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I have an application using PKRevealController which implements a slide-out menu similar to the ones in the popular Facebook and GMAIL apps on iOS. The app is built in XCode 5, and runs on iOS 6 and iOS 7. I need to figure out how to have it work sanely in both places, so a simple .XIB hack that makes it look okay in iOS 7 but makes it look worse in iOS 6 is not okay.

The code works great for iOS 6, where the status bar is opaque and the top view is not alpha-blended with the status bar.

However, on iOS 7, just for example, I have created this view in my .xib file, here is how it appears running in ioS 6 simulator, shown here with the slide out menu opened:

enter image description here

The same .xib file running on ios 7, when the slide-out menu open, the top of the slide out menu's .xib content is now under the status bar, as Apple said it would be in their ios 7 transition guide:

enter image description here

The class I need to modify in PKRevealController is probably the presenting view controller that is creating and presenting the contained view, the contained view is called PKRevealControllerContainerView, I think. I think I probably need to create some kind of view hierarchy like this:

   [  Outermost View container 
        [ some kind of blob to occupy the header area ]
        [ the client view I want to appear the way it did in iOS 6]
   ]

I've been reading around, and there may be much simpler approaches, but I don't quite understand them, approaches like adding properties to my info.plist, like View controller-based status bar appearance = YES. I tried that it did not have the desired effect.

How do I go about fixing this? I have read the Fine Guide published by Apple and it has not provided code, only general guidance like this page on the status bar.

It's easy to replicate this problem, just clone the git repo https://github.com/pkluz/PKRevealController, build and run.

The code that brings up the pop-up view looks like this:

- (void)addLeftViewControllerToHierarchy
{
    if (self.leftViewController != nil && ![self.childViewControllers containsObject:self.leftViewController])
    {
        [self addChildViewController:self.leftViewController];
        self.leftViewContainer.viewController = self.leftViewController;

        if (self.leftViewContainer == nil)
        {
            self.leftViewContainer = [[PKRevealControllerContainerView alloc] initForController:self.leftViewController shadow:NO];
            self.leftViewContainer.autoresizingMask = [self autoresizingMaskForLeftViewContainer];
        }

        self.leftViewContainer.frame = [self leftViewFrame];
        [self.view insertSubview:self.leftViewContainer belowSubview:self.frontViewContainer];
        [self.leftViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
    }
}

The above is invoked by PKRevealController.m, like this:

- (void)showLeftViewControllerAnimated:(BOOL)animated
                            completion:(PKDefaultCompletionHandler)completion
{
    __weak PKRevealController *weakSelf = self;

    void (^showLeftViewBlock)(BOOL finished) = ^(BOOL finished)
    {
        [weakSelf removeRightViewControllerFromHierarchy];
        [weakSelf addLeftViewControllerToHierarchy];  // HELLO LEFT Slide-out menu.

        ....

Is there a better approach than my idea? Did Apple provide some way to make this easy or does trying to support iOS 6 and iOS 7 in a single codebase leave me doing hacks like the above I'm considering?

Here, for instance, is a really ugly hack where I don't bother placing any view underneath the apple system status bar, leaving a black bar at the top, which is no good, but it shows I'm modifying the right area in the code, at least:

- (void)addLeftViewControllerToHierarchy
{
    CGRect   lvFrame;

    if (self.leftViewController != nil && ![self.childViewControllers containsObject:self.leftViewController])
    {
        [self addChildViewController:self.leftViewController];
        self.leftViewContainer.viewController = self.leftViewController;

        if (self.leftViewContainer == nil)
        {
            self.leftViewContainer = [[PKRevealControllerContainerView alloc] initForController:self.leftViewController shadow:NO];
            self.leftViewContainer.autoresizingMask = [self autoresizingMaskForLeftViewContainer];
        }

        lvFrame = [self leftViewFrame];
        lvFrame.origin.y += 20; // ugly hack demo code only! don't really do it this badly!
        lvFrame.size.height -= 20;
        self.leftViewContainer.frame = lvFrame;
        [self.view insertSubview:self.leftViewContainer belowSubview:self.frontViewContainer];
        [self.leftViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
    }
}

The above hack is almost enough, if I also add this to UIViewController+PKRevealController.m:

-(UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle{
    return UIStatusBarStyleBlackOpaque;
}

The above code, when added, causes the following hint/warning:

Category is implementing a method that will also be implemented by its primary class.

I'm including the above notes to show what I've tried, and I welcome some idea of how the real experts are doing this.

My own modified copy of the PKRevealController code, including the hack above, in a slightly improved form, is found here: https://github.com/wpostma/PKRevealController

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've been struggling with PKRevealController as well. While I'm still looking for better solutions I will share what I came up with until now.

My two problems were:

  1. Status bar style was always the same and I wanted a different style for the front view and the menu;
  2. The menu view top cell (it's a table view controller) showed up behind the status bar.

1. Dynamic status bar style

First I had my own PKRevealController subclass where I was having a custom initialiser and some custom methods to load new view controllers into the front view navigation view controller. But that's not relevant for now.

I used this subclass to implement preferredStatusBarStyle as follows so that the reveal controller can provide the right style for each state:

- (UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle {
    switch (self.state) {
        case PKRevealControllerFocusesLeftViewController:
            return [self.leftViewController preferredStatusBarStyle];
            break;
        case PKRevealControllerFocusesRightViewController:
            return [self.rightViewController preferredStatusBarStyle];
            break;
        case PKRevealControllerFocusesFrontViewController:
            return [self.frontViewController preferredStatusBarStyle];
            break;
        case PKRevealControllerFocusesLeftViewControllerInPresentationMode:
            return [self.leftViewController preferredStatusBarStyle];
            break;
        case PKRevealControllerFocusesRightViewControllerInPresentationMode:
            return [self.rightViewController preferredStatusBarStyle];
            break;

        default:
            return UIStatusBarStyleDefault;
            break;
    }
}

This alone doesn't work however. You still have to say that the status bar style needs to change with setNeedsStatusBarAppearanceUpdate. As Apple says this should be called from inside an animation loop and you can find one in PKRevealController's setFrontViewFrameLinearly method. This is how it looks after I've modified it:

- (void)setFrontViewFrameLinearly:(CGRect)frame
                         animated:(BOOL)animated
                         duration:(CGFloat)duration
                          options:(UIViewAnimationOptions)options
                       completion:(PKDefaultCompletionHandler)completion
{
    [UIView animateWithDuration:duration delay:0.0f options:options animations:^
    {
        self.frontViewContainer.frame = frame;
        if ([[[UIDevice currentDevice] systemVersion] compare:@"7.0" options:NSNumericSearch] != NSOrderedAscending) {
            [self setNeedsStatusBarAppearanceUpdate];
        }
    }
    completion:^(BOOL finished)
    {
        safelyExecuteCompletionBlockOnMainThread(completion, finished);
    }];
}

If you try it out at this point the styles will be mixed up. You can quickly conclude that by the time preferredStatusBarStyle is called the reveal controller state is still not changed. For that go to every method that sets the state, e.g. enterPresentationModeForRightViewControllerAnimated and set the state before it calls any change to the frame (the one is going to trigger the animation loop). I did it in 5 different places.

2. Left/Right menu with inset

For this one I have to say I used a workaround: I've just set a header view on the table view (tableHeaderView property).

Put this in viewDidLoad of your UITableViewController:

UIView *headerView = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0.f, 0.f, self.tableView.frame.size.width, 20.f)];
headerView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];

self.tableView.tableHeaderView = headerView;

Don't forget to add some condition so it doesn't get executed in iOS 6. Use this other answer to know how to do it.

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If you don't need iOS 5- support, you could use autolayout and align topmost views to topLayoutGuide.

iOS6 iOS7


So, for example, if your left view controller is a UIViewController with a UITableView in it, you could snap UITableView's top edge to the topLayoutGuide. You can do it in (1) IB (storyboard) or (2) from code.

I personally prefer the first approach, as far as it removes the need of unnecessary code. You just open your storyboard and snap your table view's top edge to topLayoutGuide. In iOS 7 you'll end up with topLayoutGuide constraint, in iOS6 topLayoutGuide constraint is converted to a common to-container-view constant.

IB way

If you use second approach, you'll have to make sure you don't use topLayoutGuide in iOS6, something like this:

// assume you'r in your UIViewController subclass
if (![self respondsToSelector:@selector(topLayoutGuide)]) 
{
    // topLayoutGuide is not supported, probably iOS6
    // add constraints to snap tableview's top edge to superview's top edge
}
else
{
    // cool, topLayoutGuide is supported, probably iOS7
    // add constraints to snap tableview's top edge to topLayoutGuide
}
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