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Currently I'm using a generic interface to declare IoC dependencies like this:

public interface IComposition<T>
{
  T Dependency { get; set; }
}

But happens that my implementations could have more than one dependency at same time.

I know it's ridiculous, but just to you guys understand what I need... let's say I implement the interface multiple times to solve my problem:

public class MyClass : IComposition<TypeA>, IComposition<TypeB>
{
  ...
}

I believe that using IComposition<T1, T2, ...> or one ITypeXDependent for each type aren't good options. My core needs to resolve dependencies at runtime using reflection. So, thats why I'm not passing dependencies through the constructor.

Does anyone know some trick that can help me out?

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7  
Why can't you simply implement the interface multiple times, as you've illustrated? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 7 '13 at 14:11
2  
The reason for such an interface seems to evade me completely. Why do you want to have something like this? –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 7 '13 at 14:12
3  
Also, have you considered injecting your dependencies through the constructor, instead of interface inheritance? Would be much easier to handle and use during tests anyway. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 7 '13 at 14:12
    
@LasseV.Karlsen I had not even imagined that was possible by explicit implementations. Thanks! –  cvsguimaraes Oct 7 '13 at 14:25
    
@DanielHilgarth My core needs to resolve dependencies at runtime using reflection. So, that was what come in mind... –  cvsguimaraes Oct 7 '13 at 14:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Aside regular interfaces, generic interfaces can be "implemented N times" since each generic type parameter used create another interface type. The only thing to care about is to implement the interface explicitly:

public interface IComposition<T>
{
    T Dependency { get; set; }
}

public class MyClass: IComposition<TypeA>, IComposition<TypeB>
{
    IComposition<TypeA>.TypeA Dependency { get; set; }
    IComposition<TypeB>.TypeB Dependency { get; set; }
}
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I would use constructor parameters instead of your current scheme to set up dependencies:

public class MyClass
{
    public void MyClass(TypeA a, TypeB b)
    {
        ....
    }
}
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