Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a java interface called BST (short for binary search tree) which has generic types Key,Value where Key extends Comparable.I defined it as below.

public interface BST<Key extends Comparable<Key>,Value> {

    public void put(Key key,Value value);

    public Value get(Key key);

    public void delete(Key key);

    public Iterable<Key> keys();

}

Now I want to define an implementation of the above interface.I tried this

public class BSTImpl<Key extends Comparable<Key> ,Value>  implements BST<Key extends Comparable<Key>,Value> {

... 

}

The above definition causes an error message in eclipse IDE ..The extends token after implements BST<Key seems to be the culprit

Syntax error on token "extends", , expected

If I omit the "extends" token from the definition (as given below),the error goes away, and I can get eclipse to generate the unimplemented methods correctly

public class BSTImpl<Key extends Comparable<Key> ,Value>  implements BST<Key ,Value> {
    @Override
    public void put(Key key, Value value) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub          
    }
    @Override
    public Value get(Key key) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }
    @Override
    public void delete(Key key) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub          
    }
    @Override
    public Iterable<Key> keys() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }
}

Why does the extends token cause an error in the first place? can someone please explain?

share|improve this question
2  
You don't need to repeat that "Key extends whatnot" every time. You do that only when you introduce a type variable. –  Ingo Oct 7 '13 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because

public class BSTImpl<Key extends Comparable<Key> ,Value>  implements BST<Key extends Comparable<Key>,Value> {
                    ^ type declaration                                   ^ type argument

In your class declaration, the generic type is a type declaration, something you can reuse later in the class body. In the interface you are implementing, it is a type argument argument. In other words, you are saying my class implements this interface with this type. you have to give it a specific type. It doesn't make sense to say Key extends Comparable... as a type argument.

The Java Language Spec has more details

The type parameter section follows the class name and is delimited by angle brackets.

and in the section for Superclasses

If the TypeDeclSpecifier is followed by any type arguments, it must be a correct invocation of the type declaration denoted by TypeDeclSpecifier, and none of the type arguments may be wildcard type arguments, or a compile-time error occurs.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a shame use and declaration confusingly share syntax. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 7 '13 at 16:06
    
@TomHawtin-tackline Mind you they do so in C# as well, and arguably in C++ (the angle brackets go elsewhere). In fact it's pretty common for related language features to have the same syntax. C# however resolves this problem neatly by putting the constraints outside the angle brackets, without having to use a different syntax for use and declaration. –  millimoose Oct 7 '13 at 16:11
    
@millimoose It's a philosophy that goes back to at least C. Pre-ANSI types didn't appear next to parameters in function declarations - that came later having a repeat of parameter names (a mistake copied and made worse with C++/C With Classes constructors). Shame really as use and declaration have different needs, and could do without the confusion. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 7 '13 at 18:22

The other answer is correct, but I just wanted to add the fix.

Basically, you pass the type parameters onto the superclass/interface, like this:

public class BSTImpl<Key extends Comparable<Key>, Value> implements BST<Key, Value> {
    ... 
}

Also please adhere to java naming standards and use single letters for your generic parameter babes. Using words is too easily confused with being a class name.

share|improve this answer

The keywords extends and super define constraints on generic types. It only makes sense to constrain type parameters coming in, not type parameters going out.

The situation is analogous to method parameters. When declaring a method, you use:

public void foo(Bar bar) { 
    //          ^ the type is a constraint on bar 
}

(The "constraint" is that any value passed to bar must be Bar or one of its subtypes.)

However, you call the method with just:

foo(someBar);
//  ^ no constraint specified here

That is, it doesn't make sense to constrain the type of a variable where it's used. (That was already done in the declaration.)

In your class declaration it's more confusing because a generic type is both declared and another one is used on the same line. The interpretation of that line is:

class BSTImpl<Key extends Comparable<Key>, Value>
//                ^ a constraint on the types that can be passed to Key
    implements BST<Key, Value>
//                 ^ here we're passing Key to another generic type

Of course, just like with variables, the incoming "type" for Key has to be compatible with the types required where it's used, which is why you have to duplicate the constraints in the declaration of BSTImpl.

(This symmetry also illustrates what generics really are: they're higher-order type constraints, that is a way to specify "types of types".)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.