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Evolving Question

My original question was Header margin causes mysterious vertical scroll bar to appear. This was partly due to the fact that what I was trying to achieve was a bit clouded in unsolved complications. I chose a simple question expressing one of the complications. Now, after several feedback cycles, I've been able to improve my question because I now have a better handle on the overall problem I'm trying to solve. This has been my experience on other StackExchange forums. It's better to evolve a question and keep the results on one page than it is to spread little detailed questions all over the place, each of which ends up with a lot of repeated information.

Conclusion

The main question now is about how to properly box the different sections of the whole page. So, I've rewritten the title to clarify this and hopefully now the question is more interesting or appropriate. Even though I've studied this in the CSS2.1 documentation and read all kinds of advice about the wrongs of using frames and tables to structure your pages I was still unclear about how exactly to achieve this. In trying out the latest answer from Zemljoradnik, where he has applied the relationship between position: absolute and 'position: relative', this finally clicked for me. What I've been able to achieve now extending the ideas in his solution can be seen here.

History

Here I have numbered my previous statements/questions and am commenting on them in the light of my experience since posting the original question.

(1) I had a feeling that the problem would have been caused by the 100% setting, but the reason I was using it is due to the answer to another question at webmasters about keeping a footer at the bottom of the window even when the page itself hadn't got much content. The use of overflow:hidden is not really a solution because when you have enough content to need vertical scrolling you've lost it.

Comment on (1): Correct.

(2) Does this mean that there is no really good CSS3 compliant solution for having footers adhering to the bottom of the window when the view rectangle is only partly full of content? If that's the case, then I'll stop trying to do it, because I want to create a web site that uses only the latest in thinking from the W3C.

Comments on (2): I honestly believe that there's nothing wrong with wanting a header attached to the top of the view and a footer attached to the bottom with both visible at all times and having the contents in between scrolling vertically when necessary. This works well in the main computer browser situation. If exceptionally small windowed devices is a problem, you can create a separate set of styles and use the media: media-type option. This rather than compromising one solution with another.

(3) I realise of course that I don't have to have the margin: 2px. Rather than pasting code in here, I guess anyone can see it from their browser anyway, the following link is the result of my own bottom attached footer without the margin.

Footer Experiment

Comments on (3): The answer by Zemljoradnik shows this is easily solved. With his help I've been able to take this one step further. I now have a header absolute at the top and a footer absolute at the bottom and the main contents scrolling in between. This gives a consistent look as the scrollbar doesn't interfere with the shape of the header and footer.

(4) My original question may have seemed a simple question at first but it's tangled up with solving other problems and I feel I should point out that I'm not just a newbie to computers or mathematics or discussing them on internet forums and I was purposefully providing a MWE which has now been taken apart by someone else's edit. I took a lot of trouble to isolate the relevant styles required to run my program and place them in the header. I normally use .css files but thought it was easier to place them in the <head> to paste in this question for the sake of presenting a fully working example, which is normally what answerers prefer.

It's a pity there seems to be no protocol for discussing suggested edits before they are made. StackExchange in general makes a show of being democratic, surely this goes with that. I'm also not sure why the question was migrated here from webmasters, as that is ironically where I got the idea for this experiment in the first place.

Comments on (4): I stand by these comments because some of the points mentioned there are off putting to new users, who not necessarily novices, just new here. It's much better to advise how to improve a question than it is to just immediately edit over the top of someone without discussion or denigrate a question by not voting for it or ignoring it altogether without providing some helpful advice. Again, that is what I've learnt from maths.se and tex.se.

Original Question Body

(5) Does anyone know why adding a non zero margin to the top most <div> causes a vertical scroll bar to appear even when the page is nearly empty. I've been experimenting with the following code for various reasons and it took me a while to realise it's the margin: 2px; in my <header> that's causing this weirdness. If you remove that line the problem goes away. It happens with Safari and Firefox. I'm working on a Mac.

If, while you're at it, you see anything suspect in my other code please let me know. I've been on the verge of asking a variety of questions today already but either sorted myself out or found the answers here by searching around. I'm keen to follow all the latest W3C guidelines and so on.

Comments on (5): This is not a stupid question. I also asked for comments on my code in general which I also thought wasn't a stupid question. Zemljoradnik has been very helpful in this regard and I thank him.

(6)

CSS

footer_thing.css

html, body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    height: 100%;
}
header.topic {
    border: 1px solid black;
    padding: 4px;
    background-color: #99CC99;
    width: auto;
    margin: 2px;
}
footer.topic {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    border: 1px solid black;
    padding: 4px;
    background-color: #99CC99;
    height: 30px; /* Height of the footer */
}
span.boxed_links {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    padding: 4px;
    width: auto;
    border: 1px solid black;
    margin-left: 80px;
    background-color: #FFF7CA;
}
a.top_link {
    font-family: sans-serif;
    font-weight: normal;
    font-size: 75%;
}
p.explain {
    max-width: 15cm;
    text-indent: 1.5em;
    padding: 4px;
    background-color: #FFCC33;
}

HTML

<html>
    <head>
        <title>
            Footer That Stays Put
        </title>
        <style media="screen" type="text/css">
            @import "footer_thing.css";
    </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <header class="topic">
            <span class="boxed_links">
                <a class="top_link" href="">
                    Home
                </a>
                |
                <a class="top_link" href="">
                    Topics
                </a>
            </span>
        </header>
        <p class="explain">
        What's with the vertical scroll bar, there's hardly anything here?
        </p>
    </body>
</html>

Comments on (6): I was a bit miffed that I had to put back in some code to the above after some of it was chopped out entirely when it was edited, so I've fixed it to that the html part is complete working code. I won't paste full examples again. I have my own web site, so it's easy for me to just provide a link to the working page concerned.

share|improve this question
    
Okay, as this question has progressed I've edited it several times. I hope now it's in a reasonably clear shape and has led to the exposition of a solution to an important question. I'm sure this could have could been answered by traipsing about with search engines and trial and error but Zemljoradnik has very quickly led me to an improved understanding of this situation. –  Geoff Pointer Oct 9 '13 at 4:10
    
@Zemljoradnik I've included a link to my latest CSS experiment. If you have time would you mind casting a quick eye over it to make sure I've understood what you've explained so far. It would also be nice if you could either let me know if the question is now worthy of up voting or advise me on how it could be improved. Cheers –  Geoff Pointer Oct 9 '13 at 4:12
    
Yes, that's basically it. Whenever you have a relatively positioned element, all it's absolutely positioned descendants are positioned relatively to it. And if you have a relatively positioned element inside relatively positioned element, it becomes a world inside the world (it's absolutely positioned descendants are positioned in regard to id, and not the outer relatively positioned element). But note that this is only one way of making a page structure, it's good for your situation, but for other website layouts this could be the wrong approach. So your title may be misleading. –  Zemljoradnik Oct 9 '13 at 8:44
    
As for the structure of your question... I got burned because I didn't completely understand the way SO works, so I asked this question on Meta Stack Overflow. Read all the answers and comments and you'll see why in the end I edited my question to say that I was wrong. –  Zemljoradnik Oct 9 '13 at 8:49
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migrated from webmasters.stackexchange.com Oct 7 '13 at 9:40

This question came from our site for pro webmasters.

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You gave your html and body elements 100% height, that means they already take the entire window height (html takes 100% of window, and body takes 100% of html). When you add a margin to one of it's children, that margin adds up to a total height of body element, making it's height 100% window height + 2px.

EDIT: You can make the footer stick to the bottom of the page. This is the way to do it:

<div id="scrollable-contanier">
    <header>
        <span class="boxed_links">
            <a class="top_link" href="">
                Home
            </a>
            |
            <a class="top_link" href="">
                Topics
            </a>
        </span>
    </header>
    <div id="content">
        <p class="explain">
            You can put as much content as you like in here, the fooret will stay locked to the bottom, and the rest of the page will have a scrollbar when needed.
        </p>
    </div>
</div>
<footer>
</footer>

CSS:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
    margin: 0;
}

#scrollable-contanier {
    position: absolute;
    top: 2px;
    left: 2px;
    right: 2px;
    bottom: 34px;
    overflow-y: auto;
}

header {
    height: 30px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    padding: 4px;
    background-color: #99CC99;
}

footer {
    position: absolute;
    height: 30px;
    left: 2px;
    right: 2px;
    bottom: 2px;
    background-color: #99CC99;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/P75f9/

This way you are exploiting the relation between position: relative and position: absolute, where absolutely positioned element always positions itself relatively to it's first relatively positioned ancestor. So, by giving body element 100% height and width (that way it's height and width do not depend on it' content, but stretch to fit the window), you can use top, bottom, left and right attributes to position elements anywhere you want in the window.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. Any suggestions? Please see my question for further elaboration. –  Geoff Pointer Oct 7 '13 at 11:50
    
@Geoff Pointer Look at the edit to my answer. –  Zemljoradnik Oct 8 '13 at 9:01
    
So far I'm favouring this answer as it addresses my larger picture. You've given me some insight into the positioning aspect. It seems there are some catch 22s to using CSS. The original solution I found used a container for the whole page but then the contents of the container have to be absolute inside the relative container leaving tricky problems with the container's relationship to the body. You're making the body relative and the container and footer as separate absolute items, which seems to work well. Given how tricky this is, why do you think my question is not deemed of any worth? –  Geoff Pointer Oct 8 '13 at 14:14
    
Also, I noticed that overflow: auto; works, why have you used overflow-y? –  Geoff Pointer Oct 8 '13 at 14:17
    
If I understand you correctly, you are asking me why I didn't upvote your question? The way I see it, you should upvote a question (or an answer for that matter) if you find it helpful. I think there are dozens of questions on SO on this very subject, it's just that it's sometimes hard to find the answer to your problem, because you don't know what the problem is. I'm not much of an upvoter, I do it when a question or an answers helps me. This site is not about voting, it's about finding and giving help. –  Zemljoradnik Oct 9 '13 at 8:22
show 3 more comments

Like this please remove html,body height:100%; or solution no. 2 : add overflow:hidden;

demo

css

html, body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    height: 100%;
    overflow:hidden;
}

OR

demo1

css

html,body{
margin:0;
padding:0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are these the only possibilities? Please see my question for further elaboration. –  Geoff Pointer Oct 7 '13 at 11:49
add comment

Instead of a top margin on the first element in the body, use a padding on the body itself and adjust for that with box-sizing.

So in your CSS, the body gets

margin: 0;
padding: 2px 0 0;
-webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
-moz-box-sizing:border-box;
box-sizing:border-box;

and header.topic gets

margin: 0 2px 2px;

That is all.

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
I'm currently, when I find time away from teaching and studying, burrowing through the CSS2.1 documentation. Any chance you could briefly explain webkit-box-sizing:border-box;,-moz-box-sizing:border-box; and box-sizing:border-box;? I'm trying to understand why using the padding on the <body> and having a zero top-margin on the top <div> doesn't work. –  Geoff Pointer Oct 7 '13 at 22:33
1  
box-sizing controls how the sizes (the box's height and width) are calculated from the height and width properties. Normally, those properties don't include the padding or the border, so if height is 100% and padding is 10px, then the total height of the box will be 100%+10px. However, if you set box-sizing to padding-box, the padding will be included, so the total height will be 100%. See developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/box-sizing –  Mr Lister Oct 8 '13 at 6:53
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