Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a script that gets called with this line:

./myscript -vfd ./foo/bar/someFile -o /fizz/someOtherFile

or this one:

./myscript -v -f -d -o /fizz/someOtherFile ./foo/bar/someFile 

What's the accepted way of parsing this such that in each case (or some combination of the two) $v, $f, and $d will all be set to true and $outFile will be equal to /fizz/someOtherFile?

share|improve this question
1  
1) file.sh having: echo $1 $2 $3 $4 2) ./file.sh input1 input2 input3 input4 3) output: input1 input2 input3 input4 –  YumYumYum Jun 6 '12 at 12:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 335 down vote accepted

Preferred Method: Using straight bash without getopt[s]

I originally answered the question as the OP asked. This Q/A is getting a lot of attention, so I should also offer the non-magic way to do this. I'm going to expand upon guneysus's answer to fix the nasty sed and include Tobias Kienzler's suggestion.

Two of the most common ways to pass key value pair arguments are:

Straight Bash Space Separated

Usage ./myscript.sh -e conf -s /etc -l /usr/lib /etc/hosts

#!/bin/bash
while [[ $# > 1 ]]
do
key="$1"

case $key in
    -e|--extension)
    EXTENSION="$2"
    shift
    ;;
    -s|--searchpath)
    SEARCHPATH="$2"
    shift
    ;;
    -l|--lib)
    LIBPATH="$2"
    shift
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift
    ;;
    *)
            # unknown option
    ;;
esac
shift
done
echo FILE EXTENSION  = "${EXTENSION}"
echo SEARCH PATH     = "${SEARCHPATH}"
echo LIBRARY PATH    = "${LIBPATH}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 $1
fi

Straight Bash Equals Separated

#!/bin/bash

for i in "$@"
do
case $i in
    -e=*|--extension=*)
    EXTENSION="${i#*=}"
    shift
    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    LIBPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift
    ;;
    *)
            # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo "FILE EXTENSION  = ${EXTENSION}"
echo "SEARCH PATH     = ${SEARCHPATH}"
echo "LIBRARY PATH    = ${LIBPATH}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 $1
fi

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

Using getopt[s]

from: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035#getopts

Never use getopt(1). getopt cannot handle empty arguments strings, or arguments with embedded whitespace. Please forget that it ever existed.

The POSIX shell (and others) offer getopts which is safe to use instead. Here is a simplistic getopts example:

#!/bin/sh

# A POSIX variable
OPTIND=1         # Reset in case getopts has been used previously in the shell.

# Initialize our own variables:
output_file=""
verbose=0

while getopts "h?vf:" opt; do
    case "$opt" in
    h|\?)
        show_help
        exit 0
        ;;
    v)  verbose=1
        ;;
    f)  output_file=$OPTARG
        ;;
    esac
done

shift $((OPTIND-1))

[ "$1" = "--" ] && shift

echo "verbose=$verbose, output_file='$output_file', Leftovers: $@"

# End of file

The advantages of getopts are:

  1. It's portable, and will work in e.g. dash.
  2. It can handle things like -vf filename in the expected Unix way, automatically.

The disadvantage of getopts is that it can only handle short options (-h, not --help) without trickery.

There is a getopts tutorial which explains what all of the syntax and variables mean. In bash, there is also help getopts, which might be informative.

share|improve this answer
7  
Is this really true? According to Wikipedia there's a newer GNU enhanced version of getopt which includes all the functionality of getopts and then some. man getopt on Ubuntu 13.04 outputs getopt - parse command options (enhanced) as the name, so I presume this enhanced version is standard now. –  Livven Jun 6 '13 at 21:19
6  
That something is a certain way on your system is a very weak premise to base asumptions of "being standard" on. –  szablica Jul 17 '13 at 15:23
1  
@szablica while it's not "standard", the man page for it was written in 1997 and I can find it in RHEL 3, a 10 year old distribution (unsupported for 6 years now). You can just run getopt -T and bail out if the command return code is not 4 to check if you're not running on some truly ancient OS or without GNU userland. –  Hubert Kario Nov 18 '13 at 16:29
3  
FYI: The space separated script will miss the last option off. while [[ $# > 1 ]] should be while [[ $# > 0 ]] –  Aydin Hassan Jan 6 '14 at 16:25
1  
@Livven, that getopt is not a GNU utility, it's part of util-linux. –  Stephane Chazelas Aug 20 '14 at 19:55

getopt()/getopts() is a good option. Stolen from here:

The simple use of "getopt" is shown in this mini-script:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Before getopt"
for i
do
  echo $i
done
args=`getopt abc:d $*`
set -- $args
echo "After getopt"
for i
do
  echo "-->$i"
done

What we have said is that any of -a, -b, -c or -d will be allowed, but that -c is followed by an argument (the "c:" says that).

If we call this "g" and try it out:

bash-2.05a$ ./g -abc foo
Before getopt
-abc
foo
After getopt
-->-a
-->-b
-->-c
-->foo
-->--

We start with two arguments, and "getopt" breaks apart the options and puts each in its own argument. It also added "--".

share|improve this answer
37  
Please don't tell people to use getopt. mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035#getopts The should be using the newer getopts. –  Bruno Bronosky Jan 7 '13 at 19:55

from : digitalpeer.com with minor modifications

Usage myscript.sh -p=my_prefix -s=dirname -l=libname

#!/bin/bash
for i in "$@"
do
case $i in
    -p=*|--prefix=*)
    PREFIX="${i#*=}"

    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    DIR="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    ;;
    *)
            # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo PREFIX = ${PREFIX}
echo SEARCH PATH = ${SEARCHPATH}
echo DIRS = ${DIR}

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

share|improve this answer
2  
Look at the "Special Parameters" section of 'man bash'. You probably want 'for i in "$@"; do', not 'for i in $*; do' –  bobpaul Dec 13 '12 at 18:10
2  
Thank you for this. Whoever wrote getopts and getopt should be shot and then fired. –  Andy Ray Apr 19 '13 at 19:25
2  
@RichardBronosky Thanks! I'm afraid your neat suggestion got rejected since it was too severe an edit, but you could certainly post a new answer (linking to this one as its origin) –  Tobias Kienzler Nov 23 '13 at 9:03
1  
@TobiasKienzler I added the non-getopts way to my answer to make it more complete. Originally I thought it better to keep it here. Oh well. –  Bruno Bronosky Nov 25 '13 at 20:35
2  
@RichardBronosky I re-added your sed-replacement, since that is really a necessary improvement here (no offense meant, guneysus, but it's better to use bash's own tools when possible) –  Tobias Kienzler Nov 26 '13 at 7:36

I'm about 4 years late to this question, but want to give back. I used the earlier answers as a starting point to tidy up my old adhoc param parsing. I then refactored out the following template code. It handles both long and short params, using = or space separated arguments, as well as multiple short params grouped together. Finally it re-inserts any non-param arguments back into the $1,$2.. variables. I hope it's useful.

#!/usr/bin/env bash

# NOTICE: Uncomment if your script depends on bashisms.
#if [ -z "$BASH_VERSION" ]; then bash $0 $@ ; exit $? ; fi

echo "Before"
for i ; do echo - $i ; done


# Code template for parsing command line parameters using only portable shell
# code, while handling both long and short params, handling '-f file' and
# '-f=file' style param data and also capturing non-parameters to be inserted
# back into the shell positional parameters.

while [ -n "$1" ]; do
        # Copy so we can modify it (can't modify $1)
        OPT="$1"
        # Detect argument termination
        if [ x"$OPT" = x"--" ]; then
                shift
                for OPT ; do
                        REMAINS="$REMAINS \"$OPT\""
                done
                break
        fi
        # Parse current opt
        while [ x"$OPT" != x"-" ] ; do
                case "$OPT" in
                        # Handle --flag=value opts like this
                        -c=* | --config=* )
                                CONFIGFILE="${OPT#*=}"
                                shift
                                ;;
                        # and --flag value opts like this
                        -c* | --config )
                                CONFIGFILE="$2"
                                shift
                                ;;
                        -f* | --force )
                                FORCE=true
                                ;;
                        -r* | --retry )
                                RETRY=true
                                ;;
                        # Anything unknown is recorded for later
                        * )
                                REMAINS="$REMAINS \"$OPT\""
                                break
                                ;;
                esac
                # Check for multiple short options
                # NOTICE: be sure to update this pattern to match valid options
                NEXTOPT="${OPT#-[cfr]}" # try removing single short opt
                if [ x"$OPT" != x"$NEXTOPT" ] ; then
                        OPT="-$NEXTOPT"  # multiple short opts, keep going
                else
                        break  # long form, exit inner loop
                fi
        done
        # Done with that param. move to next
        shift
done
# Set the non-parameters back into the positional parameters ($1 $2 ..)
eval set -- $REMAINS


echo -e "After: \n configfile='$CONFIGFILE' \n force='$FORCE' \n retry='$RETRY' \n remains='$REMAINS'"
for i ; do echo - $i ; done
share|improve this answer

I think this one is simple enough to use:

#!/bin/bash
#

readopt='getopts $opts opt;rc=$?;[ $rc$opt == 0? ]&&exit 1;[ $rc == 0 ]||{ shift $[OPTIND-1];false; }'

opts=vfdo:

# Enumerating options
while eval $readopt
do
    echo OPT:$opt ${OPTARG+OPTARG:$OPTARG}
done

# Enumerating arguments
for arg
do
    echo ARG:$arg
done

Invocation example:

./myscript -v -do /fizz/someOtherFile -f ./foo/bar/someFile
OPT:v 
OPT:d 
OPT:o OPTARG:/fizz/someOtherFile
OPT:f 
ARG:./foo/bar/someFile
share|improve this answer

Expanding on the excellent answer by @guneysus, here is a tweak that lets user use whichever syntax they prefer, eg

command -x=myfilename.ext --another_switch 

vs

command -x myfilename.ext --another_switch

That is to say the equals can be replaced with whitespace.

This "fuzzy interpretation" might not be to your liking, but if you are making scripts that are interchangeable with other utilities (as is the case with mine, which must work with ffmpeg), the flexibility is useful.

STD_IN=0

prefix=""
key=""
value=""
for keyValue in "$@"
do
  case "${prefix}${keyValue}" in
    -i=*|--input_filename=*)  key="-i";     value="${keyValue#*=}";; 
    -ss=*|--seek_from=*)      key="-ss";    value="${keyValue#*=}";;
    -t=*|--play_seconds=*)    key="-t";     value="${keyValue#*=}";;
    -|--stdin)                key="-";      value=1;;
    *)                                      value=$keyValue;;
  esac
  case $key in
    -i) MOVIE=$(resolveMovie "${value}");  prefix=""; key="";;
    -ss) SEEK_FROM="${value}";          prefix=""; key="";;
    -t)  PLAY_SECONDS="${value}";           prefix=""; key="";;
    -)   STD_IN=${value};                   prefix=""; key="";; 
    *)   prefix="${keyValue}=";;
  esac
done
share|improve this answer

This is how I do in a function to avoid breaking getopts run at the same time somewhere higher in stack:

function waitForWeb () {
   local OPTIND=1 OPTARG OPTION
   local host=localhost port=8080 proto=http
   while getopts "h:p:r:" OPTION; do
      case "$OPTION" in
      h)
         host="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      p)
         port="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      r)
         proto="$OPTARG"
         ;;
      esac
   done
...
}
share|improve this answer

Use module "arguments" from bash-modules

Example:

#!/bin/bash
. import.sh log arguments

NAME="world"

parse_arguments "-n|--name)NAME;S" -- "$@" || {
  error "Cannot parse command line."
  exit 1
}

info "Hello, $NAME!"
share|improve this answer

This also might be useful to know, you can set a value and if someone provides input, override the default with that value..

myscript.sh -f ./serverlist.txt or just ./myscript.sh (and it takes defaults)

    #!/bin/bash
    # --- set the value, if there is inputs, override the defaults.

    HOME_FOLDER="${HOME}/owned_id_checker"
    SERVER_FILE_LIST="${HOME_FOLDER}/server_list.txt"

    while [[ $# > 1 ]]
    do
    key="$1"
    shift

    case $key in
        -i|--inputlist)
        SERVER_FILE_LIST="$1"
        shift
        ;;
    esac
    done


    echo "SERVER LIST   = ${SERVER_FILE_LIST}"
share|improve this answer

getopts works great if #1 you have it installed and #2 you intend to run it on the same platform. OSX and Linux (for example) behave differently in this respect.

Here is a (non getopts) solution that supports equals, non-equals, and boolean flags. For example you could run your script in this way:

./script --arg1=value1 --arg2 value2 --shouldClean

# parse the arguments.
COUNTER=0
ARGS=("$@")
while [ $COUNTER -lt $# ]
do
    arg=${ARGS[$COUNTER]}
    let COUNTER=COUNTER+1
    nextArg=${ARGS[$COUNTER]}

    if [[ $skipNext -eq 1 ]]; then
        echo "Skipping"
        skipNext=0
        continue
    fi

    argKey=""
    argVal=""
    if [[ "$arg" =~ ^\- ]]; then
        # if the format is: -key=value
        if [[ "$argKey" =~ \= ]]; then
            argVal=$(echo "$argKey" | cut -d'=' -f2)
            argKey=$(echo "$argKey" | cut -d'=' -f1)
            skipNext=0

        # if the format is: -key value
        elif [[ ! "$nextArg" =~ ^\- ]]; then
            argKey="$arg"
            argVal="$nextArg"
            skipNext=1

        # if the format is: -key (a boolean flag)
        elif [[ "$nextArg" =~ ^\- ]] || [[ -z "$nextArg" ]]; then
            argKey="$arg"
            argVal=""
            skipNext=0
        fi
    # if the format has not flag, just a value.
    else
        argKey=""
        argVal="$arg"
        skipNext=0
    fi

    case "$argKey" in 
        --source-scmurl)
            SOURCE_URL="$argVal"
        ;;
        --dest-scmurl)
            DEST_URL="$argVal"
        ;;
        --version-num)
            VERSION_NUM="$argVal"
        ;;
        -c|--clean)
            CLEAN_BEFORE_START="1"
        ;;
        -h|--help|-help|--h)
            showUsage
            exit
        ;;
    esac
done
share|improve this answer

There is a lot of confusion about how to handle this best:

  • Use enhanced getopt from util-linux or formerly GNU glibc.
  • It works with getopt() the C function of GNU glibc.
  • Has all useful distinguishing features (others don’t have them):
    • it can handle options at the end script.sh -o outFile file1 file2 -v
    • =-style long options script.sh --outfile=fileOut --infile fileIn
  • Is so old already that no GNU system is missing this (e.g. any Linux has it).
  • You can test for its existence with getopt --test → return value 4.
  • Other getopt or shell-builtin getopts are of limited use.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.