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I can't figure out why the second while loop is not executing. It has an access violation on result[count] = atoi... I thought adding the strcpy would help because I realized the original string was being modified, but it made no difference. Also, I am using C++ actually, but most of the source is in C where speed is necessary.

int* split(const char* str, const char* delim)
{
    char* tok;
    int* result;
    int count = 0;

    char* oldstr = (char*)malloc(sizeof(str));
    strcpy(oldstr, str);

    tok = strtok((char*)str, delim);
    while (tok != NULL)
    {
        count++;
        tok = strtok(NULL, delim);
    }

    result = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int) * count);

    count = 0;
    tok = strtok((char*)oldstr, delim);
    while (tok != NULL)
    {
        result[count] = atoi(tok);
        count++;
        tok = strtok(NULL, delim);
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
there is no need to cast from malloc() –  jev Oct 7 '13 at 23:28
    
If speed is so important, you should find a solution which doesn't scan every input character three times. (Or four with the strcpy.) You may well find it easier to write an efficient solution in C++. –  rici Oct 8 '13 at 1:24
    
I actually had done it in C++ originally and switched to C because I thought it would be faster, and it does seem to be. When this code executes it seems to be about the same speed (not a problem), but the rendering runs about 1/4 faster because it uses C arrays instead of vectors. Not sure if this could be done in C++ without vectors. If it could, that's probably the best solution. –  Synaps3 Oct 9 '13 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted
    char* oldstr = (char*)malloc(sizeof(str));
    strcpy(oldstr, str);

You don't allocate enough space. Since str is a char *, you are allocating however many bytes a char * takes on your platform, which is probably not enough to hold a string. You want:

    char* oldstr = malloc(strlen(str)+1);
    strcpy(oldstr, str);

Or, for simplicity:

    char* oldstr = strdup(str);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for strdup() –  rici Oct 7 '13 at 19:54

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