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I have a list of Objects that need to have multiple, conditionally applied, operations applied to each element. Is it more efficient to take a "if-for" approach or a "for-if" approach. To put it another way, should I minimize the number of if statements or the number of for loops? Is there a standard for this?

What would be a good reliable way to determine this?

"If-For" to Approach minimize if statements

public void ifForMethod() {
    if (conditionA) {
        for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
            doA(o);
        }
    }

    if (conditionB) {
        for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
            doB(o);
        }
    }
}

"For-If" Approach to minimize for loops

public void forIfMethod() {
    for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
        if (conditionA) {
            doA(o);
        }
        if (conditionB) {
            doB(o);
        }

    }
}

Assumptions

  • The conditions are simple booleans and will not change while iterating.
  • One or more conditions will be true. (there are more than 2 conditions)
  • Each condition is independent of the other conditions.
  • The inner methods do not conflict or interact with each other at all. The order in which they are executed is irrelevant.
share|improve this question
    
The second makes more sense. It shows that you will always loop over the elements, then based off a condition it will change the element in regards to that. It also could have to do with multithreading. If conditionA or conditionB change while it is in the loop, "For-If" would provide different results than "If-For". It depends on what you want to accomplish. If conditionA can be true at the same time as conditionB, then the "For-If" is more efficient. –  Obicere Oct 7 '13 at 17:42
    
What is more readable for you? Both are O(n) , only change constant in worst case. –  nachokk Oct 7 '13 at 17:42
1  
It depends on what doA and doB do. –  Simeon Visser Oct 7 '13 at 17:42
1  
The standard is the one that Albert Einstein stated: "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." –  Hot Licks Oct 7 '13 at 17:57
    
@Obicere The conditions will evaluate the same way every time. There are actually several conditions and on average 75% will be true. –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 19:01

10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, let's take a look at the complexity of the methods that you've shown so far:

  • The ifForMethod performs k checks, m of which return true. For each of these m, there is an iteration over n objects. The complexity, then, is k+nm.
  • The forIfMethod iterates over n objects and performs k comparisons on each iteration. The complexity, then, is k+n(k-1)=nk.

In both cases, all k conditions have to be evaluated at least once, so the difference here really is in the nm and n(k-1) addends. Asymptotically, m is a just a fraction of k (you said m is approximately .75k), so these are both O(nk), but k+nm < k+n(k-1), so the ifForMethod might be a faster than forIfMethod. The difference in actual run time is going to depend on factors such as the actual time that it takes to iterate over the array, as well as the magnitude of k. You're going to start getting into issues such as memory locality (both for your objects as well as your code).

Here's an approach that you might find interesting, though. Ideally, you'd only want to iterate through the list of objects once, and you wouldn't want to have to check the boolean conditions multiple times. You could abstract away the actions that you're performing in such a way that you could combine them into a single action (and you'd only incorporate those actions that correspond to the conditions that are true), and then perform that compound action on each element in the list. Here's some code that does this.

The idea is that there are Actions, and that you can construct an Action that performs doA and an Action that performs doB. Based on the conditions, you can create a compound action that includes the doA action if the doA condition is true, and the doB action if the doB condition is true. Then you iterate through the objects, and call perform the compound action on each object. Asymptotically, this is a k+nm method, so in theory it performs nicely, but again, the actual performance here will depend on some of those tricky constants, and memory locality issues.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class CompoundActionExample {

    /**
     * An action is used to do something to an argument.
     */
    interface Action {
        void act( Object argument );
    }

    /**
     * A compound action is an action that acts on an argument
     * by passing the argument to some other actions.
     */
    static class CompoundAction implements Action {
        /**
         * The list of actions that the compound action will perform.  Additional
         * actions can be added using {@link #add(Action)}, and this list is only
         * accessed through the {@link #act(Object)} method.
         */
        private final List<CompoundActionExample.Action> actions;

        /**
         * Create a compound action with the specified list of actions.
         */
        CompoundAction( final List<CompoundActionExample.Action> actions ) {
            this.actions = actions;
        }

        /**
         * Create a compound action with a fresh list of actions.
         */
        CompoundAction() { 
            this( new ArrayList<CompoundActionExample.Action>() );
        }

        /**
         * Add an action to the compound action.
         */
        public void add( CompoundActionExample.Action action ) {
            actions.add( action );
        }

        /**
         * Act on an argument by passing the argument to each of the 
         * compound action's actions.
         */
        public void act( final Object argument) {
            for ( CompoundActionExample.Action action : actions ) {
                action.act( argument );
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Some conditions and a list of objects
        final boolean conditionA = true;
        final boolean conditionB = false;
        final Object[] listOfObjects = { "object1", "object2", "object3" };

        // A compound action that encapsulates all the things you want to do
        final CompoundAction compoundAction = new CompoundAction();

        // If conditionA is true, add an action to the compound action that 
        // will perform doA.  conditionA is evaluated exactly once.
        if ( conditionA ) {
            compoundAction.add( new Action() {
                public void act( final Object argument) {
                    System.out.println( "doA("+argument+")" ); // doA( argument );
                }
            });
        }

        // If conditionB is true, add an action to the compound action that
        // will perform doB. conditionB is evaluted exactly once.
        if ( conditionB )  {
            compoundAction.add( new Action() {
                public void act(Object argument) {
                    System.out.println( "doB("+argument+")" ); // doB( argument );
                }
            });
        }

        // For each object, apply the compound action
        for ( final Object o : listOfObjects ) {
            compoundAction.act( o );
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is a very interesting design idea. How does that object creation compare with performing the simple boolean check over and over again? –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 21:53
    
@MikeRylander I just commented on the question, but I think (and I haven't tested this), that as k (the number of conditions) gets bigger and bigger, this approach will outperform it, since iterating through the fixed list of actions in the compound action will be less work than rechecking the extra conditions. For small k, it's probably not worth it (in terms of speed, anyhow; in a more complex architecture, this has some extensibility benefits, too), but I hope you'd see improvements as k gets bigger. –  Joshua Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 21:56
    
@MikeRylander Of course, if the boolean conditions are expensive to compute (i.e., if they weren't simply boolean variables), there's a big benefit to be had in not computing them again and again on each iteration. When I'd put the answer together, it hadn't been clarified yet whether they were fixed or dynamic. –  Joshua Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 21:58
    
@MikeRylander The object creation shouldn't be much of a problem. That's just m objects being created. If the actions are well defined and fixed (as they are in this case), you could define them ahead of time and have them sitting around somewhere, just to be added to the compound action as necessary. So, the object creation won't slow things down noticeably; the question is whether the extra method dispatch will (since now there's a level of indirection; you don't just call doA, you call an object's act method which then calls doA). –  Joshua Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 22:03
    
I have to say that this is a thorough analysis of the problem. You provided a good explanation of the relative complexity as well as pointed out that complexity is not a guaranty of performance. To go even further you provided an excellent alternative approach that address the short comings of the other approaches. –  Mike Rylander Oct 8 '13 at 20:05

There is no reason to make 2 passes over the list.

Assumptions: predicates are simple booleans, if they have to be evaluated then obviously the cost can change things.

If ((condtionA || conditionB) == true) then both If-for and For-If are both 1 pass. If both predicates can be true then obviously you only want to make one pass.

It doesn't matter what doA and doB since we're assuming they're they same in both If-for and For-If.

If the predicates can change over the course of evaluation then that must be considered.

You're asking a general question so answers are general and vague without more details.

Ok now that you've provided additional info (the list is only 5 elements long, this is part of a build process, the predicates are static booleans) we can see that the bottleneck here is the doA/B functions. Therefore you should only go through the loop once. The static boolean checks are negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not correct, it depends on what doA and doB do. –  Simeon Visser Oct 7 '13 at 17:56
    
@SimeonVisser please explain how making two passes can be faster than one. Assuming (conditionA || conditionB) == true. –  koodawg Oct 7 '13 at 20:23
    
this is not about speed but correctness. Depending on the behaviour of doA, if it is necessary to perform all doA operations first then it may not be possible to interweave doA and doB calls. –  Simeon Visser Oct 7 '13 at 20:30
    
OP asked which is more efficient. –  koodawg Oct 7 '13 at 20:33
    
@SimeonVisser ah, I see your point about doA/doB behaviour - but you're making assumptions OP didn't provide. –  koodawg Oct 7 '13 at 20:34

Using what you called the "If-For" way rather than "For-If" is (perhaps a slightly more general version of) an optimization called loop unswitching. Whether it's actually a good idea depends on several factors, such as (but not limited to)

  • whether that transformation is even allowed (ie conditions have no side effects and doA and doB may be reordered)
  • what you're optimizing for (eg speed, readability, or w/e) though in this case that doesn't really make a difference
  • whether the array fits in cache (iterating over it twice could double the number of cache misses)
  • what the (JIT) compiler makes of it exactly, for example whether the conditions actually compile to branches or not or maybe the compiler does the loop unswitching for you
  • the processor microarchitecture (some µarchs dislike branches inside loops more than others, even if those branches are highly predictable)
share|improve this answer

It Depends on the nature of the business problem your code is trying to solve. If both conditionA AND conditionB are simple Boolean variables but not expressions, then the For-If is going to be better as you are cycling through the list of objects only once.

We are basically comparing which performs better : Enumerating from a list of objects multiple times or evaluating a boolean expression multiple times. If your conditionA/conditionB are very complex Boolean expressions, then your If-For would be a better approach.

share|improve this answer
    
The conditions would essentially be simple Boolean expression. They are more complex but will return the same value every time, the return value can be saved and reused. –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 18:46
    
Il the conditions results can be reused then going to the for-if approach would be best IMHO because you will iterate on the list only once –  Davz Oct 7 '13 at 18:48

lets consider that we are doing same number of operation in both the for loop and inside if .With this standard i will go with the first approach which using if statement before executing for loop just to avoid the number of iteration in for loop.

Also as you are using advance for loop which takes more time to execute the same operation compare to normal for loop.

please correct me if i am wrong.

share|improve this answer
1  
The special for loop is just syntactic sugar that makes the code shorter. It won't affect the performance. –  Joshua Taylor Oct 7 '13 at 21:21
    
This is true if all conditions are false, what about when they are true and the loop iterates multiple times? –  Mike Rylander Oct 8 '13 at 16:34

It depends! The ifForMethod() solution is best, if there are real cases where neither conditionA nor conditionB is true. If there are cases where conditionA and conditionB are true, solution forIfMethod() is the best but the conditions should be precalculated before entering the loop.

But you can modify forIfMethod() to make it suitable for all cases:

public void forIfMethod() {
  boolean a = conditionA;
  boolean b = conditionB;
  if (a || b) {
    for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
      if (a) {
        doA(o);
      }
      if (b) {
        doB(o);
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
There are about a dozen conditions and on average 75% are true. There will always be at-least one that is true. –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 18:53

the first one (if-for) sounds good for me.. because for first case there will be a single checking for whole for loop. But in the second cases there will be checking for every loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but what about iterating through the loop multiple times? –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 18:55

The second one is more efficent in terms of how many comparisons you make.

Check condition a, 1 calculation. If true, Object.size calculatons.

Check condition b, 1 calculation. If true, Object.size calculations. Min, 2, Max Object.size * 2

For Method 2, you will always have Object.size * 2 calculations performed.

Consider your "worst case" if both checks are false. Way 1 will only do 2 calculations. Way 2 will perform Object.size * 2. It has nothing to do with your function as in both cases it will always take the same amount of time in both cases.

Even in your "best case" if both checks are true, you are still performing that check N-1 times more for A, and N-1 times more for B.

Best way I think to do it with the fewest calculations.

public void ifForMethod() {
    if (conditionA) {
        if(conditionB){
            for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
                doA(o);
                doB(o);
            }
        else{
            for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
                doA(o);
            }    
        }
    }
    else if (conditionB) {
        for (Object o : listOfObjects) {
            doB(o);
        }
    }
}

You perform 2 check operations and then only loop through the list once, at max.

share|improve this answer
    
As I add more conditions wont this get unmaintainable (have really deep nested conditions)? –  Mike Rylander Oct 8 '13 at 16:39
    
I'm trying to provide the way to perform the operation in the least amount of calculations. In tihs case the code itself will be a larger file size then other given examples, but will execute in the fewest min/max calculations. Really though both cases you gave would be FINE with modern computers so I figuring you wanted to ask about theory and not practice. This will perform on the same magnitude as your option 2, but will just perform less calculations. So if you want to be the BEST code you can be, and don't mind typing it all go with this, otherwise go with your number 2 for clean code –  Dan Ciborowski - MSFT Oct 8 '13 at 20:07

I think it depends on more things, like: If you find the conditionA, will the loop break? The conditionA and conditionB can coexist? Could I use if-else with them?

Just looking for what you've presented, I think the second aproach is better. You're only looping once and checking twice in the same loop. In my opinion it's also more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
The loop will not break, yes all conditions can be true. –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 18:50

Several things:

  1. Is this a premature optimization? Does it really matter if one way is faster than the other, depending on the data it might not be a human noticeable difference.
  2. I would question the design of the software. Why is the same Object have 2 possible conditions? I would recommend breaking the design into multiple objects. Perhaps using subclasses to do the different logic or use the Strategy Pattern. I can't be more specific without a better idea of what you are doing.
share|improve this answer
    
1. If I can make it faster, why wouldn't I? Also this happens millions of times every day. 2. This is in the build step of a complex builder object. –  Mike Rylander Oct 7 '13 at 18:58
    
@Mike Amdahl's law. You wouldn't make things faster if you need to spend a lot of extra time to make the overall program run unnoticeably faster. I would suspect optimizing the do methods would be time better spent. –  kfaerber Oct 7 '13 at 22:27

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