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I recently posted on question for extracting anchor text from anchor tag using javascript. I got one answer for it.

However the code is working in IE and Chrome but not in Firefox.

function extractText(){
    var docId = "10";
    var cId = "13";
    var dName = "ASPIRIN/COUMARIN";
    var anchText = "<a target=\"_blank\" href=hello?docId=" + docId + "&cId=" + cId +">" + dName +"</a>";
    var str1 = document.createElement('str1');      

    str1.innerHTML = anchText;
    var anc = str1.innerText;

    alert(anc);

    return anc;
}

I suppose the property of innerText or innerHTML or both is not working in firefox. Can you please help where the above code work for IE, Chrome, Firefox etc.

share|improve this question
    
i tried textContext and something caled textcontent.. is ther spelling error? or what else can be used? –  user2437771 Oct 7 '13 at 14:14
1  
Java != JavaScript. –  j08691 Oct 7 '13 at 14:14
    
using jQuery will help you get rid of these cross browser issues. Any particular reason you want to stick with Javascript? –  Vandesh Oct 7 '13 at 14:16
    
yes. it is an enhancement in existing codein our project. i hv restriction to use only javascript. –  user2437771 Oct 7 '13 at 14:18

2 Answers 2

textContent by the W3C standard used in Firefox is the alternative for innerText

share|improve this answer

Firefox doesn't seem to support the innerText property, preferring to use the W3C's standard of textContent:

function extractText() {
    var docId = "10";
    var cId = "13";
    var dName = "ASPIRIN/COUMARIN";
    var anchText = "<a target=\"_blank\" href=hello?docId=" + docId + "&cId=" + cId + ">" + dName + "</a>";
    var str1 = document.createElement('str1');

    str1.innerHTML = anchText;
    var anc = (str1.innerText || str1.textContent);

    console.log(anc);

    return anc;
}

extractText();

JS Fiddle demo.

Assuming you want to avoid checking both properties on every call, you could simply check which the browser supports, with:

var textProperty = 'textContent' in document ? 'textContent' : 'innerText';

And then use that as follows:

var anc = str1[textProperty];

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

share|improve this answer
    
var textProperty = 'textContent' in document ? 'textContent' : 'innerText'; var anc = str1[textProperty]; is working fine for me. Thanks you very much –  user2437771 Oct 7 '13 at 15:13
    
You're very welcome indeed! Do consider, if your problem is solved, marking this answer as 'accepted' (by ticking the checkmark besides the answer text). Please see: 'How does accepting an answer work?' –  David Thomas Oct 7 '13 at 15:28

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