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If I make a batch script named temp.bat (for example) containing:

exit /b 1

When I run it in various ways, I get different behavior on my 32-bit XP system vs. a 64-bit XP system.

On 32-bit:

> temp.bat
> echo %ERRORLEVEL%
1
> cmd /c temp.bat
> echo %ERRORLEVEL%
0

On 64-bit:

> temp.bat
> echo %ERRORLEVEL%
1
> cmd /c temp.bat
> echo %ERRORLEVEL%
1

I've searched through the cmd.exe options and I have been unable to find any options controlling how it propagates errorlevel information from batch scripts. At this point I'm unable to find any rational explanation for this difference.

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My guess: The 32-bit version maintaining the original behaviour is due to backwards compatibility. The 64-bit version doesn't have that requirement, so has behaviour more friendly to automated scripts. –  Anon. Dec 17 '09 at 21:04
    
Aha! Raymond's daughter [blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2003/12/24/45779.aspx] vs Raymond's bridesmaid [blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2009/12/02/… –  PA. Dec 18 '09 at 7:19
    
Can't reproduce here. Works the same on both 32 and 64 bit. –  Joey Dec 18 '09 at 8:57
1  
Anon: batch files have no way of indicating whether they want to run 32-bit or 64-bit on a 64-bit system. Your point there is essentially false. What doesn't work anymore on 64-bit systems is 16-bit executables; 32-bit continues to work just fine. –  Joey Dec 18 '09 at 8:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have to be careful with exit /b since it does not actually work correctly in all instances. For example:

temp.bat&&echo 0||echo 1

If temp.bat contains exit /b 1 you would expect 1 to be printed, but it is not. Sadly, the only way to really set a working exit code for a batch file is to use @%COMSPEC% /C exit 1 as the last line in the batch file

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Excellent, I tried your suggestion and it works the same on both machines. –  paraquat Dec 21 '09 at 14:45

The problem with Anders's example is that it uses a .bat file. If you use a .cmd file, exit works as documented.

The main point of having both .bat and .cmd files seems to be backward compatibility: if it's executing a .bat file, cmd tries to emulate the pre-NT CLI, command.com, which had much simpler error handling.

At least that's my surmise. I stumbled on this thread while googling for official docs on the .bat/.cmd thing, which I can't seem to find.

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