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Does c# have an equivalent of the Java Runnable interface?

If not how could this be implemented or is it simply not needed?

thanks.

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Big thanks to everyone who answered this amazing response. –  DiggerMeUp Dec 17 '09 at 18:11
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7 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Nope. C# handles threads differently to Java. Rather than subclassing the Thread class, you simply create a new System.Threading.Thread object and pass it a ThreadStart delegate (this is the function where you do the work)..

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Side note: in Java, the Runnable interface is an alternative to subclassing Thread, but you still have to create a new Thread object, passing the Runnable to a constructor. –  Powerlord Dec 17 '09 at 18:06
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So basically, ThreadStart is the exact C# equivalent to Java's Runnable. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 17 '09 at 18:24
    
@Michel Borgwardt: Yeap, the answer is correct ( in essence ) but wrong in the way is it written. –  OscarRyz Dec 17 '09 at 18:41
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Does c# have an equivalent of the Java Runnable interface?

Yes, it's ThreadStart

class Runner
{
    void SomeMethod() 
    {
        Thread newThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(Run));
        newThread.Start(); 
    }

     public void Run() 
     {
          Console.WriteLine("Running in a different thread.")
     }
}

Would be equivalent to the following Java code

 class Runner implements Runnable {

     void someMethod() {
        Thread newThread = new Thread( this );
        newThread.start(); 
      }

      public void run() {
          out.println("Running in a different thread.");
      }
  }
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The ThreadStart delegate is essentially the same as the Runnable interface. A delegate is like an interface for a single method rather than an entire class, so it's actually easier to implement than the Runnable interface in Java.

MSDN explains about delegates:

Delegates and interfaces are similar in that they enable the separation of specification and implementation. Multiple independent authors can produce implementations that are compatible with an interface specification. Similarly, a delegate specifies the signature of a method, and authors can write methods that are compatible with the delegate specification. When should you use interfaces, and when should you use delegates?

Delegates are useful when:

  • A single method is being called.
  • A class may want to have multiple implementations of the method specification.
  • It is desirable to allow using a static method to implement the specification.
  • An event-like design pattern is desired (for more information, see the Events Tutorial).
  • The caller has no need to know or obtain the object that the method is defined on.
  • The provider of the implementation wants to "hand out" the implementation of the specification to only a few select components.
  • Easy composition is desired.

Interfaces are useful when:

  • The specification defines a set of related methods that will be called.
  • A class typically implements the specification only once.
  • The caller of the interface wants to cast to or from the interface type to obtain other interfaces or classes.
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It's not needed - threads in C# take an instance of a ThreadStart or ParameterizedThreadStart delegate which are the runnable components of the thread to execute.

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C# uses the ThreadStart delegate instead of Java's Runnable style.

public class Foo 
{

   public void DoStuff()
   {
      while (true)
      {
         // do some stuff
      }
   }
};

public class Bar
{
    public static int Main()
    {   
        Foo foo = new Foo();
        // create a ThreadStart delegate and pass in the method that will run 
        // (similar to run on Java's Runnable)
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(foo.DoStuff));
        thread.Start;
    }
}
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.Net uses the ThreadStart and ParameterizedThreadStart delegates to bootstrap Threads.

Delegates being first-class citizens in .Net, you can keep a reference around if you need to.

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The closest to a high level task-oriented threading API would be a BackgroundWorker. As others have mentioned, .NET (and thus C#) use delegates for representing a callable method. Java doesn't have that concept (function pointers), and instead uses interfaces for callable objects.

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