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I'm learning MVVM "on the fly" but I'm having troubles finding the correct location of a validator class.

I have project with my businesslogic and a WPF-project. The last one is created following the MVVM-pattern.

The purpose of the app is to read data from an external device and validate that data. The validation-methods (1 for each device-property) are stored in the BL.

In the GUI I need to show the device properties and whether are not they are valid.

What I have now:

  • 1 view (MainWindowView)
  • 1 viewmodel (MainWindowViewModel)
  • 1 model (DeviceModel)

The MainWindowViewModel has a property of type DeviceModel. This property is used to show the device-data on the view. At the moment I have a few HasValidPropXxxx properties of type bool which are bound to the Background-property of the appropriate textbox (using an IValueConverter from bool to Color). Since it were only 5 properties I thought they were in a good place.

Now the requirements have changed (obviously) and I have to show and validate a lot more device properties. I was thinking to create a DeviceValidator-class which holds all the HasValidPropXxxx properties and does the validation-calls to the BL.

What I would like to know is:

  1. Is this a good way of thinking (especially regarding MVVM)
  2. In what location should I put that validator: Models? ViewModels? Other folder?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For validation, I always implement either the IDataErrorInfo or INotifyDataErrorInfo interfaces, with the second being newer and (in my opinion) better. When implementing these interfaces in the model, or data type classes, you provide validation right where the properties are defined. This makes complete sense to me, as it also allows complex validation to be performed using multiple property values.

Here is a short example of IDataErrorInfo... first implement the Item indexer method:

public override string this[string propertyName]
{
    get
    {
        string error = string.Empty;
        if (propertyName == "Name" && Name == string.Empty) error = "Enter Name";
        else if (propertyName == "Age" && Age < 18) error = "You're too young";
        return error;
    }
}

The IDataErrorInfo interface exposes a property named Error which this indexer sets when any relevant property of the model class is changed. We can Bind to this property in the UI to show the error messages, but just one at a time with this interface without customisation:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding Error}" />
<TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}" />
<TextBlock Text="{Binding Age}" />

UPDATE >>>

When I want to change something based on whether there is an error message in the Error property, I add a bool property into the model base class:

public bool HasError
{
    return Error != null && Error != string.Empty;
}

Then I simply use this bool property with a BoolToWhateverConverter... in your case, you'd want to create a BooleanToBrushConverter. If you need help with that, please ask another question and I will look out for it.

UPDATE 2 >>>

@Koen, you are correct that the HasError property reflects whether there are any validation errors in the model object. However, there is nothing to stop you from adding another property into a particular data type class:

string nameError = "Enter Name";
...
public override string this[string propertyName]
{
    get
    {
        string error = string.Empty;
        if (propertyName == "Name" && Name == string.Empty) error = nameError;
        else if (propertyName == "Age" && Age < 18) error = "You're too young";
        return error;
    }
}

public bool HasNameError
{
    return Error == nameError;
}

It is certainly preferable to have these properties in the model class so that you do not have to replicate code in each view model that the model class appears in.

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I Need to change the background of the corresponding textbox/label when the device-property is invalid. Is this possible using those interfaces? At first glance I don't see how. –  Koen Oct 8 '13 at 10:32
    
I already have the BoolToBrushConverter working, but I was wondering if I could - using the IDataErrorInfo - change the color of 1 textbox, regardless of the other proerties have an error. At this moment I have an IsValidPropXxxx for each property. Looking at your update it is validation for the complete object. Am I coorect? –  Koen Oct 8 '13 at 10:58
    
@Koen : Please see the link this will have explantation about ErrorTemplate msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Ravuthasamy Oct 8 '13 at 11:00
    
@Sheridan Thx. You've convinced me. ;-) –  Koen Oct 8 '13 at 11:10
    
@Ravuthasamy Thanks for the interesting link, but for this project I will have to write too much validation-classes to implement the different rules. It's easier (and more readable) in my case if I can just put the validation in a method per property. –  Koen Oct 8 '13 at 11:12

you could use the system.componentmodel.dataannotations to validate properties. Then call a validate method to execute those data annotations. although looking at your reputation I assume you know about these. if so ignore this answer

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I haven't used it in the past, but in my case I don't think it is appropriate. I will have to write a lot of (small) custom validator-classes (almost 1 for each property of the device). I think it's more readable (IMHO) to put all those validation-methods into 1 class. –  Koen Oct 8 '13 at 10:21

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