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tlndr: how to tell in a function if it's called from an except block (directly/indirectly). python2.7/cpython.

I use python 2.7 and try to provide something similar to py3's __context__ for my custom exception class:

class MyErr(Exception):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        Exception.__init__(self, *args)
        self.context = sys.exc_info()[1]
    def __str__(self):
        return repr(self.args) + ' from ' + repr(self.context)

This seems to work fine:

try:
   1/0
except:
   raise MyErr('bang!')

#>__main__.MyErr: ('bang!',) from ZeroDivisionError('integer division or modulo by zero',)

Sometimes I need MyErr to be raised outside of an exception block. This is fine too:

raise MyErr('just so')

#>__main__.MyErr: ('just so',) from None

If, however, there has been a handled exception before this point, it's being incorrectly set as a context of MyErr:

try:
    print xxx
except Exception as e:
    pass

# ...1000 lines of code....
raise MyErr('look out')

#>__main__.MyErr: ('look out',) from NameError("name 'xxx' is not defined",) <-- BAD

I guess the reason is that sys.exc_info simply returns the "last" and not the "current" exception:

This function returns a tuple of three values that give information about the exception that is currently being handled. <...> Here, “handling an exception” is defined as “executing or having executed an except clause.”

So, my question is: how to tell if the interpreter is executing an except clause (and not has it executed in the past). In other words: is there a way to know in MyErr.__init__ if there is an except up on the stack?

My app is not portable, any Cpython specific hacks are welcome.

share|improve this question
    
This works fine for me. My output is only "#>__main__.MyErr: ('look out',)". sys.exc_info doesn't return the last exception. It returns the exception currently being handled. It returns (None, None, None) when called outside an except block. –  shshank Oct 7 '13 at 21:01
    
@shshank: are you using python 2.7? –  georg Oct 7 '13 at 22:04
1  
Python 2.7.4. need to write longer comment –  shshank Oct 7 '13 at 22:12
    
@shshank: are you sure? I've tested all 2.7.x - the same thing. ideone.com/rthInF –  georg Oct 7 '13 at 22:50
    
Oh hah! It happens if you run it in a file but not from the IDLE REPL, of course. –  Claudiu Oct 9 '13 at 22:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+500

This is tested with CPython 2.7.3:

$ python myerr.py 
MyErr('bang!',) from ZeroDivisionError('integer division or modulo by zero',)
MyErr('nobang!',)

It works as long as the magic exception is directly created within the scope of an except clause. A little additional code can lift that restriction, though.

import sys
import opcode

SETUP_EXCEPT = opcode.opmap["SETUP_EXCEPT"]
SETUP_FINALLY = opcode.opmap["SETUP_FINALLY"]
END_FINALLY = opcode.opmap["END_FINALLY"]

def try_blocks(co):
    """Generate code positions for try/except/end-of-block."""
    stack = []
    code = co.co_code
    n = len(code)
    i = 0
    while i < n:
        op = ord(code[i])
        if op in (SETUP_EXCEPT, SETUP_FINALLY):
            stack.append((i, i + ord(code[i+1]) + ord(code[i+2])*256))
        elif op == END_FINALLY:
            yield stack.pop() + (i,)
        i += 3 if op >= opcode.HAVE_ARGUMENT else 1

class MyErr(Exception):
    """Magic exception."""

    def __init__(self, *args):
        callee = sys._getframe(1)
        try:
            in_except = any(i[1] <= callee.f_lasti < i[2] for i in try_blocks(callee.f_code))
        finally:
            callee = None

        Exception.__init__(self, *args)
        self.cause = sys.exc_info()[1] if in_except else None

    def __str__(self):
        return "%r from %r" % (self, self.cause) if self.cause else repr(self)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        try:
            1/0
        except:
            x = MyErr('bang!')
            raise x
    except Exception as exc:
        print exc

    try:
        raise MyErr('nobang!')
    except Exception as exc:
        print exc
    finally:
        pass

And remember, “Explicit is better than implicit,” so this would be way better if you ask me:

try:
    …
except Exception as exc:
    raise MyErr("msg", cause=exc)
share|improve this answer
    
This passes even the hardest testcases I could think of: Well done! pastebin.com/HHY7BVqx –  User Oct 11 '13 at 16:20
    
If used in production, memoizing try_blocks using a hash of code as the key would make a lot of sense. –  jhermann Oct 11 '13 at 20:10
    
props for actually implementing this! ended up being simpler than i thought it would be –  Claudiu Oct 14 '13 at 18:13
    
Thanks, works great! –  georg Oct 15 '13 at 9:01

The following approach might work, although it's a bit long-winded.

  • Get the code of the current frame from import inspect; inspect.currentframe().f_code
  • Inspect the bytecode (f_code.co_code), perhaps using dis.dis, to figure out whether the frame is being executed in an except block.
  • Depending on what you want to do, you might want to go back a frame and see if it wasn't called from an except block.

Ex:

def infoo():
    raise MyErr("from foo in except")

try:
    nope
except:
    infoo()
  • If none of the frames are in an except block then the sys.exc_info() is outdated.
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is what I've ended up doing. –  georg Oct 15 '13 at 8:59

One solution would be to call sys.exc_clear() after an exception has been handled:

import sys

class MyErr(Exception):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        Exception.__init__(self, *args)
        self.context = sys.exc_info()[1]
    def __str__(self):
        return repr(self.args) + ' from ' + repr(self.context)

try:
    print xxx
except Exception as e:
    # exception handled
    sys.exc_clear()

raise MyErr('look out')

Gives:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 18, in <module>
    raise MyErr('look out')`
__main__.MyErr: ('look out',) from None

If there is not many places that handle an exception without raising MyErr then it might be more suitable then modifying calls to MyErr providing some constructor argument, or even explicitly handling traceback preservation as in this answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but this is not an option. There are lots of excepts without raising MyError, some of them in external libraries. –  georg Oct 9 '13 at 22:36

I searched through the Python source to see if there was some indicator that was being set when the entering an except block that could be queried by going through the frame sequence from the custom exception's constructor.

I found this fblocktype enum that is stored in a fblockinfo struct :

enum fblocktype { LOOP, EXCEPT, FINALLY_TRY, FINALLY_END };

struct fblockinfo {
    enum fblocktype fb_type;
    basicblock *fb_block;
};

There is a comment above the fblocktype that describes a frame block :

A frame block is used to handle loops, try/except, and try/finally. It's called a frame block to distinguish it from a basic block in the compiler IR.

And then when you go up a bit there is a description of a basic block :

Each basicblock in a compilation unit is linked via b_list in the reverse order that the block are allocated. b_list points to the next block, not to be confused with b_next, which is next by control flow.

Also reading some more here about about the Control Flow Graphs :

A control flow graph (often referenced by its acronym, CFG) is a directed graph that models the flow of a program using basic blocks that contain the intermediate representation (abbreviated “IR”, and in this case is Python bytecode) within the blocks. Basic blocks themselves are a block of IR that has a single entry point but possibly multiple exit points. The single entry point is the key to basic blocks; it all has to do with jumps. An entry point is the target of something that changes control flow (such as a function call or a jump) while exit points are instructions that would change the flow of the program (such as jumps and ‘return’ statements). What this means is that a basic block is a chunk of code that starts at the entry point and runs to an exit point or the end of the block.

So all this seem to indicate that a frame block in Python's design is treated as a temporary object. It is not directly included in the Control Flow Graph except as part of the encompassing basic block's byte code, so it seems it can not be queried without parsing the frames byte code.

Further, I think the reason in your example the sys.exc_info is showing the exception from the try block is because it stores the last exception of the current basic block, frame blocks are not considered here.

sys.exc_info()

This function returns a tuple of three values that give information about the exception that is currently being handled. The information returned is specific both to the current thread and to the current stack frame. If the current stack frame is not handling an exception, the information is taken from the calling stack frame, or its caller, and so on until a stack frame is found that is handling an exception. Here, “handling an exception” is defined as “executing or having executed an except clause.” For any stack frame, only information about the most recently handled exception is accessible.

So when it says stack frame there I think it specifically means basic block and all the "handling an exception" talk means that exceptions in a frame block such as a try/except, for, and etc. bubble up to the basic block above.

share|improve this answer
    
Great research, very helpful, thanks! –  georg Oct 15 '13 at 8:58

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