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I have a numerical method that could return nan or inf if there was an error, and for testing purposed I'd like to temporarily force it to return nan or inf to ensure the situation is being handled correctly. Is there a reliable, compiler-independent way to create values of nan and inf in C?

After googling for about 10 minutes I've only been able to find complier dependent solutions.

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floats are not defined by the C standard. So there is no compiler-independent way of doing what you want. –  Johan Kotlinski Dec 17 '09 at 19:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 36 down vote accepted

You can test if your implementation has it:

#include <math.h>
#ifdef NAN
/* NAN is supported */
#endif
#ifdef INFINITY
/* INFINITY is supported */
#endif

The existence of INFINITY is guaranteed by C99 (or the latest draft at least), and "expands to a constant expression of type float representing positive or unsigned infinity, if available; else to a positive constant of type float that overflows at translation time."

NAN may or may not be defined, and "is defined if and only if the implementation supports quiet NaNs for the float type. It expands to a constant expression of type float representing a quiet NaN."

Note that if you're comparing floating point values, and do:

a = NAN;

even then,

a == NAN;

is false. One way to check for NaN would be:

#include <math.h>
if (isnan(a)) { ... }

You can also do: a != a to test if a is NaN.

There is also isfinite(), isinf(), isnormal(), and signbit() macros in math.h in C99.

C99 also has nan functions:

#include <math.h>
double nan(const char *tagp);
float nanf(const char *tagp);
long double nanl(ocnst char *tagp);

(Reference: n1256).

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2  
Excellent answer. Reference for the NAN and INFINITY macros is C99 §7.12 paragraphs 4 and 5. Besides (isnan(a)) you can also check for NaN using (a != a) on a conforming implementation of C. –  Stephen Canon Dec 17 '09 at 20:29
    
Thanks Stephen, updated. –  Alok Singhal Dec 17 '09 at 21:29
8  
For the love of readability, a != a should NEVER be used. –  Chris Kerekes Sep 20 '12 at 13:37

There is no compiler independent way of doing this, as neither the C (nor the C++) standards say that the floating point math types must support NAN or INF.

Edit: I just checked the wording of the C++ standard, and it says that these functions (members of the templated class numeric_limits):

quiet_NaN() 
signalling_NaN()

wiill return NAN representations "if available". It doesn't expand on what "if available" means, but presumably something like "if the implementation's FP rep supports them". Similarly, there is a function:

infinity()

which returns a positive INF rep "if available".

These are both defined in the <limits> header - I would guess that the C standard has something similar (probably also "if available") but I don't have a copy of the current C99 standard.

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That's disappointing and surprising. Don't C and C++ conform to the IEEE floating point numbers, which have a standard representation for nan and inf? –  Graphics Noob Dec 17 '09 at 19:05
15  
C doesn't mandate IEEE floating-point representations. –  Steve Emmerson Dec 17 '09 at 19:21
12  
In C99, the C header <math.h> defines nan(), nanf(), and nanl() that return different representations of NaN (as a double, float, and int respectively), and infinity (if avaliable) could be returned by generating one with log(0) or something. There's no standard way to check for them, even in C99. The <float.h> header (<limits.h> is for integral types) is unfortunately silent about inf and nan values. –  Chris Lutz Dec 17 '09 at 19:47
    
Wow, that's a big mixup. nanl() returns a long double, not an int like my comment says. I don't know why I didn't realize that when I was typing it. –  Chris Lutz Dec 17 '09 at 19:53
2  
@IngeHenriksen - Pretty sure Microsoft has stated that it has no intention of VC++ supporting C99. –  Chris Lutz Mar 25 '13 at 3:48

A compiler independent way, but not processor independent way to get these:

int inf = 0x7F800000;
return *(float*)&inf;

int nan = 0x7F800001;
return *(float*)&nan;

This should work on any processor which uses the IEEE 754 floating point format (which x86 does).

UPDATE: Tested and updated.

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This is, unfortunately, won't port between 32/64 bit computers. Preprocessor conditionals for platform would be needed This is a bit hacky, but is better than no solution, of course. –  McPherrinM Dec 17 '09 at 19:13
1  
@WaffleMatt - why wouldn't this port between 32/64 bit? IEEE 754 single-precision float is 32-bit regardless of the addressing size of the underlying processor. –  Aaron Dec 17 '09 at 19:20
4  
Casting to (float &) ? That doesn't look like C to me. You need int i = 0x7F800000; return *(float *)&i; –  Chris Lutz Dec 17 '09 at 19:22
    
@Chris Lutz - yes, I just noticed that too (fixed). –  Aaron Dec 17 '09 at 19:23
3  
Note that 0x7f800001 is a so-called signaling NaN in the IEEE-754 standard. Although most libraries and hardware don't support signaling NaNs, it is likely better to return a quiet NaN like 0x7fc00000. –  Stephen Canon Dec 17 '09 at 22:15

This functions in both float and double:

double NAN = 0.0/0.0

double POS_INF = 1.0 /0.0

double NEG_INF = -1.0/0.0;

Edit: As someone already said, the old IEEE standard said that such values should raise traps. But the new compilers almost always switch the traps off and return the given values because trapping interferes with error handling.

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Trapping was one option for error handling allowed under 754-1985. The behavior used by most modern hardware/compilers was also allowed (and was the preferred behavior for many of the members of the committee). Many implementers incorrectly assumed that trapping was required due to the unfortunate use of the term "exceptions" in the standard. This has been greatly clarified in the revised 754-2008. –  Stephen Canon Dec 17 '09 at 22:39
    
Hi, Stephen, you're right, but the standard also says: "A user should be able to request a trap on any of the five exceptions by specifying a handler for it. He should be able to request that an existing handler be disabled, saved, or restored. He should also be able to determine whether a specific trap handler for a designated exception has been enabled." "should" as defined (2. Definitions) means "strongly recommended" and its implementation should only be left out if the architecture etc. makes it impractical. 80x86 fully supports the standard, so there's no reason for C not to support it. –  Thorsten S. Dec 18 '09 at 12:14
    
I agree that C should require 754 (2008) floating point, but there are good reasons for it not to; specifically, C is used in all kinds of environments that other than x86 -- including embedded devices that don't have hardware floating-point, and signal processing devices where programmers don't even want to use floating point. Rightly or wrongly, those uses account for a lot of inertia in the language spec. –  Stephen Canon Dec 19 '09 at 1:05
    
I don't know why the top answer made it up there. It doesn't give any way to produce the requested values. This answer does. –  drysdam Oct 14 '14 at 18:39
double a_nan = strtod("NaN", NULL);
double a_inf = strtod("Inf", NULL);
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1  
This is a smart portable solution! C99 requires strtod and does convert NaN's and Inf's. –  ulidtko Jan 6 at 10:24
<inf.h>

/* IEEE positive infinity.  */

#if __GNUC_PREREQ(3,3)
# define INFINITY   (__builtin_inff())
#else
# define INFINITY   HUGE_VALF
#endif

and

<bits/nan.h>
#ifndef _MATH_H
# error "Never use <bits/nan.h> directly; include <math.h> instead."
#endif


/* IEEE Not A Number.  */

#if __GNUC_PREREQ(3,3)

# define NAN    (__builtin_nanf (""))

#elif defined __GNUC__

# define NAN \
  (__extension__                                  \
   ((union { unsigned __l __attribute__ ((__mode__ (__SI__))); float __d; })  \
    { __l: 0x7fc00000UL }).__d)

#else

# include <endian.h>

# if __BYTE_ORDER == __BIG_ENDIAN
#  define __nan_bytes       { 0x7f, 0xc0, 0, 0 }
# endif
# if __BYTE_ORDER == __LITTLE_ENDIAN
#  define __nan_bytes       { 0, 0, 0xc0, 0x7f }
# endif

static union { unsigned char __c[4]; float __d; } __nan_union
    __attribute_used__ = { __nan_bytes };
# define NAN    (__nan_union.__d)

#endif  /* GCC.  */
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I'm also surprised these aren't compile time constants. But I suppose you could create these values easily enough by simply executing an instruction that returns such an invalid result. Dividing by 0, log of 0, tan of 90, that kinda thing.

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I usually use

#define INFINITY (1e999)

or

const double INFINITY = 1e999

which works at least in IEEE 754 contexts because the highest representable double value is roughly 1e308. 1e309 would work just as well, as would 1e99999, but three nines is sufficient and memorable. Since this is either a double literal (in the #define case) or an actual Inf value, it will remain infinite even if you're using 128-bit (“long double”) floats.

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This is very dangerous, in my opinion. Imagine how someone migrates your code to 128 bit floats in 20 or so years (after your code goes through an unbelievably complex evolution, none of the stages of which you were able to predict today). Suddenly, the exponent range drastically increases, and all your 1e999 literals no longer round to +Infinity. Per Murphy's laws, this breaks an algorithm. Worse: a human programmer doing the "128-bit" build will not likely spot that error in advance. I.e. most likely it will be too late when this error is found and recognized. Very dangerous. –  ulidtko Jan 6 at 10:51
    
Of course, the worst case scenario above might be far from realistic. But still, consider the alternatives! It's better to stay on the safe side. –  ulidtko Jan 6 at 10:53

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