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I am wondering how we should read from a complicated csv file that consists of strings, doubles and chars, etc.

For example, could you please provide a successful command that can extract a numerical value in this csv file?

Click here.

For example:

yield curve data 2013-10-04     
Yields in percentages per annum.        


Parameters - AAA-rated bonds        
Series key   Parameters  Description
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.BETA0  2.03555 Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Beta 0 - Euro, provided by ECB
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.BETA1  -2.009068   Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Beta 1 - Euro, provided by ECB
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.BETA2  24.54184    Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Beta 2 - Euro, provided by ECB
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.BETA3  -21.80556   Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Beta 3 - Euro, provided by ECB
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.TAU1   5.351378    Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Tau 1 - Euro, provided by ECB
YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.TAU2   4.321162    Euro area (changing composition) - Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Tau 2 - Euro, provided by ECB

Those are part of the info, in the file. And I tried csvread('yc_latest.csv', 6, 1, [6,1,6,1]) to get the value 2.03555, but it gave me the following error:

   Error using dlmread (line 139)
    Mismatch between file and format string.
    Trouble reading number from file (row 1u, field 3u) ==> "Euro area (changing composition) -
    Government bond, nominal, all issuers whose rating is triple A - Svensson model - continuous
    compounding - yield error minimisation - Yield curve parameters, Beta 0

    Error in csvread (line 50)
        m=dlmread(filename, ',', r, c, rng);
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2  
Your thanks are premature. Show us your code, your best attempt, and we might help. Links to zip files on dodgy sites don't encourage many SOers to follow them. – High Performance Mark Oct 7 '13 at 14:24
    
Can you give us an example of how you would like a row to be parsed? (which data you actually want) – John Riselvato Oct 7 '13 at 14:26
1  
Sorry, I've just edited – Cancan Oct 7 '13 at 14:32
2  
You can try uiimport. Alternatively, you can just simplify the content of your file by editing it in Excel for example, and remove unnecessary data. – marsei Oct 7 '13 at 14:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I strongly suggest you use the "import data" functionality from matlab (it's in the "HOME" toolbar).

Especially notice in the screenshot that it can also generate the code for you so you can automate it in the future. enter image description here

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1  
For mixed data (numbers and text) I would typically recommend the cell array option. – Dennis Jaheruddin Oct 8 '13 at 8:32
    
True, actually I took the screenshot from the settings MATLAB automatically discovered. Suppose there's a lot to tweak. – bdecaf Oct 8 '13 at 8:35

Here's a pretty hacky solution. Unfortunately Matlab pretty much blows at reading csv files, making this kind of hackery an unfortunate necessity. On the bright side, you probably only have to write this kind of code once.

fid = fopen('yc_latest.csv');   %// open the file

%// parse as csv, skipping the first six lines
contents = textscan(fid, '%s %f %[^\n]', 'HeaderLines', 6); 

%// unpack the fields and give them meaningful names
[seriesKey, parameters, description]   = contents{:};

fclose(fid);                    %// don't forget this!
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Note that you can use textscan(..., 'HeaderLines', 6) instead of the loop. P.S: I think MATLAB is great at parsing CSV files! – Eitan T Oct 8 '13 at 6:06
    
@EitanT Compare it to R, where the code would be x <- read.csv("yc_latest.csv", skip=5, header=TRUE, stringsAsFactors=FALSE). That's also robust to the order of the column names changing, or columns being added/subtracted (this happens a lot where I work!) whereas the Matlab solution involves extracting the headers separately and matching on them. It frustrates me that there isn't an all-in-one csv reading function built in to Matlab. Good point about 'HeaderLines' though, I'll edit to include that. – Chris Taylor Oct 8 '13 at 7:12
    
Well, there is csvread, but since this file is not really comma-separated, you can't really complain about MATLAB here. It's like saying that the C language blows at reading files, which would be absolute nonsense. Perhaps this functionality is not built into the language, but you can whip up something equivalent just as easily. By the way, I think you can do another improvement in your code by using %f in the format string for the parameters column, it should save you the trouble of doing str2double later. – Eitan T Oct 8 '13 at 7:27
    
@EitanT I tried setting the format string to "%s %f %q" to match the format of the file, but then not all of the lines are read (I suppose some of them are badly formatted). Another way in which Matlab is annoying - it gives up if it encounters something unexpected, rather than giving you the option to interpret un-parseable floats as NaN or something else. I think your point about C is misplaced - C is a general purpose systems programming language. Matlab is supposed to be a specialist language for math and data analysis - reading CSV files is something it should be really good at! – Chris Taylor Oct 8 '13 at 7:35
1  
@EitanT Well, there's no formal specification for CSV files, but I think it's reasonable that people might want to include comment lines, headers, missing values and mixed numeric/text data - especially when dealing with real-world data. In any case, thanks for improving the answer! – Chris Taylor Oct 8 '13 at 7:52

An alternative to the solution from Chris:

fid=fopen('yc_latest.csv');
Rows = textscan(fid,'%s', 'delimiter','\n'); %Creates a temporary cell array with the rows
fclose(fid);

%looks for the lines with a euro value:
value=strfind(Rows,'Euro'); 
Idx = find(~cellfun('isempty', value)); 

Columns= cellfun(@(x) textscan(x,'%f','delimiter','\t','CollectOutput',1), Rows);
Columns= cellfun(@transpose, Columns, 'UniformOutput', 0);

The index of all lines with an actual euro value are stored in Idx.

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You may want to use textscan this way.

Each line is parsed with regular delimiters (tabs, spaces), and the format used is %*s with a star to skip the first element (YC.B.U2.EUR.4F.G_N_A.SV_C_YM.BETA0), then %f to get the value of interest, and finally %*[^\n] to skip the remaining of the line.

fid = fopen(filename);                                
C = textscan(fid, '%*s%f%*[^\n]', 'HeaderLines', 6); 
fclose(fid);

values   = C{1};
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