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I'm working with the Shape5.com Corporate Response Joomla template and been asked to make a change to the color of the four icons for social media in the upper right-hand corner. The demo of this template can be found here:

http://www.shape5.com/demo/corporate_response/

Their CSS for each icon looks like this from the template.css file. I'm just including the first icon to keep this brief, which is for RSS:

#s5_rss {
height:23px;
width:22px;
background:url(../images/rss.png) no-repeat top left;
cursor:pointer;
margin-left:8px;
float:right;
}

#s5_rss:hover {
background:url(../images/rss.png) no-repeat bottom left;
}

The rss.png is here:

http://www.shape5.com/demo/corporate_response/templates/corporate_response/images/rss.png

I've been asked to use CSS to change the active/hover color from what it is now to red. I'm not sure if this can be done with CSS or not. Can it? Or does this require a new .png file created with the image by the designer to be the desired red color?

I'd also like to understand why this rss.png file has two images of the icon inside of it at different shades and how does the CSS toggle between them to know which to use for hover? Is this a special .png file that allows this, perhaps in a different format than most .png files? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

The image is known as a sprite image: a single image file consisting of multiple sprites which you apply as a single background image, and position according to the constraints set by the width and height properties on an element. It's just a regular PNG image and is not intrinsically different from other PNG images.

As for actually changing the color of the image to red, that is not something you can do with CSS alone depending on what you mean by "changing the color" — the safest bet is to modify the image to add a new sprite with the desired color. Since it's just a regular PNG image it's a simple matter of extending the canvas another 23 pixels down, rendering the new sprite in the extra space that's created, and modifying your CSS so it looks like this:

#s5_rss:hover {
background:url(../images/rss.png) no-repeat center left;
}

#s5_rss:active {
background:url(../images/rss.png) no-repeat bottom left;
}

You can also replace the background:url(../images/rss.png) no-repeat portion with background-position: in your :hover and :active rules as you're really only modifying the background position when using a sprite in CSS:

#s5_rss:hover {
background-position:center left;
}

#s5_rss:active {
background-position:bottom left;
}
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Experimental CSS filters are up around the horizon, but without good cross-browser support, you're basically out of luck on that front. If you can handle reduced browser support, go take a look at this overview of CSS filters.

Your current code shows only half the rss.png which conveniently is the exact height of just one of the sub-images within it. When you declare the background: you're telling it to stick the image from the top and hide the bottom half.

On hover, you're instructing it to draw just the bottom half of the image (the hovered state part). To make it a different color, you pretty much need to edit the file (short of having the background image partially transparent and showing a red background through it).

Overall, there's nothing magical going on, just well-documented magic that we all share and use every day.

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Currently there is no way to change the colours within an image using css and likely there will either never be or a long way off. There is the potential to do a color overlay but this would not help unless the image you were dealing with was a block colour.

In order to change the color you will need a separate image to reference on the hover styling rule for that element.

The alternative way to do this is to use a sprite, where all the images are loaded as one image and css just focuses on a portion of it depending on the state ie hover, active etc. This is what you mentioned earlier. Have a look at the following links for information on using a sprite, but put simply if you have a 40*40px social icon. You would create a 40*80 image and then in css say use the top half for normal and the bottom for hover. This actually saves time when loading your page and you should always try and use sprites where ever possible, remember the faster the page the better for the user.

http://css-tricks.com/css-sprites/ (good guide on sprites)

http://spriteme.org/ (very handy and will do the work for you - recommended)

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