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If I write this:

public sealed class Foo
{
    private int count;
    private object owner;
    private void Bar()
    {
        Contract.Requires(count > 0);
        Contract.Ensures(owner == null || count > 0);

        if (count == 1)
            owner = null;
        --count;
    }
}

The static contract checker can prove all assertions.

But if I write this instead:

public sealed class Foo
{
    private int count;
    private object owner;
    private void Bar()
    {
        Contract.Requires(count > 0);
        Contract.Ensures(owner == null || count > 0);

        --count;
        if (count == 0)
            owner = null;
    }
}

It claims the postcondition owner == null || count > 0 is unproven.

I think I can prove the second form does not violate this postcondition:

// { count > 0 } it's required
--count;
// { count == 0 || count > 0 } if it was 1, it's now zero, otherwise it's still greater than zero
if (count == 0)
{
    // { count == 0 } the if condition is true
    owner = null;
    // { count == 0 && owner == null } assignment works
}
// { count == 0 && owner == null || count != 0 && count > 0 } either the if was entered or not
// { owner == null || count > 0 } we can assume a weaker postcondition

Is something wrong with my proof?

I added the assertions in my proof as Contract.Assert calls to the code, and I came to the conclusion that if I add just this one, it manages to prove the postcondition:

--count;
Contract.Assert(count == 0 || count > 0)
if (count == 0)
    owner = null;

But, if I now change that same assertion to a "more natural" way, it fails:

--count;
Contract.Assert(count >= 0)
if (count == 0)
    owner = null;

It would be expected that those two assertions were equivalent, but the static checker treats them differently.

(I'm using beta 2 of VS10 by the way)

share|improve this question
    
Since no one proved me wrong so far, I'll take it as a bug and file a report. Now, where can I do that? Google to the rescue... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 16:40
    
Connect seems to hate me, or my connection, or Chrome. I would appreciate it if someone would report this bug for me... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wouldn't expect this highly complex prover thing to be in a fully working state yet since it's just a beta after all. I think it is a bug or at least a point worth raising with the developers, because this is a very simple thing to static check automatically.

Anyway, by the looks of things, the ensures marker is just there to say whether the static contract checker is able to ensure the condition or not. This does not imply that the condition is not valid, it just means it can't find a proof.

I would be much more worried about cases where it says something is ensured which is invalid. That would count as a bug!

share|improve this answer
    
What about the fact it treats a >= b and a == b || a > b? Is there a reason? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 17:35
    
I means, treats those differently. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 17:35

Caveat: I know absolutely nothing about the specifics of the .net contract system.

However, I can tell you this: it's literally not possible (cf. halting problem) to produce a complete prover for assertions as rich as the one that it appears this system supports.

So: is this a bug? No.

On the other hand, it seems plausible to suggest that this might be a common case that the implementors of the prover might want to add to their system.

share|improve this answer
    
I know about the halting problem. But this particular problem can be proven (I did so). Isn't the fact that a prover treats a >= b different from a == b || a > b differently a bug? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 17:30
    
Nope. More specifically: there's guaranteed to be a gap between the things that can be proven in some particular system and the things that are true. So the important question is whether your proof fits into the proof system associated with .NET contracts. It may be that it does, but in general it won't be a bug to find that it doesn't, unless the .NET checker makes specific promises to you about what kind of proofs it is guaranteed to find. –  John Clements Dec 17 '09 at 18:41
    
Ok, I get your point in a general sense. Yet, I think the equivalence between a >= b and a == b || a > b is expected (and reasonable) behavior in such a system (with both a and b pure, which the .NET checker requires). Failure to comply with expected behavior is a bug in my book. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 18:47

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