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I have a large application that reads some parameters from a configuration file.

I'm writing unit tests for a class that generates a result after performing certain operations with both a parameter and a value read from the configuration file:

internal static class Password
{
    private static readonly byte PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY
        = ConfigFile.ReadByte("PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY");

    public static byte Generate(byte passwordPublicKey);
}

In my unit test, I know the values the Password.Generate() method should return for given PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEYand PASSWORD_PUBLIC_KEY. But I'd like the PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY value used to be defined in the unit test class, not in the configuration file:

[TestMethod]
public void PasswordGenerate_CalculatedProperly()
{
    byte passwordPublicKey = 0x22;
    Password_Accessor.PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY = 0xF0;
    byte expectedGenerated = 0xAA;

    byte generated = Password_Accessor.Generate(passwordPublicKey);

    Assert.AreEqual(expectedGenerated, generated);
}

Is there a way I can write the private static readonly thru code, so I don't have to rely any configuration file for my tests?

share|improve this question
    
Note the question is different to this one: stackoverflow.com/q/6851816/1192381 – J.A.I.L. Oct 7 '13 at 16:13
    
The canonical answer is "do not use a statically initialised private static field" - refactor the Password class so it acquires the value for PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY from a collaborator class that you can then mock up. In this case, it seems making ConfigFile non-static would be the answer. – millimoose Oct 7 '13 at 16:25
2  
Generally speaking, static is the sworn enemy of unit testing. – millimoose Oct 7 '13 at 16:25
up vote 6 down vote accepted

To do it in a clean way, you need to make Password more testable. To do this, consider this design:

internal static class Password
{
    public static void Configure(IPrivateKeyProvider keyProvider)
    {
        keyProvider = keyProvider;
    }

    public static byte Generate(byte passwordPublicKey); // use keyProvider

    private static IPrivateKeyProvider* keyProvider;
}

internal interface IPrivateKeyProvider
{
    byte GetPrivateKey();
}

internal class ConfigPrivateKeyProvider : IPrivateKeyProvider
{
    private static readonly byte PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY
         = ConfigFile.ReadByte("PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY");

    public byte GetPrivateKey()
    {
        return PASSWORD_PRIVATE_KEY;
    }
}

internal class PrivateKeyProviderStub : IPrivateKeyProvider
{
    public PrivateKeyProviderStub(byte privateKey)
    {
        this.privateKey = privateKey;
    }

    public byte GetPrivateKey()
    {
        return this.privateKey;
    }
}

Now your production code can use ConfigPrivateKeyProvider and tests can use the PrivateKeyProviderStub.

It is a bit simplified to retain Password as a static class. I'd recommend refactoring this also into an ordinary class, a singleton maybe if it's appropriate.

Note also that there are many testing frameworks that allow to generate mocks and stubs conveniently on the fly (Rhino Mocks for example), so there would be no need to manually implement PrivateKeyProviderStub.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I'll take this approach, but using a mock for ConfigFile class instead, so I don't have to modify the Password class for the tests. – J.A.I.L. Oct 8 '13 at 6:33

I am not a .NET expert, so take this with a grain of salt.

One of the values of unit testing is showing you that you need to rethink your code. If it's hard to test, it needs to be rewritten.

Figure out a way to inject an abstraction for your file into Password, and then create a mock implementation of that abstraction (using Moq or Rhino Mocks, for example).

But as you have it now, I don't think there is any way around using a file. You would just have to tell your test to look at a different file instead.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
"You would just have to tell your test to look at a different file instead." Thank you. That I'll do. Having a mock for ConfigFile wich won't actually read from a config file, but return the values I can assign programatically before the Password class calls ReadByte(). – J.A.I.L. Oct 8 '13 at 6:35

No. There is no way to access private fields.

For unit testing you usually want to access internal stuff and you can do that using InternalsVisibleTo. But even with that private members stay private. You might want to define a getter for those fields.

Edit: With a bit cumbersome syntax you can access private fields using PrivateObjects.

share|improve this answer
    
Using <ClassUnderTest>_Accessor wrappers I have writing permissions to private fields in internal classes. And that's done having the application under test in one project, and the unit testing classes in another project. So, I don't think the problem is the fact that the fields are private, but the fact that they are static readonly and have already been given a value when I'm testing them. – J.A.I.L. Oct 8 '13 at 6:28

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