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I am developing time-demanding simulations in C++ targeting Intel x86_64 machines. After researching a little, I found two interesting libraries to enable parallelization:

As stated in docs, they both target parallelism on multicore processors but still haven't figured which one is the best. AFAIK Cilkplus simply implements three keywords for an easier parallelism (which causes GCC to be recompiled to support these keywords); while TBB is just a library to promote a better parallel development.

Which one would you recommend?

Consider that I am having many many many problems installing CilkPlus (still trying and still screaming). So I was wondering, should I go check TBB first? Is Cilkplus better than TBB? What would you recommend?

Are they compatible?

Should I accomplish installing CilkPlus (still praying for this), would it be possible to use TBB together with it? Can they work together? Is there anyone who did experience sw develpment with both CiclkPlus and TBB? Would you recommend working with them together?

Thankyou

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I have used TBB before and I'm happy with it. It has good docs and the forum is active. It's not rare to see the library developers answering the questions. Give it a try. (I never used cilkplus so I can't talk about it) – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 8:10
    
@AdriC.S.: Hello again :) Well ok, what about installation? Did you have problems? Was it smooth or, at least, didn't take 3 days... – Andry Oct 8 '13 at 8:12
1  
I worked with it both in Ubuntu and Windows. You can download the packages via the package manager in Ubuntu or you can build the sources yourself. In that case, it shouldn't be a problem. In Windows I built TBB with the cygwin environment. – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 8:20
    
Well, to be precise I built TBB with MinGW. – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 8:32
    
So @Andry, how did TBB behave? – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 14:05

Here are some FAQ type of information to the question in the original post.

Cilk Plus vs. TBB vs. Intel OpenMP

In short it depends what type of parallelization you are trying to implement and how your application is coded.

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This link also could help: Intel TBB and Cilk+ compare

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Is there a reason you can't use the pre-built GCC binaries we make available at https://www.cilkplus.org/download#gcc-development-branch ? It's built from the cilkplus_4-8_branch, and should be reasonably current.

Which solution you choose is up to you. Cilk provides a very natural way to express recursive algorithms, and its child-stealing scheduler can be very cache friendly if you use cache-oblivious algorithms. If you have questions about Cilk Plus, you'll get the best response to them in the Intel Cilk Plus forum at http://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-cilk-plus/.

Cilk Plus and TBB are aware of each other, so they should play well together if you mix them. Instead of getting a combinatorial explosion of threads you'll get at most the number of threads in the TBB thread pool plus the number of Cilk worker threads. Which usually means you'll get 2P threads (where P is the number of cores) unless you change the defaults with library calls or environment variables. You can use the vectorization features of Cilk Plus with either threading library.

- Barry Tannenbaum
  Intel Cilk Plus developer
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They can be used in complement to each other (CILK and TBB). Usually, thats the best. But from my experience you will use TBB the most. TBB and CILK will scale automatically with the number of cores. (by creating a tree of tasks, and then using recursion at run-time).

  • TBB is a runtime library for C++, that uses programmer defined Task Patterns, instead of threads. TBB will decide - at run-time - on the optimal number of threads, tasks granularity and performance oriented scheduling (Automatic load balancing through tasks stealing, Cache efficiency and memory reusing). Create tasks recursively (for a tree this is logarithmic in number of tasks).

  • CILK(plus) is a C/C++ language extension requires compiler support. Code may not be portable to different compilers and operating systems. It supports fork-join parallelism. Also, it is extremely easy to parallelize recursive algorithms. Lastly, it has a few tools (spawn, sync), with which you can parallelize a code very easily. (not a lot of rewrite is needed!).


Other differences, that might be interesting:
a) CILK's random work stealing schedule for countering "waiting" processes.
a) TBB steals from the most heavily loaded process.

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1  
Whar do you mean cilk does no scale? It perfectly does – Anton Oct 27 '15 at 18:28
    
I changed it. I have not used CILK, that much, mainly learnt about it, and that's what my prof said back then. So If you say it scales, I believe you. – Snowman Oct 28 '15 at 17:46

So, as a request from the OP:

I have used TBB before and I'm happy with it. It has good docs and the forum is active. It's not rare to see the library developers answering the questions. Give it a try. (I never used cilkplus so I can't talk about it).

I worked with it both in Ubuntu and Windows. You can download the packages via the package manager in Ubuntu or you can build the sources yourself. In that case, it shouldn't be a problem. In Windows I built TBB with MinGW under the cygwin environment.

As for the compatibility issues, there shouldn't be none. TBB works fine with Boost.Thread or OpenMP, for example; it was designed so it could be mixed with other threading solutions.

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@Andry: It's nothing! :) – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 14:43
    
"there shouldn't be none" Is that correct? – Adri C.S. Oct 8 '13 at 14:47

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