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I tried to write "modern" stack (with any types of data) and one time make a mistake. That was an incorrect number of parameters to function called using pointer. But that cause no problems while program run.

So this is test example, whitch works absolutely correct.

#include <stdio.h>

int add(int a1, int a2)
{
    return a1 + a2;
}

int main(void)
{
    int (*pointer)() = add;
    printf("12 + 13 = %d\n", pointer(12, 13, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 14 = %d\n", pointer(12, 14, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 15 = %d\n", pointer(12, 15, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 16 = %d\n", pointer(12, 16, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 17 = %d\n", pointer(12, 17, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 18 = %d\n", pointer(12, 18, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    printf("12 + 19 = %d\n", pointer(12, 19, 123, 13, 21,3, 125, 234, 523));
    return 0;
}

As I understand, then calls an add function, 9 parameters pushes into call stack. But function add() uses only two of them. Why such multiply calling has no effect like a crash of program? (OS: FreeBSD 9.1)

Addition: I changed code:

printf("12 + 13 = %d\n", pointer(12));
printf("12 + 13 = %d\n", pointer(13));
...

compile flags: -Wall -O4 tst_call.c gcc (ver. 4.6) produces no warnings, but output is incorrect:

$ gcc -Wall -O4 tst_call.c
$ ./a.out
12 + 13 = -10236
12 + 14 = 12615693
12 + 15 = 12615694
12 + 16 = 12615695
12 + 17 = 12615696
12 + 18 = 12615697
12 + 19 = 12615698

gcc49 (ver. 4.9) produces list of warnings ( warning: 'a2' is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]). Here is output:

$ gcc49 -Wall -O4 tst_call.c
$ ./a.out
12 + 13 = 12
12 + 14 = 13
12 + 15 = 14
12 + 16 = 15
12 + 17 = 16
12 + 18 = 17
12 + 19 = 18
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1  
because the C compiler is really permissive, second only to a web browser –  UmNyobe Oct 7 '13 at 17:36
    
"So this is test example, whitch works absolutely correct." - not exactly for every compiler: gnu g++ compiler reports errors for the OP's code. –  Igor Popov Oct 7 '13 at 17:37
1  
gun g++ is a C++ compiler –  UmNyobe Oct 7 '13 at 17:39
    
@UmNyobe oops, my mistake! –  Igor Popov Oct 7 '13 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The traditional calling convention in C has the caller pop all the arguments to the function. If you pushed 50 parameters (regardless of the number the function used) it would still pop all 50 back off.

As such, the stack is preserved regardless of mismatches between the number of parameters pushed vs. number of parameters expected/used by the function. Of course, if you push fewer parameters than the function expects, things may not work quite so well. Likewise, if you manage to get a mismatch, with (for example) both the caller and the function thinking they're supposed to remove the parameters from the stack, things will go badly.

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Parameters are pushed onto the stack in reverse order. In this case, you declared your pointer to function without specifying parameters, so the compiler won't give an error with 9 parameters. And when the 9 parameters are passed, add will see the first two parameters properly (they'll be at the beginning of the stack as expected), so it will perform normally, on the first two parameters. It will ignore the rest of the parameters.

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