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I want to run the following search:

schema->resultset('Entity')->search({ 
        -or => { "me.user_id" => $user_id, 'set_to_user.user_id' => $user_id } 
    }, {
        'distinct' => 1,
        'join' => {'entity_to_set' => {'entity_set' => 'set_to_user'}},
        'order_by' => {'-desc' => 'modified'},
        'page' => 1,'rows' => 100
    });

On a database with tables as shown below.

CREATE TABLE entity (
  id varchar(500) NOT NULL,
  user_id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  modified timestamp NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id, user_id),
  FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES user(id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

CREATE TABLE entity_to_set (
  set_id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  user_id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  entity_id varchar(500) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (set_id, user_id, entity_id),
  FOREIGN KEY (entity_id, user_id) REFERENCES entity(id, user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  FOREIGN KEY (set_id) REFERENCES entity_set(id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

CREATE TABLE entity_set (
  id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

CREATE TABLE set_to_user (
  set_id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  user_id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (set_id, user_id),
  FOREIGN KEY (user_id) REFERENCES user(id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  FOREIGN KEY (set_id) REFERENCES entity_set(id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

CREATE TABLE user (
  id varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

I have around 6000 entity, 6000 entity_to_set, 10 entity_set, and 50 set_to_user.

Now, this query takes some time, (a second or two) which is unfortunate. When doing queries on just the entity table, including an ORDER BY, the result is almost instant. As a first step for debugging this, I found the actual SQL query that the DBIC code becomes:

SELECT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me
LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) 
LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id 
LEFT JOIN set_to_user set_to_user ON set_to_user.set_id = entity_set.id 
WHERE ( ( set_to_user.user_id = 'Craigy' OR me.user_id = 'Craigy' ) ) 
GROUP BY me.id, me.user_id, me.modified ORDER BY modified DESC LIMIT 100;

and here are the results of EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN

0|0|0|SCAN TABLE entity AS me USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_1 (~1000000 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING COVERING INDEX entity_to_set_idx_cover (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~9 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
0|3|3|SEARCH TABLE set_to_user AS set_to_user USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_set_to_user_1 (set_id=?) (~5 rows)
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR ORDER BY

where entity_to_set_idx_cover is

CREATE INDEX entity_to_set_idx_cover ON entity_to_set (entity_id, user_id, set_id);

Now, the issue is the b-tree being used for sorting, instead of an index which is used when I am not doing the joins.

I noticed that DBIx::Class converted 'distinct' => 1 into a GROUP BY statement (I believe the documentation says they are equivalent here). I removed the GROUP BY statement and used SELECT DISTINCT instead, with the following query

SELECT DISTINCT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me
LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) 
LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id 
LEFT JOIN set_to_user set_to_user ON set_to_user.set_id = entity_set.id 
WHERE ( ( set_to_user.user_id = 'Craigy' OR me.user_id = 'Craigy' ) ) 
ORDER BY modified DESC LIMIT 100;

which I believe gives the same result. The EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN for this query is

0|0|0|SCAN TABLE entity AS me USING COVERING INDEX entity_sort_modified_user_id (~1000000 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING COVERING INDEX entity_to_set_idx_cover (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~9 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
0|3|3|SEARCH TABLE set_to_user AS set_to_user USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_set_to_user_1 (set_id=?) (~5 rows)

where entity_sort_modified_user_id is an index created using

CREATE INDEX entity_sort_modified_user_id ON entity (modified, user_id, id);

This runs almost instantaneously (no b-tree).

EDIT: To demonstrate that the issue still occurs when the ORDER BY is in ascending order, and the effect that the index has on these queries, here is a similar query for the same tables. The first two queries are with no indexes using SELECT DISTINCT and GROUP BY respectively, and the second two are with the same queries and the index.

sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT DISTINCT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id WHERE ( me.user_id = 'Craigy' AND entity_set.id = 'SetID' ) ORDER BY modified LIMIT 100;
0|0|0|SCAN TABLE entity AS me (~100000 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING AUTOMATIC COVERING INDEX (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~7 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR DISTINCT
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR ORDER BY
sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id WHERE ( me.user_id = 'Craigy' AND entity_set.id = 'SetID' ) GROUP BY me.id, me.user_id, me.modified ORDER BY modified LIMIT 100;
0|0|0|SCAN TABLE entity AS me USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_1 (~100000 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING AUTOMATIC COVERING INDEX (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~7 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR ORDER BY
sqlite> CREATE INDEX entity_idx_user_id_modified_id ON entity (user_id, modified, id);
sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT DISTINCT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id WHERE ( me.user_id = 'Craigy' AND entity_set.id = 'SetID' ) ORDER BY modified LIMIT 100;
0|0|0|SEARCH TABLE entity AS me USING COVERING INDEX entity_idx_user_id_modified_id (user_id=?) (~10 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING AUTOMATIC COVERING INDEX (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~7 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id ) LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id WHERE ( me.user_id = 'Craigy' AND entity_set.id = 'SetID' ) GROUP BY me.id, me.user_id, me.modified ORDER BY modified LIMIT 100;
0|0|0|SEARCH TABLE entity AS me USING COVERING INDEX entity_idx_user_id_modified_id (user_id=?) (~10 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING AUTOMATIC COVERING INDEX (entity_id=? AND user_id=?) (~7 rows)
0|2|2|SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_entity_set_1 (id=?) (~1 rows)
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR GROUP BY
0|0|0|USE TEMP B-TREE FOR ORDER BY

My question is: how do I fix my DBIx::Class code so that it performs as well as the SELECT DISTINCT query. Or how do I add an index so that it works as well as-is? Or is some other kind of fix needed?

share|improve this question
    
I think that there is not much that could be done on the sqlite side: GROUP BY is processed in ascending order, but your ORDER BY is in descending order. Even when you create the indexes as DESC (possible in recent version of sqlite), you still get the temp b-tree. Notice that it disappears when you have ... GROUP BY me.modified, me.user_id, me.id ORDER BY me.modified, me.user_id, me.id ASC LIMIT 100 but not when you use DESC. So I'd say you have to address the topic on the SQL generation side. –  Fabian Oct 21 '13 at 11:48
    
(Discussed on the sqlite mailing list here) –  Fabian Oct 21 '13 at 11:49
    
@Fabian Thanks for the attention! I added an example using ascending ORDER BY which shows the same issue. It also shows the effect that the index has (it removes the B-TREE in the SELECT DISTINCT query and adds another B-TREE in the GROUP BY query). –  Craigy Oct 21 '13 at 15:48
    
The GROUP BY and ORDER BY clauses need to match, i.e., GROUP BY me.modified , me.user_id, me.id ORDER BY me.modified, me.user_id, me.id LIMIT 100; Then the additional b-tree disappears. –  Fabian Oct 21 '13 at 15:55
    
Ok you're right, but it still leaves USE TEMP B-TREE FOR GROUP BY. –  Craigy Oct 21 '13 at 15:59

1 Answer 1

Note: This is not a complete answer to this question. It only shows how to avoid the temp b-tree when sorting in ascending order. When sorting in descending order is required, there is AFAIK currently (version 3.8.1) no way (without tweaking sqlite) to avoid the temp b-tree for the GROUP BY version.

Using the table definitions and indexes from the question:

sqlite> select sqlite_version();
sqlite_version()
----------------
3.8.1

Your query runs without temp b-trees when (a) you ORDER BY in ascending order and (b) the GROUP BY clause matches the ORDER BY clause column by column.

Query unchanged except for the GROUP BY and ORDER BY clauses:

/* table definitions as shown in the question */
sqlite> CREATE INDEX entity_to_set_idx_cover ON entity_to_set (entity_id, user_id, set_id);
sqlite> CREATE INDEX entity_sort_modified_user_id ON entity (modified, user_id, id);

sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN
   ...> SELECT  me.id, me.user_id, me.modified FROM entity me
   ...> LEFT JOIN entity_to_set entity_to_set ON ( entity_to_set.entity_id = me.id AND entity_to_set.user_id = me.user_id )
   ...> LEFT JOIN entity_set entity_set ON entity_set.id = entity_to_set.set_id
   ...> LEFT JOIN set_to_user set_to_user ON set_to_user.set_id = entity_set.id
   ...> WHERE ( ( set_to_user.user_id = 'Craigy' OR me.user_id = 'Craigy' ) )
   ...> GROUP BY me.modified,  me.user_id, me.id
   ...> ORDER BY me.modified,  me.user_id, me.id ASC LIMIT 100;

selectid    order       from        detail
----------  ----------  ----------  -------------------------------------------------------------------------
0           0           0           SCAN TABLE entity AS me USING COVERING INDEX entity_sort_modified_user_id
0           1           1           SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING COVERING INDEX entity_t
0           2           2           SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoind
0           3           3           SEARCH TABLE set_to_user AS set_to_user USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoi

However, when you ORDER BY in descending order, you get an temp b-tree:

   ...> ...
   ...> GROUP BY me.modified,  me.user_id, me.id
   ...> ORDER BY me.modified,  me.user_id, me.id DESC LIMIT 100;
selectid    order       from        detail
----------  ----------  ----------  -------------------------------------------------------------------------
0           0           0           SCAN TABLE entity AS me USING COVERING INDEX entity_sort_modified_user_id
0           1           1           SEARCH TABLE entity_to_set AS entity_to_set USING COVERING INDEX entity_t
0           2           2           SEARCH TABLE entity_set AS entity_set USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoind
0           3           3           SEARCH TABLE set_to_user AS set_to_user USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoi
0           0           0           USE TEMP B-TREE FOR ORDER BY

The reason is that sqlite (up to the current version of 3.8.1) does not recognize that it could do the grouping in descending order. Hence you will always get the separate step. This cannot be avoided, even when the indexes are declared as DESC, too. See the discussion on the sqlite mailing list on this.

Conclusion If you want your query to ORDER BY DESC without a temp b-tree, you have to tweak your SQL generation to use DISTINCT.

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