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 char* key;

 key=(char*)malloc(100);

 memset(key,'\0',100*sizeof(char));
 char*  skey="844607587";

 char* mess="hello world";


 sprintf(key,skey);

 sprintf(key,mess);
 printf("%s",key);
 free(key);

why does the printout only have the "mess" don't have skey? is there any other way to combine two strings using C?

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1  
You overwriten the last value sprintf(key,mess); –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 8 '13 at 9:07
1  
Despite the spaghetti, it is possible (and sometimes necessary) to use key+strlen(skey) as destination for the second sprintf. Just note that I said you could, not should, it is dangerous if you don't know exactly what you're doing. –  Jite Oct 8 '13 at 9:09
    
also better to use snprintf –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 8 '13 at 9:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sprintf(key,"%s%s",skey,mess);

for adding them separately :

sprintf(key,"%s",skey);
strcat(key, mess);
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how about one by one, not combing at the same time –  Song Zhibo Oct 8 '13 at 9:07
    
unfortunately not by sprintf .. because it will overwrite. –  sukhvir Oct 8 '13 at 9:08
1  
@SongZhibo because you over-writes the previous value with key's value –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 8 '13 at 9:08
1  
You can use strcat ,strcpy –  sukhvir Oct 8 '13 at 9:09
    
@sukhvir add two step suggestion in answer. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 8 '13 at 9:09

You are using sprintf twice on the same buffer, so it gets overwritten.

You could use strcat like this:

strcpy(key, skey);
strcat(key, mess);
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sprintf(key,skey);

It writes skey to key.

sprintf(key,mess);

It writes mess to key, overwriting previously written skey.

So you should use this:

sprintf(key,"%s%s", skey, mess);
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printf("Contcatened string = %s",strcat(skey,mess));
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In addition to missing format string there were also some other problems:

char* key;
key = malloc(100); // Don't cast return value of malloc in C
// Always check if malloc fails
if(key) {
    memset(key, '\0' , 100 * sizeof(char));
    const char * skey = "844607587"; // Use const with constant strings
    const char * mess = "hello world";
    // sprintf requires format string like printf
    // Use snprintf instead of sprintf to prevent buffer overruns
    snprintf(key, 100, "%s%s", skey, mess); 
    printf("%s", key);
    free(key);
}

Edit:

Version with calloc would replace malloc and remove memset:

key = calloc(100, sizeof(char));
if(key) {
    const char * skey = "844607587";
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Also use calloc to get already zeroed memory –  mvp Oct 8 '13 at 9:13
    
@mvp True, better to use calloc if available. –  user694733 Oct 8 '13 at 9:15

your code is follows

sprintf(key,skey);
sprintf(key,mess);
printf("%s",key);

result will be "hello world"

you may change code to as follows

sprintf(key, "%s%s", skey, key);
printf("%s",key);

the result as follows "844607587hello world"

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the code is as below:

strncpy(key, skey, strlen(skey));
strcat(key, mess);
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