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I'm new to Python, coming from C#. I know how to publicize class attributes and methods. I'd like to publicize my instance variables. Having intellisense detect them would be ideal. Also, please let me know if this is not pythonic or if I should be doing something else.

class MyClass(Object):
    class_attribute = "Foo"

    #This is the way I'm currently publicizing instance attributes.  
    #Basically I'm using properties instead of instance attributes.
    @property
    def instance_property(self):
        return self._instance_property

    @instance_property.setter
    def instance_property_set(self, value):
        self._instance_property = value
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6  
this type of getter setter is discouraged in python ... why not just make the instance variable name self.instance_property instead of self._instance_property and it should expose in any decent ide –  Joran Beasley Oct 7 '13 at 16:05
    
Using properties like that is definitely not pythonic. I don't know what intellisense likes however, so I can't give you much advice... –  mgilson Oct 7 '13 at 16:06
    
@JoranBeasley but how do consumers know they should populate instance_property? Are they just supposed to know from documentation? –  Steven Wexler Oct 7 '13 at 16:35
    
anything they SHOULDNT mess with should be prepended with one (or two underscores) _varname is equivalent to a protected var (through convention) __varname is (conventionally) equivelent to a private var. –  Joran Beasley Oct 7 '13 at 16:39
2  
often it is done in the init function ... or through documentation, or setting it to an invalid default value that you later check and inform consumer that they must set variable X before calling Calculate() or whatever ... getters and setters are not meant to inform a consumer what variables they should set –  Joran Beasley Oct 7 '13 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class MyClass(Object):
    class_attribute = "Foo"

    def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs):
        self.instance_property = "whatever"

often it(setting required values) is done in the init function ... or through documentation, or setting it to an invalid default value that you later check and inform consumer that they must set variable X before calling Calculate() or whatever ... getters and setters are not meant to inform a consumer what variables they should set

there is no reason to use getters/setters unless you actually need to do some work (not just pass it on to another variable)

a use case for a setter would be

class GPIO(object):
    @property
    def value(self):
        return open("/sys/class/gpio/gpio141/value").read()

    @value.setter
    def set_value(self,val):
         open("/sys/class/gpio/gpio141/value","w").write(val)
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Instance props are set in __init__, am I wrong? :) –  J0HN Oct 7 '13 at 16:17
    
Ummm. Isn't that class property? –  Bibhas Oct 7 '13 at 16:19
    
doesnt matter really ... but yeah ... (as soon as you refer to it as self.instance_property it effectivly becomes tied to the instance .. there I moved it into init –  Joran Beasley Oct 7 '13 at 16:19
    
Who downvoted this, and why? –  Marcin Oct 7 '13 at 16:25
    
i think they did cause originally I had instance_property as a class var instead of settign it in init –  Joran Beasley Oct 7 '13 at 16:29

You are not required to do so. Python community uses a convention that any class member which name have:

  • leading underscore - considered private/protected,
  • double leading underscore considered class private - mimics private access by using name mangling. Member is not accessible by it's name outside the class, as it's prefixed with class name (but still accessible if you directly call it)
  • double leading underscore and double trailing underscore - overrides some behavior, closest C# analogue would be built-in interface implementations and overrides of Object methods. More info in the docs.
  • everything else considered public.

You can do properties, if you actually want to do some calculations upon acessing a member, but it's not considered/enforced as best practice.

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