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I am debugging a program that fails during a low memory situation and would like a C++ program that just consumes LOT of memory. Any pointers would help!

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15  
"Any pointers would help!" - That's funny considering the question –  Keats Dec 17 '09 at 18:30
12  
0x3A28213A 0x6339392C 0x7363682E –  Gus Dec 17 '09 at 18:31
3  
+1 for unintentional humor –  yankee2905 Dec 17 '09 at 18:33
2  
Confucius say: The question is the answer –  T.E.D. Dec 17 '09 at 18:44
2  

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Allcoating big blocks is not going to work.

  • Depending on the OS you are not limited to the actual physical memory and unused large chunks could be potentially just swap out to the disk.
  • Also this makes it very hard to get your memory to fail exactly when you want it to fail.

What you need to do is write your own version of new/delete that fail on command.

Somthing like this:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>



int memoryAllocFail = false;

void* operator new(std::size_t size)
{
    std::cout << "New Called\n";
    if (memoryAllocFail)
    {   throw std::bad_alloc();
    }

    return ::malloc(size);
}

void operator delete(void* block)
{
    ::free(block);
}

int main()
{
    std::auto_ptr<int>  data1(new int(5));

    memoryAllocFail = true;
    try
    {
        std::auto_ptr<int>  data2(new int(5));
    }
    catch(std::exception const& e)
    {
        std::cout << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }
}
> g++ mem.cpp
> ./a.exe
New Called
New Called
Exception: St9bad_alloc
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1  
It is possible that simply linking a replacement version of malloc() that returns null on demand will give better coverage (or perhaps both just in case the built-in new does not use malloc() ) so that if any code uses malloc() will fail at the same time and so that if new(nothrow) is used it will still fail. –  Clifford Dec 17 '09 at 20:45
    
It is not a requirement of new/delete to use malloc/free. So you will need to check your implementation documentation to see how it works under the hood. See stackoverflow.com/questions/240212/… for more details –  Loki Astari Dec 17 '09 at 21:06
    
Linking in a new lib with special version of malloc/free can be problomatic but it is not impossable. But technically the standard does not support such behavior (though comercial tools do exactly that (But they have dev teams working on the problem)). –  Loki Astari Dec 17 '09 at 21:08
    
Is there a process to tell Visual Studio, Windows, GCC or Linux to restrict the executables memory environment? For example, we have an emulator for an embedded system which has limited memory, say 640MB. We want to have the emulator use the same memory restrictions (because debugging is easier with the emultor). –  Thomas Matthews Dec 17 '09 at 22:19
    
Yes, Thomas. See the duplicate links I gave in this question's comments. Or see the answers here about AppVerifier and ulimit. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 17 '09 at 22:52

A similar question was asked here and htis was my response. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1229241/how-do-i-force-a-program-to-appear-to-run-out-of-memory/1229277#1229277

On Linux the command ulimit is probably what you want.

You'll probably want to use ulimit -v to limit the amount of virtual memory available to your app.

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If you're using Unix or Linux, I'd suggest using ulimit:

bash$ ulimit -a
core file size        (blocks, -c) unlimited
data seg size         (kbytes, -d) unlimited
...
stack size            (kbytes, -s) 10240
...
virtual memory        (kbytes, -v) unlimited
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Just write a c++ app that creates a giant array

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1  
You may need to disable the virtual memory manager (limit the OS to only using physical RAM). You could even go so far as to remove some RAM from your system, to speed up the point at which you're low on ram. –  Mordachai Dec 17 '09 at 18:39
    
The trouble here it becomes difficult to write tests that fail consistently in any environment. –  Loki Astari Dec 17 '09 at 19:37

Are you on the Windows platform (looking at the username...perhaps not :) ) If you are in Windows land, AppVerifier has a low memory simulation mode. See the Low Resource Simulation test.

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+1 I've not used AppVerifier itself, but something like this is a much better idea. You don't want everything on your system to suffer (like your debugger!) in your low member situation. –  luke Dec 17 '09 at 18:36

I know it's a leak, but pointers will help :)

int main()
{
    for(;;)
    {
        char *p = new char[1024*1024];
    }
    // optimistic return :)
    return 0;
}
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Allocating huge chunks will eventually fail. But does not help in making it fail in a controlled way. Also the OS will swap out pages to disk as it is not limited by physical RAM limits. –  Loki Astari Dec 17 '09 at 19:38

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