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So, moving from Linked List, I now have to build a Linked Stack, which I think is pretty much similar to it. However, I get an access error, saying that cannot access to private member. I know it has to do with the constructor inside the unique pointer, where you cannot copy the pointer. One of the guy has told me to do a deep-copy of the constructor, but I don't know how. Would anyone please show me how to do it ? Thank you.

PS: I know that this one has been posted by me earlier today. But I'm not having the answer to myself yet and it seems like nobody is around to answer me either, so I decide to repost it . If you think this is a repost, feel free to delete it.

LinkNode.h

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class LinkedNode 
{

    public:
            // This is giving me error and I do not know how to recreate
            // or deep-copy the constructor
        LinkedNode(T newElement, unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext)
        {
                element = newElement;
                next = newNext  
        }

        T GetElement() {return element;}

        void SetElement(T x) {element = x;}

        unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext() {return next;}

        void SetNext(unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext) {next = newNext;}

    private:
        T element;
        unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> next;
};

CompactStack.h

#pragma once
#include"LinkedNode.h"

using namespace std;

template <class T>
class CompactStack 
{

    public:

        CompactStack() {}
        bool IsEmpty() const { return head == 0; }

        T Peek() 
        {
            assert(!IsEmpty());
            return head-> GetElement();
        }

        void Push(T x) 
        {
            unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newhead(new LinkedNode<T>(x, head));
            head.swap(newhead);
        }

        void Pop() 
        {
            assert(!IsEmpty());
            unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> oldhead = head;
            head = head->next();
        }

        void Clear() 
        {
            while (!IsEmpty())
            Pop();
        }

    private:
        unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> head;
};

This is the error that I've got from the compiler

Error   1   error C2248: 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr' : cannot access private member declared in class 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>' e:\fall 2013\cpsc 131\hw4\hw4\hw4\compactstack.h    23
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

unique_ptr must use move to transfer from one unique_ptr to another. Below I've added all the moves needed to compile. Note that after a move, the original object is in a valid but unknown state. This is important in the Pop() method.

It is also bad practice to put using namespace in a header, so they have been removed.

LinkedNode.h

#pragma once
#include <memory>

template <class T>
class LinkedNode
{
public:
    LinkedNode(T newElement, std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext)
    {
        element = newElement;
        next = move(newNext);
    }
    T GetElement() {return element;}
    void SetElement(T x) {element = x;}
    std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext() {return move(next);}
    void SetNext(std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newNext) {next = move(newNext);}

private:
    T element;
    std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> next;
};

CompactStack.h

#pragma once
#include <cassert>
#include"LinkedNode.h"

template <class T>
class CompactStack
{
public:
    CompactStack() {}
    bool IsEmpty() const { return head == nullptr; }
    T Peek()
    {
        assert(!IsEmpty());
        return head-> GetElement();
    }
    void Push(T x)
    {
        std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> newhead(new LinkedNode<T>(x, move(head)));
        head.swap(newhead);
    }
    void Pop()
    {
        assert(!IsEmpty());
        std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> oldhead = move(head);
        head = oldhead->newNext(); // head no longer valid after move, use oldhead
        // oldhead->next no longer valid, but local variable going out of scope anyway.
    }
    void Clear()
    {
        while(!IsEmpty())
            Pop();
    }
private:
    std::unique_ptr<LinkedNode<T>> head;
};

The above works with simple test:

#include <iostream>
#include "CompactStack.h"
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    CompactStack<int> cs;
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
    cs.Push(1);
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
    cout << "Peek " << cs.Peek() << endl;
    cs.Push(2);
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
    cout << "Peek " << cs.Peek() << endl;
    cs.Push(3);
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
    cout << "Peek " << cs.Peek() << endl;
    cs.Pop();
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
    cout << "Peek " << cs.Peek() << endl;
    cs.Clear();
    cout << "IsEmpty " << cs.IsEmpty() << endl;
}

Output

IsEmpty 1
IsEmpty 0
Peek 1
IsEmpty 0
Peek 2
IsEmpty 0
Peek 3
IsEmpty 0
Peek 2
IsEmpty 1
share|improve this answer
    
awesome work ! Thanks a lot Mark Tolonen –  Hoang Minh Oct 8 '13 at 5:07
    
just a quick question. Since we do not have any variable to keep track of the number of elements that we put in the stack, (apparently the stack would never be overflow anyway) is there anyway that we can tell how many elements that we have at a certain times ? –  Hoang Minh Oct 8 '13 at 5:16
1  
Sure, add a method while head not nullptr, ++count and advance to head->next. You'll need to add a method to read next without destroying the one in the LinkedNode. The current newNext() won't work. –  Mark Tolonen Oct 8 '13 at 6:15

You have another error beside the one you listed.

LinkNode::next is private. You can't access a private member directly from outside the class (or a friend function). Use setNext.

share|improve this answer
    
This is incorrect. The private access is due to std::unique_ptr's copy ctor being private in MSVC's implementation. std::unique_ptr is move only and cannot be copied. –  Jesse Good Oct 8 '13 at 3:48
    
@JesseGood: any idea how to do the move semantic ? –  Hoang Minh Oct 8 '13 at 3:53
    
@HoangMinh: The quick fix would be next = std::move(newNext);, but it looks like you need a redesign. –  Jesse Good Oct 8 '13 at 3:59
    
@JesseGood: Thanks, but it won't fix it, it still gives me the same error :( –  Hoang Minh Oct 8 '13 at 4:02

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