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This is a simple problem, but for the life of me I cannot find the answer.

I have a vector of numbers:

numbers <- c(4,23,4,23,5,43,54,56,657,67,67,435,
         453,435,324,34,456,56,567,65,34,435)

I want to R to count the number of times a value "x" appears in the vector.

Any help?

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18  
homework... or someone learning R. Or both! shrug –  JD Long Dec 17 '09 at 17:29
9  
Haha, I am far too old for homework. Just tinkering with some data. –  RQuestions Dec 17 '09 at 17:31
    
Thanks! Worked great. –  RQuestions Dec 17 '09 at 17:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 91 down vote accepted

You can just use table():

> a <- table(numbers)
> a
numbers
  4   5  23  34  43  54  56  65  67 324 435 453 456 567 657 
  2   1   2   2   1   1   2   1   2   1   3   1   1   1   1

Then you can subset it:

> a[names(a)==435]
435 
  3

Or convert it into a data.frame if you're more comfortable working with that:

> as.data.frame(table(numbers))
   numbers Freq
1        4    2
2        5    1
3       23    2
4       34    2
...
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1  
Don't forget about potential floating point issues, especially with table, which coerces numbers to strings. –  hadley Dec 17 '09 at 18:10
    
That's a great point. These are all integers, so it isn't a real issue in this example, right? –  Shane Dec 17 '09 at 18:18
    
not exactly. The elements of the table are of class integer class(table(numbers)[1]), but 435 is a floating point number. To make it an integer you can use 435L. –  Ian Fellows Dec 18 '09 at 2:11
    
@Ian - I am confused about why 435 is a float in this example. Can you clarify a bit? thanks. –  Heather Stark Jan 31 '13 at 13:52
    
@HeatherStark This is because all numbers, unless integers are explicitly requested, are floats by default. –  baudtack Nov 5 '13 at 5:31

The most direct way is sum(numbers == x).

numbers == x creates a logical vector which is TRUE at every location that x occurs, and when suming, the logical vector is coerced to numeric which converts TRUE to 1 and FALSE to 0.

However, note that for floating point numbers it's better to use something like: sum(abs(numbers - x) < 1e-6).

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good point about the floating point issue. That bites my butt more than I generally like to admit. –  JD Long Dec 17 '09 at 18:13
2  
@Jason while it does answer the question directly, my guess is that folks liked the more general solution that provides the answer for all x in the data rather than a specific known value of x. To be fair, that was what the original question was about. As I said in my answer below, "I find it is rare that I want to know the frequency of one value and not all of the values..." –  JBecker Apr 22 '13 at 20:46

I would probably do something like this

length(which(numbers==x))

But really, a better way is

table(numbers)
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5  
table(numbers) is going to do a lot more work than the easiest solution, sum(numbers==x), because it's going to figure out the counts of all the other numbers in the list too. –  Ken Williams Dec 18 '09 at 19:41

My preferred solution uses rle, which will return a value (the label, x in your example) and a length, which represents how many times that value appeared in sequence.

By combining rle with sort, you have an extremely fast way to count the number of times any value appeared. This can be helpful with more complex problems.

Example:

> numbers <- c(4,23,4,23,5,43,54,56,657,67,67,435,453,435,324,34,456,56,567,65,34,435)
> a <- rle(sort(numbers))
> a
  Run Length Encoding
    lengths: int [1:15] 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 ...
    values : num [1:15] 4 5 23 34 43 54 56 65 67 324 ...

If the value you want doesn't show up, or you need to store that value for later, make a a data.frame.

> b <- data.frame(number=a$values, n=a$lengths)
> b
    values n
 1       4 2
 2       5 1
 3      23 2
 4      34 2
 5      43 1
 6      54 1
 7      56 2
 8      65 1
 9      67 2
 10    324 1
 11    435 3
 12    453 1
 13    456 1
 14    567 1
 15    657 1

I find it is rare that I want to know the frequency of one value and not all of the values, and rle seems to be the quickest way to get count and store them all.

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1  
Is the advantage of this, vs table, that it gives a result in a more readily usable format? thanks –  Heather Stark Jan 31 '13 at 13:54
    
@HeatherStark I would say there are two advantages. The first is definitely that it is a more readily used format than the table output. The second is that sometimes I want to count the number of elements "in a row" rather than within the whole dataset. For example, c(rep('A', 3), rep('G', 4), 'A', rep('G', 2), rep('C', 10)) would return values = c('A','G','A','G','C') and lengths=c(3, 4, 1, 2, 10) which is sometimes useful. –  JBecker Apr 22 '13 at 20:42

There is a standard function in R for that

tabulate(numbers)

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here's one fast and dirty way:

x <- 23
length(subset(numbers, numbers==x))
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There is also count(a) from plyr package

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That's what I would use. –  Olga Mu Aug 27 '13 at 0:22

table(number) works great

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