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#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main() {

    int i, j=0, k, N;
    printf("Enter the number");
    scanf("%d",&N);

    for(int i=1, j=sqrt(N); i<=j; i+=1)
        printf("%d",i);

    printf("%d",j);

    return 0;
}

The above program gives error when compiled with gcc -o sample 1.c -lm. However when compiled with gcc -o sample 1.c -lm -std=c99, it executes well.

Can someone clarify why this happens ? Also where can I find the differences between all the versions of unix ?

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closed as off-topic by RedX, Mark, StoryTeller, Bart, qrdl Oct 7 '13 at 10:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – RedX, StoryTeller, qrdl
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
"gives error".. What error? –  Michael Oct 7 '13 at 9:46
    
To know the actual error messages would be nice. Please edit the question to include the complete and unedited error messages. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 7 '13 at 9:46
    
Different standards allow for different syntax. -1 for not googling the meaning of the std flag. –  StoryTeller Oct 7 '13 at 9:47
    
I'm guessing you're getting (re)declaration errors? (Especially given that you say C99 works fine) –  Bart Oct 7 '13 at 9:48
    
Please give details of the error... Meanwhile you are declaring i twice ... don't declare it inside the for loop if you have already declared it before –  sukhvir Oct 7 '13 at 9:48

4 Answers 4

Variable declaration in for loops is allowed only since C99. Hence, it compiles fine.

In C89 mode, it'd complain about the declaration about i in the for loop and possibly redeclaration of i.

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You define twice int i, you dont' have permission for do it.Please remove int in loop for.

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:see sukhvir's answer. –  Arya Oct 7 '13 at 10:05

for (int i = 0; ...) is C99 extension.

int i; for (i = 0; ...) is C89 extension.

Adding -std=c99 it compiles successfully because GCC allows it as a GNU extension, even though it's not part of the C99 standard.

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Hi Guys, I was mainly asking for where can I find the differences between C89 and C99 standards. I got the answer from googling it. Please see the link below: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/standards You can find all the differences between c89 and c99 standards. –  Sarwan Oct 7 '13 at 10:18

This should fix the error :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main() {

    int i, j=0, k, N;
    printf("Enter the number");
    scanf("%d",&N);

    for(i=1, j=sqrt(N); i<=j; i+=1)
       printf("%d",i);

    printf("%d",j);

    return 0;
}

Edit:

As correctly pointed out by @purisima .. declaring twice isn't causing the error .. but declaring i inside the for loop is causing the error. Your compiler overides it when you use the C99 standard as it is acceptable in C99.

Also even if your compiler doesn't give error for redeclaration .. its still not a good practice. Declare your variables once only ( especially if they are going to be of same type ).

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declaring i twice is not giving compile error. –  Arya Oct 7 '13 at 9:56
1  
If we remove int i declared at start of {...} , then also compiler gives same error. Re-declaration error is different than c99 standard declaration error. –  Arya Oct 7 '13 at 9:59

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