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In my MedicalProductController, I am trying to make my Create and Delete actions able to create and delete multiple objects on one page by passing IEnumerable<ViewModel> to the view. The approach I am using with my Create action worked with my Edit Action in this stack overflow question. But it is not working with my create action, so I suspect something isn't right.

The problem is that no fields appear on the page. The page simply says: "Create", "Save" (button), "Back to list" (a clickable link) on that page. In-between "Create" and "Save" there should be the html editor fields and labels created by MedicalProductViewModel.cshtml shown below.

Here is what my setup looks like.

Create.cshtml

@model IEnumerable<MvcMedicalStore.Models.MedicalProductViewModel>

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Create";
}

<h2>Create</h2>

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)

    <fieldset>
        <legend>MedicalProduct</legend>
        @Html.EditorFor(m => m)        
        <p>
            <input type="submit" value="Save" />
        </p>
    </fieldset>
}

<div>
    @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
</div>

@section Scripts {
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval")
}

Views\MedicalProduct\EditorTemplates\MedicalProductViewModel.cshtml

@model MvcMedicalStore.Models.MedicalProductViewModel

@Html.HiddenFor(item => Model.ID)


<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(item => Model.Name)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(item => Model.Name)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(item => Model.Name)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(item => Model.Price)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(item => Model.Price)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(item => Model.Price)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(item => Model.ID)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.DropDownListFor(item => Model.BrandID, Model.BrandSelectListItem)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(item => Model.BrandID)
</div>

MedicalProductController.cs

public class MedicalProductController : Controller
{
    private MvcMedicalStoreDb _db = new MvcMedicalStoreDb();

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var productList = _db.Products.ToArray();

        var viewModelList = GetMedicalProductViewModelList(productList);
        return View(viewModelList);
    }

    public IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> GetMedicalProductViewModelList(IEnumerable<MedicalProduct> productList)
    {
        var brandList = _db.Brands.ToArray();

        var mapper = new MedicalProductMapper();

        return mapper.MapMedicalProductViewModel(productList, brandList);            
    }
    public IEnumerable<MedicalProduct> GetMedicalProductList(IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> viewModelList)
    {
        var mapper = new MedicalProductMapper();

        return mapper.MapMedicalProductList(viewModelList);
    }

    //
    // GET: /MedicalSupply/Create

    public ActionResult Create()
    {
        return View();
    }

    //
    // POST: /MedicalSupply/Create

    [HttpPost]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    //public ActionResult Create(MedicalProduct medicalProduct)
    public ActionResult Create(IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> productViewModelList)
    {
        var productList = GetMedicalProductList(productViewModelList);

        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            foreach (MedicalProduct product in productList)
                _db.Products.Add(product);

            _db.SaveChanges();
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }

        return View(productViewModelList);
    }
}

MedicalProductMapper.cs

public class MedicalProductMapper
{

    public IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> MapMedicalProductViewModel(IEnumerable<MedicalProduct> productList, IEnumerable<Brand> brandList)
    {            
        var brandSelectListItem = brandList.Select(b => new SelectListItem()
                                                {
                                                    Text = b.Name,
                                                    Value = b.ID.ToString()
                                                });

        var viewModelList = productList.Select(p => new MedicalProductViewModel() 
                                {
                                    BrandID = p.BrandID,
                                    //BrandName = brandList.SingleOrDefault(b => b.ID == p.BrandID).Name,
                                    BrandSelectListItem = brandSelectListItem,
                                    ID = p.ID,
                                    Price = p.Price,
                                    Name = p.Name
                                });

        return viewModelList;
    }

    public IEnumerable<MedicalProduct> MapMedicalProductList(IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> viewModelList)
    {
        var modelList = viewModelList.ToArray().Select( viewModel => new MedicalProduct()
        {
            Name = viewModel.Name,
            Price = viewModel.Price,
            BrandID = viewModel.BrandID
        });

        return modelList;
    }
}

EDIT

My edit view is very similar to my create view:

EDIT.cshtml

@model IEnumerable<MvcMedicalStore.Models.MedicalProductViewModel>

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Edit";
}

<h2>Edit</h2>

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)

    <fieldset>
        <legend>MedicalProduct</legend>
        @Html.EditorFor(m => m)        
        <p>
            <input type="submit" value="Save" />
        </p>
    </fieldset>
}

<div>
    @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
</div>

@section Scripts {
    @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval")
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you have an IEnumerable instead of just one model? Is that so the user can add multiple records in one submission? –  McGarnagle Oct 7 '13 at 22:19
1  
@McGarnagle Yes, Also, it enables me to make less calls to the database, because more models can be processed inside a single function call, without needing to escape the function, and retrieve another model, and I can use the same code without having to make a new function that accepts a single MedicalProductViewModel. I was trying to make things simple. –  ArmorCode Oct 8 '13 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your Create() controller method is passing a null to your view, hence the editortemplate doesn't fire.

public ActionResult Create()
{
    return View();
}

If you pass in a new List<>, then it will work like your editor.

public ActionResult Create()
{
    return View(new List<MedicalProductViewModel>() { new MedicalProductViewModel() });
}

Is there a reason why you aren't just passing in a single viewmodel instead of a list? You will be able to use your editor template the same way.

Another thing to note is that it is probably not a good idea to pass in IEnumerable<> as your viewmodel. What if you need to pass other non-MedicalProduct properties to your view?

I would advocate a composite viewmodel instead, like so.

public class EditMedicalProductViewModel
{
    public IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel> MedicalProducts { get; set; }
}

public class CreateMedicalProductViewModel
{
    public MedicalProductViewModel MedicalProduct { get; set; }
}

In your edit view you'd do this instead

@Html.EditorFor(m => m.MedicalProducts)

And for your create view you'd do this

@Html.EditorFor(m=> m.MedicalProduct)   

In your create method you should create a new medical product

return View(new CreateMEdicalProductViewModel() { MedicalProduct = new MedicalProductViewModel() } );
share|improve this answer
    
I am going to try your answer. If I pass a single viewmodel, won't that only show one medicalProduct on the page? I'm trying to be consistent and I am still learning how this all works. –  ArmorCode Oct 7 '13 at 23:54
    
How do I pass in a new list? return View(new List<MedicalProductViewModel>())? –  ArmorCode Oct 7 '13 at 23:58
    
Please look at my updated answer on what you should do instead. –  Jun Wei Lee Oct 8 '13 at 0:03
    
I have also added the last bit on what to pass to the Create view too! –  Jun Wei Lee Oct 8 '13 at 0:05
    
To use your existing solution, use return View(new List<MedicalProductViewModel>() { new MedicalProductViewModel() }); –  Jun Wei Lee Oct 8 '13 at 0:08

It's not working because your model is a IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel>, but your editor template is for a MedicalProductViewModel

You could try this:

<fieldset>
    <legend>MedicalProduct</legend>
    @foreach(var item in Model)
    {
        Html.EditorFor(model => item)        
    }
    <p>
        <input type="submit" value="Save" />
    </p>
</fieldset>

But this will probably not format the fields quite the way you want, since it will create numerous editors. The easiest method would be to refactor your controller so that it allows editing one record at a time.

share|improve this answer
    
My edit view works great with MedicalProductViewModel.cshtml, and it is strongly typed to an IEnumerable<MedicalProductViewModel>. So I don't see why that would cause the EditorTemplate not to display. See my edit in the question to see the edit.cshtml –  ArmorCode Oct 7 '13 at 23:21
    
I tried changing the strongly typed MedicalProductViewModel to IEnumerable, and it made no difference, and the edit view generated a run time error. –  ArmorCode Oct 7 '13 at 23:37
    
There is no need to change the EditorTemplate type. EditorFor will enumerate the list and pass each item to your EditorTemplate. Check my answer and see if that works for you –  Jun Wei Lee Oct 7 '13 at 23:38

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