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I have the following code (attempt) at clearing the 2nd column of data in my csv:

    def del_col(in_path):
    # read file into memory
        file_obj = open(in_path, 'rb')
        reader = csv.reader(file_obj, delimiter='\t')


# delete the status column here:



# Now write csv back to same file: 

        # write data to file
        file_obj = open(in_path, 'rb')
        writer = csv.writer(file_obj)
        writer.writerows(data)
        file_obj.close()

I'm not sure if or how to clear this column. Should I read down the data row-wise and clear the 2nd entry per each row? Or is there a more simplistic way to simply clear the 2nd column at once?

Here is a 2nd attempt:

def del_col(in_path):
    # read file into memory
    file_obj = open(in_path, 'rb')
    reader = csv.reader(file_obj, delimiter='\t')
    data = []
    for row in reader:

    # delete the status column here:

        vals = [x[:1] + x[2:] for x in reader]
        print vals
        file_obj.close()

    print 'Delete the 2nd Column (Lead Status?)'
    conf = raw_input('delete these leads? (Y|N): ').upper()[0]

    if conf == 'Y':
        # write data to file
        file_obj = open(in_path, 'wb')
        writer = csv.writer(file_obj)
        writer.writerows(data)
        file_obj.close()
share|improve this question
    
Use my code below and not the extra for row in reader loop. The vals = line is a one-line version of a for loop that works its way through each row in reader, so your for row line will mess things up. I edited my answer to use the name row instead of x to avoid confusion... – beroe Oct 9 '13 at 21:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would just read into a list while omitting the second column:

def del_col(in_path):
    # read file into memory
    file_obj = open(in_path, 'rb')
    readfile = csv.reader(file_obj, delimiter='\t')

    # delete the status column here:

    vals = [row[:1] + row[2:] for row in readfile]
    print vals
    file_obj.close()  # if you are going to use the same file name, close and re-open

    # Now write csv to new file: 
    # write data to file
    out_path = in_path + "_out.dat"
    out_obj = open(out_path, 'w')
    writefile = csv.writer(out_obj, delimiter='\t')
    writefile.writerows(vals)
    out_obj.close()

Other thoughts: Don't write to the same file that you are reading from. (In this case, I generated a new name based on the old name.) You needed to open the destination file with 'w' instead of 'r' and also add the delimiter to the csv.writer()...

share|improve this answer
    
Can you take a look at my above edited code? I utilized you middle code section with the layout I've been using in other function, but can't get it to run. – gigawatts Oct 9 '13 at 17:09
    
I'm getting indentation errors on the for loop line – gigawatts Oct 9 '13 at 17:10
    
Sorry 'bout that. Are you using tabs or spaces in your editor? There might have been some mixture of white-space formatting in there. Try copying again (I edited), or delete all the leading white space around those lines that are generating the error and re-insert them, or Show Invisibles in your editor and make sure it is consistent. – beroe Oct 9 '13 at 18:01
    
Hmmm... I didn't get an error but the 2nd column is still there. would vals = [x[:0] for x in reader work if I only want to preserve the 1st column? – gigawatts Oct 9 '13 at 21:47
    
Make sure that you also changed the writer.writerows(vals) line. I changed it (to vals) to print the new variable instead of the one in your original code. – beroe Oct 9 '13 at 21:49

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