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I am using the following lines in a script.

foo=$1

bar=$(printf  ' , "%s" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti' ${foo[@]} ${foo[@]} ${foo[@]} ${foo[@]}   )

bar=${bar:2}

echo $bar    

This produces the following line as the value of variable bar

"rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti

Is it possible to modify the script so the output is:

"rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($2) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($3) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($4) lw 8 ti , "rdf_inter_fortran_05-25.xvg" u ($1):($5) lw 8 ti
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Uh.......... yes? –  Marc B Oct 7 '13 at 14:52
    
I modified the question!!! –  Samanosuke Akechi Oct 7 '13 at 14:58
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change your printf line to the following :

bar=$(printf ' , "%s" u ($1):($%s) lw 8 ti' ${foo[@]} "2" ${foo[@]} "3" ${foo[@]} "4" ${foo[@]} "5" )
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It looks like you are replacing some $2's with new strings. Insert this line before echo $bar :

bar=$(echo $bar | sed 's/$2/$5/4; s/$2/$4/3; s/$2/$3/2;')

This replaces the 4th, 3rd and 2nd occurrence of $2 with new respective values $5, $4 and $3.

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