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I'm working on a script that takes a few minutes to run, and would like to provide some output to the user about its progress. Unfortunately i'm exceedingly lazy. what I'd like to do is write a function without the logging, and then apply a decorator to it which steps through the function and prints each line before executing that line. Basically what I'm looking for is a loggingdecorator such that:

>>> @loggingdecorator
... def myfunction():
...     foo()
...     bar()
...     baz()
>>> myfunction()
Starting myfunction
foo() ... [OK]
bar() ... [OK]
baz() ... [OK]
myfunction Done!

Here's what I've tried so far:

import sys


def logging_tracer(frame, event, arg):
    def local_tracer(local_frame, event, arg):
        if frame is local_frame:
            print frame.f_code.co_name, event, arg

    print frame.f_code.co_name, event, arg
    return local_tracer


def loggingdecorator(func):
    def _wrapper():
        old_trace_function = sys.gettrace()
        sys.settrace(logging_tracer)
        try:
            result = func()
        except:
            raise
        else:
            return result
        finally:
            sys.settrace(old_trace_function)
    return _wrapper

Unfortunately, this prints a bit too much; it follows function calls and prints them out, line by line as well (well, this doesn't actually print the source line, existing answers using inspect, combined with stuff on the frame object in the trace function would do it), but I'm a bit stumped as to how the logging_tracer unless the function in question is actually decorated.

share|improve this question
    
You can place the same decorator on all the functions that you are wanting to call. Then put your print statement inside the functions. As the functions are executed the print statements are run as well. Or you can simply place the print statement within each function without worrying about decorator and it should still do the same – khredos Oct 7 '13 at 14:52
    
@Smac89 your suggestion is too invasive. Debug print is a very bad tracing technique – J0HN Oct 7 '13 at 14:54
    
Closest thing I would think of, would be line_profiler. You could probably use a similar method to do what you want. Unfortunately, line_profiler is written in c/cython, so not that easy to modify. – Corley Brigman Oct 7 '13 at 15:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

So here's what I came up with. @Corley Brigman's comment got me started in the right direction. This is a bit hackey, sys.gettrace/settrace are rather promenently documented as "CPython implementation details", and so this solution should not be expected to work in other implementations. That said, it seems to work out pretty well. The tracing functionality in cpython does not provide any notification of "line finished executing", so the [ok] from my question doesn't really make any sense.

Fixing the recursive tracing issue is just a simple matter of keeping a cache of the functions that were decorated, and then only produce output if the frame being traced is from a function that was decorated.

import inspect
import sys


def logging_tracer(frame, event, arg):
    lines, firstline = inspect.getsourcelines(frame)

    def local_tracer(local_frame, event, arg):
        if event == 'line' and frame is local_frame:
            print event, frame.f_lineno,'\t', lines[frame.f_lineno - firstline]
            #print event, lines[frame.f_lineno - firstline]
            #print frame.f_code.co_name, frame.f_lineno, event, arg

    if frame.f_code in LOG_THESE_FUNCTIONS:
        print event, frame.f_lineno,'\t', lines[frame.f_lineno - firstline + (event == 'call')]
        #print frame.f_code.co_name, event, arg
        return local_tracer
    else:
        return None


LOG_THESE_FUNCTIONS = set()


def loggingdecorator(func):
    LOG_THESE_FUNCTIONS.add(func.func_code)

    def _wrapper():
        old_trace_function = sys.gettrace()
        sys.settrace(logging_tracer)
        try:
            result = func()
        except:
            raise
        else:
            return result
        finally:
            sys.settrace(old_trace_function)
    return _wrapper
share|improve this answer

Here's an ugly example that works if there's only one indentation level:

import inspect


def myDec(func):
    temp = list(inspect.getsourcelines(func)[0])

    temp.append('    print("{} Done!")\n'.format(func.__name__))
    for index in range(len(temp)-2, 0, -1):
        temp.insert(index+1, "    print('''{}...[OK]''')\n".format(temp[index].strip().rstrip("\n")))
    temp.insert(1, '    print("Starting {}")\n'.format(func.__name__))
    temp = "".join(temp)
    exec(temp)
    return locals()[func.__name__]

def foo():
    a = 4+5
    list_int = range(100)


foo = myDec(foo)
foo()

Really ugly though...

share|improve this answer

You can do something like this:

>>> class loggingdecorator:
...     def __init__(self, func):
...             self.func = func
...     def __call__(self):
...             print "Entering", self.func.__name__
...             self.func()
...             print "Exited", self.func.__name__
...

Then with each of your functions:

>>> @loggingdecorator
... def func1():
...     print "Hello from func1(), how are you doing?"
... 
>>> @loggingdecorator
... def func2():
...     print "Hello from func2(), Whaddup Dawg...?"
... 
>>> func1()
Entering func1
Hello from func1(), how are you doing?
Exited func1
>>> func2()
Entering func2
Hello from func2(), Whaddup Dawg...?
Exited func2

Found the example from this page

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, not quite what I'm looking for. Imagine the function being decorated is ten lines long, and each line takes 1 minute to run. I want to see the actual source line printed to the console right before it's executed, ten lines out output, each separated by about a minute of elapsed time. – SingleNegationElimination Oct 7 '13 at 16:56

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