If inputPdf IsNot Nothing Then inputPdf.Dispose()
    If inputDoc IsNot Nothing Then inputDoc.Dispose()
    If outputWriter IsNot Nothing Then outputWriter.Dispose()
End Sub

This also works great for putting your main objects at the top of a routine, and then using them inside a try routine, and then disposing them in a finally block.

Private Sub Test()
    Dim aForm As System.Windows.Forms.Form = Nothing
    Try
        Dim sName As String = aForm.Name  'null ref should occur
    Catch ex As Exception
        'got null exception, no doubt
    Finally
        'proper disposal occurs, error or no error, initialized or not..
        If aForm IsNot Nothing Then aForm.Dispose()
    End Try
End Sub
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1  
@LarsHöppner: The essence of the question is language-agnostic, and good C# developers should probably know at least enough VB.NET to read the above code (and VB.NET developers should likewise learn enough C# to read C# code that doesn't do anything particularly exotic). –  supercat Dec 7 '13 at 22:55
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