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I just want to know how to create simple animations like blinking, moving stuffs on C# console applications. Is there any special method for this?

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+1 Loved this question, IMMD =) –  Rubens Farias Dec 17 '09 at 17:41

6 Answers 6

Traditional Console Spinner:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ConsoleSpiner spin = new ConsoleSpiner();
        Console.Write("Working....");
        while (true) 
        {
            spin.Turn();
        }
    }

public class ConsoleSpiner
{
    int counter;
    public ConsoleSpiner()
    {
        counter = 0;
    }
    public void Turn()
    {
        counter++;        
        switch (counter % 4)
        {
            case 0: Console.Write("/"); break;
            case 1: Console.Write("-"); break;
            case 2: Console.Write("\\"); break;
            case 3: Console.Write("|"); break;
        }
        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.CursorLeft - 1, Console.CursorTop);
    }
}
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Yes, there are quite a few methods for this.

In particular, you may want to look at the following Console methods:

  1. SetCursorPosition (you can move the cursor around, and overwrite elements)
  2. MoveBufferArea (copy/paste over the top of regions)
  3. ForegroundColor and BackgroundColor (change coloring)
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You'll need to use Console.ForegroundColor, Console.BackgroundColor and Console.SetCursorPosition(int, int)

EDIT: For inspiration, Let's Dance

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Just saw this and a few other threads about it and love this kind of stuff! I took Tuukka's nice piece of code and improved it a bit so the class can easily be set to just about any spin sequence. I'll probably add some accessors and an overloaded constructor to polish it off and put it in the ol' toolbox. Fun stuff!

class ConsoleSpinner
{
    int counter;
    string[] sequence;

    public ConsoleSpinner()
    {
        counter = 0;
        sequence = new string[] { "/", "-", "\\", "|" };
        sequence = new string[] { ".", "o", "0", "o"};
        sequence = new string[] { "+", "x" };
        sequence = new string[] { "V", "<", "^", ">" };
        sequence = new string[] { ".   ", "..  ", "... ", "...." };
    }

    public void Turn()
    {
        counter++;

        if (counter >= sequence.Length)
            counter = 0;

        Console.Write(sequence[counter]);
        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.CursorLeft - sequence[counter].Length, Console.CursorTop);
    }
}
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I thought I'd chime in with my version of the previously listed code. Here it is:

class ConsoleSpinner
{
    bool increment = true,
         loop = false;
    int counter = 0;
    int delay;
    string[] sequence;

    public ConsoleSpinner(string sSequence = "dots", int iDelay = 100, bool bLoop = false)
    {
        delay = iDelay;
        if (sSequence == "dots")
        {
            sequence = new string[] { ".   ", "..  ", "... ", "...." };
            loop = true;
        }
        else if (sSequence == "slashes")
            sequence = new string[] { "/", "-", "\\", "|" };
        else if (sSequence == "circles")
            sequence = new string[] { ".", "o", "0", "o" };
        else if (sSequence == "crosses")
            sequence = new string[] { "+", "x" };
        else if (sSequence == "arrows")
            sequence = new string[] { "V", "<", "^", ">" };
    }

    public void Turn()
    {
        if (loop)
        {
            if (counter >= sequence.Length - 1)
                increment = false;
            if (counter <= 0)
                increment = true;

            if (increment)
                counter++;
            else if (!increment)
                counter--;
        }
        else
        {
            counter++;

            if (counter >= sequence.Length)
                counter = 0;
        }

        Console.Write(sequence[counter]);
        Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.CursorLeft - sequence[counter].Length, Console.CursorTop);

        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(delay);
    }
}

Adds delay (unfortunately through Thread.Sleep() but, hey), the ability to loop the animation forwards and backwards (starts to reverse when it hits the end), and general improvements overall. Enjoy!

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i'm not TOO sure i know exactly what you're on about. but i'll give it a shot. I think the biggest and best way to cause the "blinking" affect (or what i think the blinking affect is) is to use a carriage return. The best way to explain it to you is to show you the Foo Bar experiment. start a new project, and in your Main function, try this.

Console.WriteLine("Foo/nBar");

The output will look like this

Foo
Bar

But if you use a carriage return.

Console.WriteLine("Foo/rBar");

The output will look like this

Bar

The reason is that Foo is written, then the carriage return takes you BACK to the start of the line, then Bar is written. All you ever see is Bar. This can be helpful for "Moving" things on one line, instead of rewriting the same things again on multiple lines. A way to do progression would be to use Console.Write(); Try this.

Console.Write("Loading");
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    Console.Write(".");
}

The output should be

Loading

Followed by a Fullstop every second for 10 seconds.

If you combine the Carriage return with the Console.Write(); function you can write multiple things on a single line, clear the line and write something else, or indeed, the same thing just moved slightly. (This would of course need more than i have shown you, like recording where the "object" you are controlling is situated. If you would like a short example i would be happy to do one, just comment and ask me for it :)

Edit: I noticed people mentioning colour, which i forgot. If you were doing animation i guess colour would be a must. ForegroundColor and BackgroundColor are where it's at. note that ForegroundColor will apply to the next characters written to the console, it will not completely recolour the Console. /Edit

I hope this helps,

Skintkingle ;)

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This does not, unfortunately, work for most cases. You can't go UP a line with \r, so you're very limited without using Console.SetCursorPosition –  Reed Copsey Dec 17 '09 at 17:51
    
Ah yes of course. I dont play around in the Console much anymore, i forget the most obvious of things. :) –  Skintkingle Dec 17 '09 at 17:56

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