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I am trying to implement a thread block using a map so that no more than one operation can be handled on a single customer at a time. This is talking to a web service and requires multiple steps to accomplish the full workflow. I need to be able to lock on a single customer at a time but allow other threads to execute without blocking the flow.

Here is my test cases to see how to get it working. What I am seeing is that the second thread cannot do get into the synchronized block of doSynchronizedSomething until the first thread has cleared. I thought this should work, but it is not working as expected.

Here are the results and you will notice that the millis are three seconds apart. I also checked to make sure that the CustomerLocks are not the same object in my test case. Is this possible?

Starting operation 123456 at time 1381173121688
Done with operation for 123456 at time 1381173124689
Starting operation 234567 at time 1381173124689
Done with operation for 234567 at time 1381173127690

Code

    package simplethreadlock;

    public class CustomerLock {

        private String customerId;

        public CustomerLock(String customerId) {

        }

        public String getCustomerId() {
            return customerId;
        }

        public void setCustomerId(String customerId) {
            this.customerId = customerId;
        }
    }


    package simplethreadlock;

    import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;

    public class CustomerLockingMap {


        private static ConcurrentHashMap<String, CustomerLock> locks = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, CustomerLock>();

        public static CustomerLock aquireLock(String customerId) {
            CustomerLock lock = locks.get(customerId);
            if (lock == null) {
                lock = new CustomerLock(customerId);
                locks.put(customerId, lock);
            }
            return lock; 
        }
    }


    package simplethreadlock;

    import org.junit.Assert;
    import org.junit.Test;

    public class CutomerLockingTest {

    @Test
    public void testLock() throws InterruptedException {
        final String customerId1 = "123456";
        final String customerId2 = "234567";

        final CustomerLock customer1Lock1 = CustomerLockingMap
                .aquireLock(customerId1);
        final CustomerLock customer1Lock2 = CustomerLockingMap
                .aquireLock(customerId1);

        final CustomerLock customer2Lock1 = CustomerLockingMap
                .aquireLock(customerId2);
        final CustomerLock customer2Lock2 = CustomerLockingMap
                .aquireLock(customerId2);

         CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1);

        Assert.assertNotEquals(customer1Lock1, customer2Lock1);

        new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                try {

                    doSynchronziedSomething(customer1Lock1, customerId1);

                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }).start();


        new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                try {
                    doSynchronziedSomething(customer2Lock1, customerId2);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

            }
        }).start();


        new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                try {
                    doSynchronziedSomething(customer1Lock2, customerId1);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }).start();


        new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                try {

                    doSynchronziedSomething(customer2Lock2, customerId2);

                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

            }
        }).start();

        latch.await(8, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    }

        private void doSynchronziedSomething(final CustomerLock lock, final String customerId) throws InterruptedException {
            synchronized (lock) {
                System.out.println("Starting operation " + customerId + " at time "
                        + System.currentTimeMillis());
                Thread.sleep(3000);
                System.out.println("Done with operation for " + customerId
                        + " at time " + System.currentTimeMillis());
            }
        }
    }

Edit

Silly me it is Thread.start() but if you are looking at the example for help on this I did add the CountDownLatch so that the unit test will not exit before the threads have had time to finish.

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4  
.run() or .start()!? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 7 '13 at 19:21
    
Thanks you rock!!!!! That was stupid on my part. I will gladly click your solution if you want to post the answer. –  Chris Hinshaw Oct 7 '13 at 19:23
    
I was wondering why I didn't need the latch to wait for the threads to finish. –  Chris Hinshaw Oct 7 '13 at 19:30
    
because your threads didn't have concurrency –  Roman C Oct 7 '13 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Thread#run() is a normal synchronous method call. What you want is Thread#start() which executes a native call to start the OS thread.

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+1 answered first in comment, actually. –  hexafraction Oct 7 '13 at 19:34
someThread.run()

is not a way to start a thread. It only runs that thread's internal runnable within the current thread, before any subsequent lines. Use .start() to actually start the thread as a thread, and let the two threads(and main thread) run simultaneously.

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