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I keep getting error messages from the compiler saying that there is a memory leak, two 8-byte blocks and one 5-byte block. I have already deleted the *name array in the destructor. How does the destructor handle scope? I was under the impression that once the main ended that the fruit objects would be deleted as they went out of scope.

#include "Fruit.h"
#include "LeakWatcher.h"

using namespace std;
Fruit::Fruit(const Fruit &temp )
{
    name = temp.name;
    for(int i = 0; i < CODE_LEN - 1; i++)
    {
        code[i] = temp.code[i];
    }
}
void  Fruit::operator=(const Fruit &tempFruit)
{
    name = tempFruit.name;
    for(int i = 0; i < CODE_LEN; i++)
    {
        code[i] = tempFruit.code[i];
    }

}
Fruit::~Fruit()
{
    delete[] name;

}
bool  Fruit::operator==(const Fruit &tempFruit)
{
    int i = 0;
    while(name[i] != NULL && tempFruit.name[i] != NULL)  
    {
        if(name[i] != tempFruit.name[i])
            return false;
        i++;
    }
    if(name[i] != NULL || tempFruit.name[i] != NULL)
        return false;
    return true;
}
bool  Fruit::operator<(const Fruit &tempFruit)
{
    int i = 0;
    while(name[i] != NULL && tempFruit.name[i] != NULL)  
    {
        if((int)name[i] < (int)tempFruit.name[i])
            return true;
        else if((int)name[i] > (int)tempFruit.name[i])
            return false;
        i++;
    }
    if(name[i] == NULL && tempFruit.name[i] != NULL)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}
std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &os, const Fruit *printFruit)
{
    os << setiosflags(ios::left) << setw(MAX_NAME_LEN) << printFruit->name << " ";
    for(int i = 0; i < CODE_LEN; i++)
    {
        os << printFruit->code[i];
    }
    os << endl;
    return os;
}

std::istream & operator>>(std::istream &is, Fruit *readFruit)
{

    string tempString;
    is >> tempString;
    int size = tempString.length();
    readFruit->name = new char[tempString.length()];
    for(int i = 0; i <= (int)tempString.length(); i++)
    {
        readFruit->name[i] = tempString[i];
    }
    readFruit->name[(int)tempString.length()] = '\0';
    for(int i =0; i < CODE_LEN; i++)
    {
        is >> readFruit->code[i];
    }
    return is;
}
void stuff()
{

}
void main()
{
    _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_WARN, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE ); 
   _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_WARN, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDOUT ); 
   _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_ERROR, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE ); 
   _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_ERROR, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDOUT ); 
   _CrtSetReportMode( _CRT_ASSERT, _CRTDBG_MODE_FILE ); 
   _CrtSetReportFile( _CRT_ASSERT, _CRTDBG_FILE_STDOUT );
    Fruit *fruit = new Fruit();
    Fruit *fruit1 = new Fruit();
    cin >> fruit;
    *fruit1 = *fruit;
    cout << fruit << fruit1;
    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();

}

H

#ifndef _FRUIT_H
#define _FRUIT_H
#include <cstring>
#include <sstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
enum { CODE_LEN = 4 }; 
enum { MAX_NAME_LEN = 30 };
class Fruit
{
private:
    char *name;
    char code[CODE_LEN];
public:
    Fruit(const Fruit &temp);
    Fruit(){name = NULL;};
    bool operator<(const Fruit &other);
   friend std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &os, const Fruit *printFruit);
    bool operator==(const Fruit &other);
   bool operator!=(const Fruit &other){return!(*this==other);};
    friend std::istream & operator>>(std::istream& is, Fruit *readFruit);
    void  Fruit::operator=(const Fruit &tempFruit);
    ~Fruit();
};
#endif
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2  
Perhaps you need to delete fruit and fruit1? Also, note that you are assigning fruit to fruit1, which means you'll never be able to free the second object. –  Sayem Ahmed Oct 8 '13 at 5:18
5  
Simple: stop using new everywhere. If you insist on using it, then follow the rule of three, and don't forget to delete everything you new. At the moment, it doesn't look like Fruit is safely copyable or assignable. –  juanchopanza Oct 8 '13 at 5:18
2  
You are checking for memory leaks before the variables go out of scope. Of course there will be leaks shown. But then again you're not using delete either. –  Mark Ransom Oct 8 '13 at 5:19
1  
@CraigPatrickLafferty: You have what is called a double delete, you are calling delete on the same memory twice in your destructor. –  Jesse Good Oct 8 '13 at 5:28
1  
Your code would be much simpler and less error prone if you used std::string instead of char*. –  Marius Bancila Oct 8 '13 at 5:29
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It appears that the primary source of your "leak" is the "fruit" and "fruit1" pointer - _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks() checks for memory that hasn't been freed. You need to delete the data these two point to before you call it.

That said, you have other issues.

C++ does not have automatic garbage collection. You must either track and manage your memory allocations or use classes/code that does it for you.

Consider the following code:

void iNeedALeak() {
    void* p = new char[64];
    strcpy(p, "Hello world");
    std::cout << p << std::endl;
}

This code made an allocation, and stored it in "p". Even though we used the value for a couple of functions, we never stored it. And so, it is never returned to the system.

One example of a leak waiting to happen in your code is in operator>>

std::istream & operator>>(std::istream &is, Fruit *readFruit)
{
    string tempString;
    is >> tempString;
    int size = tempString.length();
    readFruit->name = new char[tempString.length()];

Yes, in your delete operator, you delete[] from name. But that only handles the case where your code reaches ~Fruit, consider:

Fruit f;
cin >> f; // readFruit->name = new char[]..
cin >> f; // readFruit->name = new char[]...

At this point, you're no-longer storing the original value, and you didn't delete it.

Really the problem you're having is that you're using a very C-like approach. If you plan to write this in C++ you should consider using RAII, for example you could use the std::unique_ptr class.

TL;DR Don't expose raw pointers, encapsulate them behind something that ensures they get freed when they go out of scope or when they are reassigned to.

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Your fruit objects will not be deleted when they go out of scope. Instead, they will leak. Since this is the last thing your program does, there's no real consequence and the OS will reclaim the memory once the program exits. Nonetheless, it's a leak.

Why not just create them on the stack instead?

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Rather than addressing the specific memory issues in your example, which I have already done in comments, I would avoid them entirely by using std::string and std::array. Your code would boil down to

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <array>
enum { CODE_LEN = 4 }; 
class Fruit
{
private:
    std::string name;
    std::array<char,CODE_LEN> code;
public:
   bool operator<(const Fruit &other);
   bool operator==(const Fruit& other);
   bool operator!=(const Fruit& other) {return!(*this==other);}
   friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &os, const Fruit& f);
   friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, Fruit& f);
};

Note no user defined constructors, assignment operator or destructor. Some of the operators could be greatly simplified too, e.g.

bool Fruit::operator==(const Fruit& rhs)
{
  return code == rhs.code;
}

bool Fruit::operator<(const Fruit& rhs)
{
  return name < rhs.name;
}
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