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I'm in needed of a thread worker in my .NET application - .NET has several classes such as thread pools etc., but I can't find anything that runs on a single thread, which is a requirement in my case.

So I've had a go a writing one myself, but these things are notoriously tricky, I'm sure I've got something wrong. Can anyone improve it or point me in the direction of somthing similar that's already been written?

public class ThreadWorker : IDisposable
{
    public ThreadWorker()
    {
        m_Thread = new Thread(ThreadMain);
        m_Thread.IsBackground = true;
        m_Thread.Name = "Worker Thread";
        m_Thread.Start();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!m_Terminate)
        {
            m_Terminate = true;
            m_Event.Set();
            m_Thread.Join();
        }
    }

    public void QueueUserWorkItem(Action<object> callback, object data)
    {
        lock (m_Queue) m_Queue.Enqueue(new WorkItem(callback, data));
        m_Event.Set();
    }

    void ThreadMain()
    {
        while (!m_Terminate)
        {
            if (m_Queue.Count > 0)
            {
                WorkItem workItem;
                lock (m_Queue) workItem = m_Queue.Dequeue();
                workItem.Callback(workItem.Data);
            }
            else
            {
                m_Event.WaitOne();
            }
        }
    }

    class WorkItem
    {
        public WorkItem(Action<object> callback, object data)
        {
            Callback = callback;
            Data = data;
        }

        public Action<object> Callback;
        public object Data;
    }

    AutoResetEvent m_Event = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    Queue<WorkItem> m_Queue = new Queue<WorkItem>();
    Thread m_Thread;
    bool m_Terminate;
}

C'mon, Tear it apart!

PLEASE STOP ASKING WHETHER I NEED THIS: Yes I do - I have legacy C code that isn't thread-safe, so I need to synchronise all of my calls to it on a background thread.

EDIT: Last minute change to my code was obviously incorrect ,fixed it.

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4  
?? why would you want a threadpool, that is stuck on one thread? –  Joel Martinez Dec 17 '09 at 20:08
1  
Why not just use a Queue of BackgroundWorker instances, and start each one as soon as the previous one is done? –  Kyralessa Dec 17 '09 at 20:12
5  
A "Threadpool that runs on a single thread" isn't a thread pool. It's a work queue. Consider the windows message queue as an example. This really feels like reinventing the wheel. –  Greg D Dec 17 '09 at 20:20
2  
@Groky: The windows message queue. –  Greg D Dec 17 '09 at 20:23
3  
@Rageporto: from the msdn docs: " Background threads are identical to foreground threads, except that background threads do not prevent a process from terminating". That is what I want. Are there other side effects? –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:56
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm going to ignore the question of whether or not you should be doing this and just give you feedback about your code. Most are style issues or suggestions to use best practices, but others are bugs that need to be fixed.

  1. Don't use Hungarian notation (m_*). It's not necessary.
  2. You need to lock when accessing m_Terminate. Or at the very least it needs to be volatile.
  3. Why are you using Action<object> and then passing null as a parameter? Can't you just use ThreadStart if you don't want a parameter? Fixed
  4. WorkItem should be immutable. Use readonly members or a property with a private setter.
  5. Missing error handling. If one of your work item actions throws an exception it will stop your entire thread pool working (assuming it doesn't take your entire application down).
  6. I have to agree with Greg's comment. This isn't a thread pool. It's a work queue. The name of the class should reflect that.
  7. You should validate that the parameter callback to QueueUserWorkItem is not null to avoid NullReferenceException in the loop in ThreadMain (fail fast).
  8. You should throw an ObjectDisposedException if QueueUserWorkItem is called after Dispose has already been called.
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3  
m_* isn't hungarian notation. I've seen various people use _* and this.* to reference fields. You need some sort of prefix, what you use is a matter of style. –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:21
    
That was supposed to read "underscore" and this. –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:22
    
I agree with WorkItem being immutable. I don't think properties is really a must in a private nested data-holder class (even though I use them). Anyway +1 for helping instead of "Don't reinvent the wheel". –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:24
3  
@Groky I don't use any prefix. It is a matter of style, but there's absolutely no need for a prefix. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:25
1  
@Groky: because of weird optimization stuff, you can be reading stale values, i.e. the thread may never see the change in m_terminate. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:28
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I assume you want this because you don't want any of those 'jobs' to run at the same time, that looks like a valid requirement. But it is slightly different from 'all on the same single thread'.

The (Fx4) Task parallel library has a 'ContinuesWith' construction that solves a similar problem but with a different interface.

So I think you have to (continue to) roll your own. Some criticism:

You check for m_Queue.Count outside a lock, that is probably safe because you only have 1 consumer but I would fold it into the lock.

Also you could replace the AutoResetEvent with Monitor.Wait() and Monitor.Pulse(). This is 'lighter' (all managed code) and it plays nice with lock (== Monitor.Enter/.Exit).

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Thank you Henk. You are the only person who has understood my requirements, and useful advice! –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:31
    
There is a producer-consumer queue in the TPL that can be used for this as well. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:35
    
Sorry, it's not exactly in the TPL, it's the ParallelFX which is a superset of the TPL. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:37
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I'll assume that you actually have a good reason for wanting a thread pool that only has one thread. In that case, I only spot one major flaw: Why are you using Action<T> when you are always passing null? Just use Action, which takes no arguments.

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I've fixed that - a last minute change to my code that I didn't spot. –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:17
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Its in one of the comments, but the BackgroundWorker, is essentially a good implementation of what you want. Though you could start several of them, in your case just start one.

Secondarily, you actually can use ThreadPool for this, by changing your strategy:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(myWorkerProcess);

Then:

void myWorkerProcess(object state) {
   WorkItem workItem;

   while (!m_Terminate) {
      m_Event.WaitOne(5000);
      if (m_Queue.Count > 0) {
         lock (m_Queue) workItem = m_Queue.Dequeue();
         // ... do your single threaded operation here ...
      }
   }
}

In this way you only ever have one background thread and it just loops waiting for you to do your thing.

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1  
BackgroundWorker requires the Windows message loop so it's only useful in Windows Forms projects. It's not necessarily going to help the OP. –  Mark Byers Dec 17 '09 at 20:50
    
I do have a windows message loop, but I'd still have to queue my work items etc, so I don't see what I would gain anyway. –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 20:59
    
If you have only one thread handling your work, you have to queue the work anyways. I am not sure what queueing you are trying to avoid. If your work is non-threadsafe then you either queue, or use seperate processes through ProcessInfo. That is assuming that the processes themselves can manage not to clobber each other. –  GrayWizardx Dec 17 '09 at 21:02
    
I'm not trying to avoid queuing - just saying that I don't think BackgroundWorker would buy me anything, as I need to queue in both scenarios. –  Groky Dec 17 '09 at 21:09
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Hehe, I wrote something very similar recently.

With using the AutoResetEvent for synchronization, if you queue work items faster than they are processed, you end up with items in your queue, but no event triggering the processing of the items. I suggest using a semaphore so that you can maintain a count of how many times you've been signaled, such that you process all work items.

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1  
I don't think he has this problem. When one work item completes, it loops around the while loop and then takes the next item. –  Mark Byers Dec 17 '09 at 23:54
    
Ah, you are correct, Mark. –  user207462 Dec 18 '09 at 14:04
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I think you're reinventing the wheel. The supplied System.Threading.ThreadPool provides this functionality. I would just use that and get back to writing actual application logic.

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Not really answer material, especially given the fact that it's asking a lot of questions. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 17 '09 at 20:11
    
Edited to be more "answer-like" –  rossipedia Dec 17 '09 at 20:14
1  
Why does your app crash with a threadpool? Do the jobs touch the UI? If so, consider using the appropriate marshalling techniques (Control.Invoke or SynchronizationContext) to properly execute tasks on the correct thread. –  Greg D Dec 17 '09 at 20:22
1  
This just seems all wrong. If the legacy C code isn't thread safe, then why are you using threads with it at all? –  rossipedia Dec 17 '09 at 20:25
1  
Sorry, Groky. Questions like this raise red flags because they usually indicate somebody hasn't asked the right question. If you have an unusual requirement, it's generally a good idea to explain why in the question to curb such suggestions. From my perspective, e.g., I see someone who doesn't appear to be familiar with the concepts of a work or message queue (pretty fundamental real-world concepts), and so I must naturally infer the more common root cause of the question. –  Greg D Dec 17 '09 at 20:27
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